Keepapitchinin, the Mormon History blog
 


To LDS Servicemenin Italy: July 1945

By: Ardis E. Parshall - October 03, 2014

The war had ended, but American L.D.S. servicemen by the hundreds were still in Italy in July 1945, when this newsletter was issued by the two remaining chaplains.

L.D.S. Headquarters
Italy

July 1, 1945

Dear Brethren:

Since the close of the war our mailing list has dwindled from two thousand L.D.S. men to approximately four hundred. Some have left for home and some for the pacific. others are preparing to leave.

Among the departees this month are Chaplain Vern Cooley and Brother Claude Burtenshaw. Vern is headed for the Pacific via the United States and wife, Claude, for home and wife unconditionally. A heartfelt vote of thanks goes from all of us to these brethren. it has been largely their efforts that have made possible the splendid conferences, the monthly letters, and the coordination of L.D.s. work in the theater generally. We wish them much success in their activities wherever they may go.

Many of our fine group leaders and former group leaders also are on their way to other fields. We are deeply indebted for the work they have done and indebted to the Church that produces the many splendid men that it has been our privilege to meet during our overseas tour of duty.

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The Prophet Speaks

By: Ardis E. Parshall - October 02, 2014

The Prophet Speaks

By Mabel Jones Gabbott

So tall he stood there, noble, fine and proud,
Sustained by power greater than his own.
He said, “I shall not talk so very loud,”
But in his eyes a glorious message shone.
He read the excerpts that he had prepared
And then forgetting self and doctors too,
He poured his heart out to the Saints and shared
With us, his testimony stro0ng and true.

His words came freely, ringing rich and clear:
“God lives, have faith in Him, and keep His word.”
It seemed to me the Lord was very near
And prompting him to say the things we heard.
The Prophet spoke today, so kind, so dear,
And my heart prayed, “Bless President Grant, dear Lord.”

(1941)

My New Rule

By: Ardis E. Parshall - October 02, 2014

A common way for archives like the Church History Library to organize the correspondence of historical figures is to first sort the letters by year written, and then within each year sort the letters alphabetically by the name of correspondent. So, for example, if you wanted to know what Joseph F. Smith was reporting to Brigham Young while JFS was a missionary in England, you’d go to the files for 1874 and 1875, and in each of those files you would skip past all the letters written by people named Abbott and Brown and Cannon and Davis and Edwards and … down to the point where Smith fits alphabetically. Voila.

Earlier this week I was reading through the correspondence of a 20th century Church leader. In the files for 1944, and in the first folder where letters from people whose names began with A and B, I ran across letters written by James Shelby Arrigona, Jeannie Simpson Bleakley, and Carl Clifton Booth, all of whom have figured in Keepa stories. These people were scattered from Texas to Ceylon to Bikini Atoll, but they all were connected through acquaintance with this one man whose papers I was reading. When I found and wrote their stories for Keepa, I had no idea they shared this connection with one man.

That’s the way real life works. You discover that your cousin was a college roommate of your bishop’s brother, or that your sister’s new missionary companion grew up in the town where you lived in sixth grade and knows all your old school teachers and Primary classmates.

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“I Take Up My Pen”: Bannock Stake, 1896

By: Ardis E. Parshall - October 02, 2014

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The Third House Down

By: Ardis E. Parshall - October 01, 2014

From the Relief Society Magazine, May 1957 –

The Third House Down

By Florence B. Dunford

The first Grace Warren knew that their neighbors, across the street and the third house down, were moving was when she saw it in the morning Chronicle.

She looked across the breakfast table in the small, perfectly appointed dining room at her husband. “Tom, the Normans down the street are moving to California. The Whites had a neighborhood party for them last night.”

Tom, one of those good-looking homely men, looked up from his half of the paper. “Oh. How come they didn’t invite us?”

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“I Take Up My Pen”: Taylor Bros. Co., 1906

By: Ardis E. Parshall - October 01, 2014

T.N. Taylor was bishop of one of the Provo wards.

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You Are Cordially Invited to a Silver Wedding Celebration

By: Ardis E. Parshall - October 01, 2014

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Daddy

By: Ardis E. Parshall - September 30, 2014

Daddy

By E. Carvel Campbell
Providence, Utah

’Tis your birthday today, Dad; I’m thinking of you,
Tho’ I’m not there to tell you my thoughts
Or to give you my wishes, or help bring you joy.
I know you won’t say, “He forgot.”

You’re older today, Dad; the years passing by
Add care, as is shown on your brow –
You’ve struggled to help me, I’ve caused you much pain –
I can see what you’ve done for me now.

Yes, I’m thinking of Mother today, as are you,
How she’s suffered and worried for me.
But as Mother has suffered, you, Daddy, have toiled –
You, dear Father, and dear Mother, she.

I’m glad, you’ve helped me. The thoughts you have given
Are chiseled in me as in stone.
I’m happy to think of the blessings I’ve had
Given freely by you, dear, alone.

Today, Dad, I hope someone cheers you along,
That you’ll have joy and happiness, too.
I hope you’ll have many bright birthdays to come –
I thank God for a father like you.

(1925)

Shape Up!

By: Ardis E. Parshall - September 30, 2014

From the Juvenile Instructor, 1917 —

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The Trials of Cora Birdsall, part 13

By: Ardis E. Parshall - September 30, 2014

On March 18, 1907, the three-member Utah Supreme Court finally issued their ruling in the case of “Cora Birdsall, an insane person, by Isaac Birdsall her guardian, against James E. Leavitt and [wife].” Joseph E. Frick wrote the decision; William M. McCarty and Daniel N. Straup concurred.

First, the Court briefly reviewed the facts of the case, but only briefly – “The evidence is quite voluminous,” Frick wrote, “and to set it out would require too much space.” Instead, he picked out only facts that had a bearing on the Court’s final decision:

“The physician who treated Cora Birdsall was called as a witness, and testified as an expert from what he learned from personal observation of his patient. He in substance testified that Cora Birdsall suffered from a mental breakdown, … and that she at that time, in his judgment, was mentally incompetent and wholly incapacitated from making a deed. Her relatives testified to substantially the same effect, basing their statements upon actual observation and contact with Miss Birdsall.”

And what did Leavitt’s attorneys have to offer in contradiction to this?

“There is no evidence against this, except the conclusions of some of her neighbors, none of whom giving any specific data on which their conclusions are based, and being non-experts, their testimony is thus entitled to but little, if any, weight.”

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