Keepapitchinin, the Mormon History blog
 


We Are So Busy

By: Ardis E. Parshall - February 07, 2014

From the Relief Society Magazine, March 1949 –

We Are So Busy

By Sylvia Probst Young

Instead of closing her house, as she usually did when she went to California, Emily Woodrow left it in the care of a nephew and his wife from Indiana. The young man, a college professor, had accepted an offer to teach at our university for the summer, and Emily was delighted.

“I’m so happy to have someone in the place for the summer,”she told me.  “I never have liked closing it up, but I didn’t like renting to strangers. Of course, you could almost call Tom a stranger. I haven’t seen him since he was a high school boy and I don’t know anything at all about his wife. But I hope you’ll call on them, Kate. Salt Lake will be new to them and I know they will appreciate having a good neighbor like you.”

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“I Take Up My Pen”: Swiss and German Mission, 1904

By: Ardis E. Parshall - February 07, 2014

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Latter-day Saint Images, 1933 (2)

By: Ardis E. Parshall - February 07, 2014

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Netherlands Mission
Gleaner Girls

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Does It Pay?

By: Ardis E. Parshall - February 06, 2014

Does It Pay?

By Marie Jensen, Basalt, Idaho

It seems to me I once did say that you are always spending
So much good time – if you was home you might do lots of mending.
If I spent half the time you do, at meeting every day,
I’d go behind with all my work, I’m sure it does not pay.

Religion I have never found a paying proposition –
It’s meeting or it’s giving gifts without much compensation.
I want religion to be light. If it was easy work
I’d take a hand in everything and not hang back and shirk.

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“Neither Music, Melody, nor Harmony”

By: Ardis E. Parshall - February 06, 2014

Just for kicks and giggles, here’s aletter I just read, written in 1949 by Leah D. Widtsoe (granddaughter of Brigham Young, wife of apostle John A. Widtsoe). Addressed to Radio Station KMUR in Murray, Utah, Leah writes:

Dear Gentlemen:

Unfortunately, I have had a cold for the last week and I have enjoyed listening to your music, mostly because there is not too much jazz in it. Your music for luncheon between twelve3 and one o’clock is lovely. I have enjoyed it so much.

I have a radio, F.M., but that doesn’t come on until three o’clock so I have enjoyed your music, which gives me pleasure frequently before that hour.

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Provident Living, Brought to You by … SUGAR

By: Ardis E. Parshall - February 06, 2014

From 1946 —

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A Few Minutes in Sanford, Colorado, 1889

By: Ardis E. Parshall - February 06, 2014

The Quarterly Conf of the San Luis Stake of Zion convened at Sanford Colorado on the Seventeenth day of February AD 1889 at 10 oClock A.M.

Sanford Choir Sang “The morning breaks the shadows flee, Lo! Zion’s Standard is unfurled!”

Prayer by George W Irven.

Choir sang: “Once more we come before our God and more his blessing ask”

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One Day Off

By: Ardis E. Parshall - February 05, 2014

From the Relief Society Magazine, July 1934 –

One Day Off

By Gwenevere Anderson

“Tomorrow. Tomorrow perhaps I’ll bring her back with me, dear little Lucy! Oh, if I only could!” Mrs. Donner kept saying over and over to herself as her hands deftly slipped cards in and out of books and placed the stamp of the library on them.

But the words, for some reason, did not seem to bring her comfort. Although the library was clean and quiet as usual, although it was pervaded with its own reassuring sounds of rustling papers and hurried footsteps to and from the stacks, there seemed to Mrs. Donner to be a feeling of unrest and uneasiness in the air. The familiar smell of dirty books and old paper seemed to carry something unusual and electric – an indefinable foreboding of disaster. she tried to shake it from her, but even as she looked up to see Mrs. Bray waiting her turn – Mrs. Bray, with her correct and cultured look – she felt uneasy.

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“I Take Up My Pen”: Wayne Stake, 1900

By: Ardis E. Parshall - February 05, 2014

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My First Visit to a Japanese Home

By: Ardis E. Parshall - February 05, 2014

Alma O. Taylor served for more than eight years as a mission in Japan, from the opening of the Japan Mission in 1901 to Alma’s return to Utah in 1910. He served as mission president for much of that time and translated the Book of Mormon and other materials into Japanese. By the time he was released, he was thoroughly appreciative of Japanese culture and the goodness of the Japanese people. In this report, though, from his earliest days in the mission, while he was still struggling to learn Japanese and to feel comfortable in Japan, he may remind you of yourself in your first days away from home …

My First Visit to a Japanese Home

By Alma O. Taylor

Last Friday I went up to a little country village some thirty-six miles northeast of Tokyo and spent a day and a night in a purely Japanese style at the home of Mr. Aoki, our Japanese teacher. The things which I saw and what I experienced would take the descriptive powers of a Dickens or some other great writer to produce on paper or tell to others, but I will endeavor to tell in a rough way how it happened.

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