Keepapitchinin, the Mormon History blog
 


A Few Minutes in the Chicago Branch, 1909

By: Ardis E. Parshall - August 13, 2014

Sunday, November 14th 1909

Meeting commenced by singing Hymn 139 (Our Mountain Home so Dear) followed by prayer by Bro. Ephraim Ericson. The Choir then sang Hymn No 58 (Hark, Listen to the Trumpeters)

Whilst the Sacrament was being administered by Elder E.W. Polsen & Elder Wesley E. Smith, the hymn on page 70 was also sung by the Choir.

Certificates of Temporary membership were read & approved of, Bro W. Weech, from the Pine Grove Ward, Union Stake.

A Bottle of Oil was then consecrated by Elder F.P. Hammond, assisted by Elders Lattimer & President Jos. A. Geddes.

Elder Judd, who is a delegate from Utah to the National Land Congress, was the speaker. He gave a history of his life, told how he accepted the Gospel in England & described the trials & difficulties of Crossing the Plains. He dealt fully with the progress of the Church in its early days, & bore a faithful testimony to the Gospel, & the principles of the True Church in these last days.

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Testament

By: Ardis E. Parshall - August 12, 2014

Testament

Christie Lund Coles

He lives! Oh, let me say the words,
As real in me as breath;
He lived, he died, he rose again,
He triumphed over death.

He lives! His promise lifts my heart,
His goodness heals my soul.
Beyond this earthly path, I, too
Shall rise, serene and whole.

(1963)

“A Little Child Shall Lead”: 3

By: Ardis E. Parshall - August 12, 2014

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Guest Post: An Organist in Trouble

By: Amy Tanner Thiriot - August 12, 2014

In anticipation of Daniel Berghout’s upcoming lecture at the Church History Library on August 14, 2014, Keepapitchinin is featuring a few selections from long-time Tabernacle organist, hymn writer, and German immigrant Alexander Schreiner (1901-1987). 

The Schreiners lived in Kattenhochstatt, Germany, but attended the Nürnberg Branch, so the picture is of Nürnberg in 1906. Eleven-year-old Alexander was serving as branch organist when his family emigrated to America. He told the following story in his biography.

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GermanyNürnberg
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We arrived in Salt Lake City on a Friday. We were welcomed by Latter-day Saints who formerly lived in Nürnberg and had immigrated previously. We loved them and we were happy, of course, to see them again. There were also former missionaries who had been in Nürnberg. We were given a warm welcome indeed.

On Sunday morning we were taken to Sunday School, and of course, someone else was playing the organ. (more…)

“A” Is for Apron: part 1

By: Ardis E. Parshall - August 11, 2014

From the Relief Society Magazine, 1959 –

“A” Is for Apron

Part I

Ilene H. Kingsbury

Hey, old woman, with the long white Apron!
What are you holding in it, your hands all bundled up inside?
Why do you walk along the shade of the poplars and pick your way so stoutly?
Hey, what are you thinking of at all?

Nudged from a memory, and rudely, to say the least, this aged woman, Clarissa by name, slackened her pace, squared her shoulders, and, for an instant, felt the tug of a remembered burden in her apron.

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“I Take Up My Pen”: Utah Indian War Veterans, 1920

By: Ardis E. Parshall - August 11, 2014

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John A. Widtsoe, “In Search of Truth”

By: Ardis E. Parshall - August 11, 2014

Aladdin had a magic lamp. The genie who was summoned by Aladdin’s rubbing of the lamp brought Aladdin incredible wealth, and arranged matters so that Aladdin married the daughter of a king. He owed everything to that lamp.

Aladdin’s wife had no idea of the significance of that old copper lamp and its powerful genie. A wicked magician did know, however, and he was determined to obtain the lamp. To do that, he disguised himself as a peddler offering to exchange new lamps for old. Foolish bride! When the magician offered her a brand new beautiful lamp in place of the battered old one, she made the exchange. The evil magician lost no time in reducing Aladdin to a beggar and enriching himself.

John A. Widtsoe used this story to begin his 1930 book In Search of Truth. This short book – only 111 pages – is written for high school or college-age students challenged by science, philosophy, and other ideas that confronted them in school. Widtsoe was proud of the youth of the Church who were willing to get an education. “The youth of our day,” he wrote, “are thinking for themselves. For that let us be grateful.”

But he saw Aladdin’s story as a cautionary tale for students. “Almost every day someone, usually honest enough, offers a new belief or thought, burnished and bright with newness, to replace convictions that we have long held and which have well maintained us. This always raises the question whether the old beliefs should be surrendered.” Don’t do it, he says, “unless we are certain that the new offerings can serve us better. A careless exchange may result in loss or fearful consequences.”

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Little Teamstress

By: Ardis E. Parshall - August 08, 2014

From the Relief Society Magazine, May 1962 –

Little Teamstress

By Frances C. Yost

We all missed Mama, but Papa missed her more than any of us. It was painful when we gathered round the table and her place was empty. I believe that is why Papa told me to sit at the foot of the table from then on. Papa always complimented me on my cooking, but I knew that, try as I could, it didn’t measure up to Mama’s. And, although I tried to, I just couldn’t glorify leftovers as Mama had.

We missed Mama, too, on Sunday. I tried to keep things washed and ironed, and buttons sewed on as Mama had, but most every Sunday something showed up needing mending, or something had been hung up instead of put in the clothes hamper, and missed the wash entirely. But we managed, and we were thankful that tiny Susan hadn’t had to go off to the city and live with Aunt Erma. We all especially enjoyed little Susan around. She had been two years old when Mama died. She was such a ray of sunshine to all of us, because she didn’t remember Mama enough to get homesick for her as the rest of us did.

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“A Little Child Shall Lead”: 2

By: Ardis E. Parshall - August 08, 2014

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Whole Year Through: Home Fire Insurance, 1904

By: Ardis E. Parshall - August 08, 2014

Home Fire Insurance was that company with a Board of Directors filled with General Authorities, and an advertising campaign filled with mini-dramas. Here are the ads of Home Fire Insurance in 1904, published in the Juvenile Instructor. (Repetitions have been omitted.)

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1 January 1904

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