Keepapitchinin, the Mormon History blog
 


Deseret Stone, 1853

By: Ardis E. Parshall - March 07, 2014

Utah Territory, under the direction of Brigham Young, sent this stone in 1853 as its contribution to the Washington Monument (another stone with the Utah name was sent years later). The stone was quarried in Manti, of the same material later used in the Manti Temple; it was carved by pioneer artist William Ward, and is found in the Monument stairway at the 220-foot mark. The stone is carved to be read normally, but daguerreotypes (this is a very early picture of the stone) display in mirror image.

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Women’s Service, a Strength to the Church: The View from 1962

By: Ardis E. Parshall - March 07, 2014

This extract comes from a Relief Society lesson written by Ariel S. Ballif (an elder).

The activity of the women in the Church program is a manifestation of dedication to a great cause. This is demonstrated by a situation in the mission field where three wonderful Maori ladies, old in years, but vigorous in the love of the gospel, held a little branch together for many years until the Priesthood holders were regenerated. These faithful sisters did everything but the ordinances, and they guided the young Aaronic Priesthood members in the care and administration of the sacrament.

Many times the women of the wards and stakes have provided the activity necessary to the success of Priesthood projects. Through the efforts of the women in the home, the men are constantly built up and encouraged. They care for the children, assist their men in projects and programs, and provide leadership for the auxiliary organizations.

The blessings in store for the women of the church are limited only by the efforts they put forth to build the kingdom. Every effort they put forth in gaining knowledge, in exercising faith, and in performance of duty is a step toward perfect, and every step toward perfection adds blessings. The Lord is mindful of those who serve him. “… I, the Lord, am merciful and gracious unto those who … serve me in righteousness and in truth unto the end. Great shall be their reward and eternal shall be their glory” (D&C 76:4-6).

“Scallywags to Its Ranks,” 1901

By: Ardis E. Parshall - March 06, 2014

NORTH CHINA HERALD (Shanghai)
11 December 1901

The Mormons

Tokyo. — A Mormon prophet of the name of Heber J. Grant and three Elders, one of them a boy of 19, are at present staying in the Hotel Metropole here, but will soon move to a house close by, as they have received official permission to preach, on the express condition that they do not preach polygamy, and as they consequently intend to remain here a number of years. They are all merchants, able to pay their way, and their outward appearance differs in nowise from that of average laymen. But it is impossible to remain near them long without learning who they are, for they seem to be anything but ashamed of their belief and are eagerly on the lookout for converts, – European or Japanese, it’s all the same to them. In the evenings they sometimes take possession of the Hotel piano and sing inoffensive religious songs of the “Holy City” type until they imagine that they have worked the audience up to the proper degree of fevour [fervor?] whereupon they venture a little further and exhort people in general (in alleged poetry) to “Judge not harshly,” etc., etc., the concluding hymns being tearful appeals for tolerance and, if possible, sympathy (for the poor, dear Mormons, of course, although the sect is never mentioned by name).

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Knowledge

By: Ardis E. Parshall - March 06, 2014

Knowledge

By Daphne Jemmett

At twenty I knew, and I knew I knew –
While at thirty, I wasn’t sure.
At forty I knew that I didn’t know
A lot I had known before.
At fifty I sigh, and wonder how
One who had known so much so young,
Can know so little now.

(1945)

“I Take Up My Pen”: Manti Temple, 1891

By: Ardis E. Parshall - March 06, 2014

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The “Itch”

By: Ardis E. Parshall - March 06, 2014

Fliesconstipationexecution … is there anything the Church magazines of the past haven’t addressed? Here’s a missionary report published in the Juvenile Instructor in 1886 detailing scabies, or “the itch.”

Curing the Itch in Twenty-Four Hours

By Charles Henry Wilcken

During the Franco-Prussian war a large body of French troops took refuge in Switzerland, to escape capture, and according to certain rules of war among civilized nations, they were compelled to remain inactive, having retreated to neutral ground. While there they infested the portion of the country where they were quartered, (the east Swiss) with the disease commonly known as “the itch” to such an extent, that hardly a family escaped the dreadful scourge.1

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  1. Wilcken, himself a Prussian, should probably not be trusted on this point. []

Chicago’s Welfare Project, 1943

By: Ardis E. Parshall - March 05, 2014

CHICAGO DAILY NEWS
16 March 1943, 6/1

Mormons Rent 20-Acre Tract to Grow Food

Mormons of Chicago, expecting a food shortage next winter, today announced plans for gardens and orchards that will produce vegetables, fruits and berries for canning 20,000 quarts of food during the late summer and fall. A cannery will be established to process them.

Bishop A.L. Williams, head of the Logan Square ward of the Chicago stake — or district – announced that 20 acres of excellent truck farming land on Grand av. not far from Mannheim rd., had been rented and would be divided into small plots for intensive cultivation by members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints here.

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She Shall Have Music

By: Ardis E. Parshall - March 05, 2014

From the Relief Society Magazine, March 1951 –

She Shall Have Music

By Frances Carter Yost

The warm golden sunlight poured over the valley like butter and honey. The leaves of the climbing vine outside the window turned listlessly. As Ann Marley watched Parley working in the nearby field, time seemed to dissolve with the sound of his mower.

For three days now Ann had wanted to tell Parley about the spinet piano the Warrens had for sale, but every time he was around words congealed in her throat. If it had been a new washer, or a sewing machine, or even a deep freeze, practical Parley would understand the need. He would even get busy doing some dickering to see that she had it. But a piano, to Parley, would be considered a toy, something to play with. Parley wouldn’t want to pay his hard-earned money for a piano. Parley didn’t know either about the inward music in Ann’s soul, the deep desire which had somehow spun itself, through the years, into a hard ball of dissatisfaction.

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Before There Was Postum

By: Ardis E. Parshall - March 05, 2014

From 1927 –

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The Ward Music Guild 6: Interpretation of Music (Tempo)

By: Ardis E. Parshall - March 05, 2014

Sixth Guild Meeting: March, 1944

By Dr. Frank W. Asper
Tabernacle Organist and
Member, Church Music Committee

Tempo, or pace, is common to all mankind. Yet, as the heartbeat varies in different persons, so the degree of tempo feeling differs, too. Psychologists point out that there are variations in responsiveness to movement in music according to the age, the country, the race, and the century.

It is a well-known fact that the metronome mark on some compositions are not correct, especially of the masterpieces written before Beethoven’s time, for the reason that the metronome was not then invented, and they have been put on by men who have edited the compositions. Unfortunately, most of the metronome marks in our own L.D.S. hymnal are too slow. They do very well in the tabernacle in Salt Lake City, where there is much reverberation and carrying over of tone, but they should be faster in the majority of our ward chapels, where a smaller and less ponderous body of singers tends to create a lack of interest if they sing at the speeds indicated.

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