Keepapitchinin, the Mormon History blog
 


“I Take Up My Pen”: Brazilian Mission, 1935

By: Ardis E. Parshall - August 21, 2013

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“O Britain! Dear Britain!”

By: Ardis E. Parshall - August 21, 2013

In 1933, the Millennial Star sponsored a contest urging members of the Church in Great Britain to compose songs – to be sung to popular Church hymn tunes – celebrating the British Isles as a home for the Saints. The winning composition was submitted by Joseph Orton Bettridge (1895-1966), a member of the Hucknall Branch, Nottingham District. For his efforts, Brother Bettridge received a copy of The Life of Brigham Young, by Susa Young Gates, presented by Leah D. Widtsoe, Susa’s daughter and, as wife of then-president of the British Mission, leader of the women’s auxiliaries in the mission.

(Presented today in honor of the recent British Pageant reviewed today by Joel, at By Common Consent.)

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Two Months a Missionary

By: Ardis E. Parshall - August 20, 2013

Two Months a Missionary

By Clifford L. Oviatt

Memory lingers as a hangman
Over all my thoughts so kind,
As I think of happy faces,
And of friends I left behind;
As I hold my pen it trembles:
In my throat, there’s something swells
Which I cannot seem to swallow,
And o’er my eyes a dimness wells.

When I think of all the kind hands,
Firm and ready, there to guide,
As I staggered down life’s roadway
There to help me at my side.
I was blind and young and reckless,
Thinking naught but of myself.
How did they keep hoping, praying,
That some day I’d find the path?

In my prayers I ask for courage,
Ask for faith and strength and time,
That the Lord will bless my labors
In this work here, so sublime:
So that I may be found worthy
Of the trust that’s placed in me,
That with them I may be always
Throughout all eternity.

(1940)

“I Take Up My Pen”: Deseret News, 1906

By: Ardis E. Parshall - August 20, 2013

“Official Organ of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints”:

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Greetings, LDS Serviceman! (1949)

By: Ardis E. Parshall - August 20, 2013

The World War II-era military conscription in the United States ended in 1947 (the Selective Service System and Selective Training and Service Act were still in effect until 1948, but Congress did not authorize an actual draft in 1947); huge numbers of men called into the service before that date were still in the armed forces or in the reserves. The Selective Service Act of 1948 renewed the requirement for men of military age to register for possible service, and in 1950 conscription returned to meet the emergency of the Korean War.

In other words, there were a great many men in military service in those years, which inevitably included a great many LDS men.

The LDS Servicemen’s Committee, a General Authority-led committee, prepared a very small booklet, small enough to fit into a vest pocket, to alert LDS servicemen to a number of issues affecting their religious lives in service. The text of that 1949 booklet appears below.

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Father Has His Day

By: Ardis E. Parshall - August 19, 2013

From the Relief Society Magazine, June 1936 –

Father Has His Day

By E. Cannon Porter

Peter Clark tossed restlessly in his bed. He had lain awake all night. Nor did he feel inclined to turn on his bedside light and read as he did on other sleepless occasions. He had lost his job. He had held it all through the depression but was dismissed when things began to pick up.

As one of the oldest salesmen in the Travers furniture store he had been kept on, not only on account of seniority, but because he knew personally most of the old customers, who liked him.

Then old man Travers was found dead in his bed one morning and his sons proceeded to “modernize” the business. Not only did they do over the building, and augment the stock, but they installed whipper-snapper young salesmen and let the old hands go.

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From Google to Keepa: What They’re Looking For

By: Ardis E. Parshall - August 19, 2013

Some navel-gazing today as we check in with the Google queries that bring people to Keepa, with a chance to revisit some favorite old posts.

There seems to be considerable interest in the movie 17 Miracles, particularly in its accuracy, which brings visitors to 17 Miracles, More or Less:

albert in 17 miracles
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17 miracles midget
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dwarf in 17 miracles
levi savage and the donner party
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pioneer story lds dried meat given by known man
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was there a midget in the martin handcart company
willie martin handcart company midget

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Venus in Tahiti: 5 September – 4 October 1916

By: Ardis E. Parshall - August 18, 2013

(Previous installment)

Tues. Sept 5, 1916.

Washed and cared for baby & sister. Doctor called. Martha Krausser came to see the baby. Tuai wove niaus to make an awning for the back porch by sister’s room, as it is on the sunny side of the house.

Wed. Sept. 6, 1916.

Washed & cared for patients. The princess sent a bouquet of roses to sister, & Madame [blank] one of the French official wives who lives around the corner brought the baby a little white satin & lace bonnet, and [blank], a young native girl brought it a little outing flannel dress.

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Funny Bones, 1932 (6)

By: Ardis E. Parshall - August 17, 2013

Overdoing It

Old Gentleman – “I see that in London a man is run over every half hour.”

Old Lady – “Poor fellow!”

They Alternate

Jonesy: “Tell me, old man, who wears the trousers at your house?”

Smitty (depression victim): “Well, I’m wearing them today.”

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“Poor Little Rosalee”

By: Ardis E. Parshall - August 16, 2013

From the Relief Society Magazine, November 1950 –

“Poor Little Rosalee”

By Norma Wrathall

It was a hot July afternoon when Alta Bowman, a fresh cherry pie in her hand, tapped on the kitchen screen of her recently widowed young neighbor. At the choked sound from within, she opened the door. “Why, you poor child,” she murmured.

There was Rosalee, trying ineffectually to force a wire down the sink drain. Her face was smudged with tears.

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