Keepapitchinin, the Mormon History blog
 


Andrew Sproul, Missionary: August – October 1841

By: Ardis E. Parshall - June 29, 2014

Sunday, August 1st, 1841 – Brew & I according to appointment of the council started again for Nilston [Neilston] in company with B. Sawden & Findley for Barhead, we agreed to unite our hearts in prayer at the usual place before parting. Brew was very ill on the way & after prayer he desired the ordinance of laying on of hands, which was done after prayer & he was restored instantly to our joy. We came to Nilston. We went to our friend’s house, G. Caldwell, & sat with a few people reasoning from scripture for 2 hours. We came to B. Shanks & rested & got some food & returned to Nilston in the evening & preached the gospel in its simplicity. We said we or some others would be here next Sunday & we came away & 2 men came after us inquiring into those things concerning there peace. They came 4 miles & we parted.

Sunday, August 7th, 1841 – B. Camble & I went to Williamsburgh according to promise & we lifted a warning voice & told them where they would get more information, & we left them & we said we or some others would come again. the same day Brew & A. Sprowl started for Nilston & B. Sawden & b. Findley for Barhead. We again united in prayer & parted. We came to our friend’s house, G. Caldwell, we stayed a while & told the things of the Kingdom & we preached to a number of people in the evening at the cross & we said to them we or some others would be here next Sunday & we left them & desired God’s blessing with them & us.

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First Presidency Statement on Apostasy

By: Ardis E. Parshall - June 28, 2014

While I’m sure you’ll all see this from a dozen other sources, I still wanted to put it on record here. This letter appears here at lds.org.

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints
Office of the First Presidency

47 East South Temple Street, Salt Lake City, Utah 84150

June 28, 2014

In God’s plan for the happiness and eternal progression of His children, the blessings of His priesthood are equally available to men and women. Only men are ordained to serve in priesthood offices. All service in the Church has equal merit in the eyes of God. We express profound gratitude for the millions of Latter-day Saint women and men who willingly and effectively serve God and His children. Because of their faith and service, they have discovered that the Church is a place of spiritual nourishment and growth.

We understand that from time to time Church members will have questions about Church doctrine, history, or practice. Members are always free to ask such questions and earnestly seek greater understanding. We feel special concern, however, for members who distance themselves from Church doctrine or practice and, by advocacy, encourage others to follow them.

Simply asking questions has never constituted apostasy. Apostasy is repeatedly acting in clear, open, and deliberate public opposition to the Church or its faithful leaders, or persisting, after receiving counsel, in teaching false doctrine.

The Council of
The First Presidency and
Quorum of the Twelve Apostles
of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints

Saturday Remix, 1916

By: Ardis E. Parshall - June 28, 2014

First Lessons

“What is a man-of-war?” said a teacher to his class.

“A cruiser,” was the prompt reply.

“What makes it go?”

“Its screw, sir.”

“Who goes with it?”

“Its crew, sir.”

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Contentment Is a Lovely Thing — Chapter 3

By: Ardis E. Parshall - June 27, 2014

Contentment Is a Lovely Thing

By Dorothy S. Romney

Previous episode

Chapter 3

Synopsis: Margaret Lansing, whose husband Jed has become a farmer contrary to the wishes of his parents, is worried over the visit of Jed’s father, a prominent brain surgeon, and his wife, whom she had never seen. Just before their arrival Margaret is taken ill, and since the young couple find it impossible to get help, the mother-in-law assumes the care of the household and the baby Kimmy. She tries to persuade Jed to return with them to the city and resume his medical studies, and Margaret thinks that the difficult work around the farm home has made her mother-in-law more than ever opposed to country life.

When Jed came to her before he had his lunch, she knew immediately that she had been right, that his mother had worked beyond her strength, and that she was not enjoying her visit.

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Sleepy Time, 1930

By: Ardis E. Parshall - June 27, 2014

From the Children’s Friend, February 1930 —

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“God Requires This at Our Hands”: The View from 1895

By: Ardis E. Parshall - June 27, 2014

Margaret (Maggie) Cluff Hobson was 32, and mother of 5 of her 6 children, in 1895 when she wrote this essay for the YLMIA “Review” of the Salt Lake 4th Ward.

OUR POSITION

It seems to me we do not sense as we ought the perils of our present situation as Latter Day Saints. We know that we are God’s chosen people who have been reserved and selected to accomplish his work in the last days when all dispensations will be gathered into one; but do we really understand what our Father expects us to do for ourselves that we may accomplish His work for Him?

Let us look at the situation for a moment. A single generation ago our people were driven into the seclusion of these mountain vales where they could practice the virtues of their religion with none to oppose. In this seclusion and in an atmosphere that was almost absolutely pure morally, the present active generation of Mormon parents were born and bred. Our fathers had come from various parts of the world and were traditionated in the fallacies and moral impurities of the world; but when they came to these mountain wilds they left Babylon behind and with the light of the gospel to inspire them, reared their families in truth and purity. The grosser crimes of the world were almost unknown among our people. Murder, arson, robbing & swindling were rare indeed, while the more insidious and destructive sins of sexual impurity were mentioned, only to be condemned and placed in the same category with murder. And when we think of it, what is more serious than tampering with the fountain of life, unless it be destroying life itself?

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Tonight! Women of Faith, Evening with the Editors and Authors

By: Ardis E. Parshall - June 26, 2014

This is tonight! And did I mention, it’s TONIGHT.

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Hill Woman

By: Ardis E. Parshall - June 26, 2014

Hill Woman

By Maude Blixt Trone

I do not care to talk with men
Whose ears have never heard
The misery from little things –
The wail of a wounded bird.

I could not love a man whose eyes
Are blinded to the sight
Of a moon brittled by the frost
And chipping off its light.

I will not marry any man
Until he proves to me
That he can plant the smallest seed
As well as fell a tree.

(1946)

The Great Question

By: Ardis E. Parshall - June 26, 2014

A song from 1905 —

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The Trials of Cora Birdsall: part 4

By: Ardis E. Parshall - June 26, 2014

Cora obeyed the summons she had received and attended the bishop’s court scheduled in Monroe, Utah, on 29 October 1901. Her father, Isaac, who had also been accused of un-Christianlike conduct and also summoned to appear, did not attend.

The setting for the court would have been quite different from what we might imagine today. I do not know what the particular arrangement was in this case, but most Mormon chapels of that era in small rural communities like Monroe were nothing like today’s buildings: Virtually all of the space under the roof would have consisted of the single large room where worship was conducted. Benches were likely not permanently attached to the floor, but were movable so that the same space could be used as a schoolroom, a courtroom, a dance hall, or serve any other community need – it was probably the largest building in town.

Many such buildings also had a small vestibule at the front, serving as a buffer between the outside world and the actual worship space, but any such entryway was only a few feet deep, large enough for removing coats and stamping the snow off boots, but not fitted with any tables or chairs. There would have been no cultural hall, no hallways, no classrooms, no Relief Society or Primary rooms, no restrooms, and no office space. There was no bishop’s office. At least one bishop in the area had a room built at the end of his house, with an outside entrance, that he used as an office. Towns with tithing yards for the receipt and storage of donated produce usually had accounting offices that could be used for small meetings.

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