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Mulek of Zarahemla: Chapter 9

By: Ardis E. Parshall - December 06, 2014

Mulek of Zarahemla

By J.N. Washburn

Previous Installment

Chapter 9

Synopsis: Mulek loved Zarahemla, the city of his forefathers, where two factions were striving for power, one ruled by Amalickiah, a man of tremendous powers and winning manners, who had caused a rupture in the country, and one by Moroni, young chief captain of the armies of the nephites, who went everywhere, encouraging, instructing, pleading with the people to unite in the country’s defense. Accustomed to receiving the adulation of the people, Mulek was consumed with jealousy at his fall from favor. In order to call attention to himself, he had mocked the priests of the church and allied himself with Amalickiah. Then, to win their praise he decided to support Moroni’s projects. Mulek was eager to win the favor of the girl, Zorah, niece of Amram, a boatmaker. He devised ways of meeting her, but Zorah was too intent on the political unrest to be interested in him, and was lavish in her praise of Moroni, which added to Mulek’s envy. He determined in some way to win Zorah’s approval. When, therefore, one of his friends approached him with the idea that he become king – even as his forefathers had been kings – he entertained the thought. A general election was granted by Pahoran, chief judge, to determine which kind of government was the more desirable. In the voting the king-men lost, at the very moment when Amalickiah led the Lamanites against the land. When the king-men were asked to support the government, they refused. Beside himself with worry, Pahoran sent word to Moroni, in the land of Bountiful, to come posthaste to the defense of Zarahemla. with great loss of life and devastation, the king-men were vanquished. Mulek, fighting to the last, was finally disarmed and dragged off to prison. While in prison he learned of the death of his mother, which aroused him to a sense of reality again. He amazed himself in the distress he felt at the advance of the Lamanites. Finally he called for a lawyer and asked whether he might not be freed to fight on the side of the Nephites. His request, not unnaturally, was denied. the prophet Shiblon called on Mulek, leaving him a copy of the Book of Mormon to read.

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Advent: Eight Pounds of Love

By: Ardis E. Parshall - December 06, 2014

From the Improvement Era, December 1964 –

Eight Pounds of Love

By Donald Coburn

The early morning sun reached across the little valley, working it way slowly down the west mountains. It silhouetted for a moment the Teton Peaks. Flanked on each side by its impressive but smaller neighbors, the main peak reached up alone and majestic into the cold, clear winter sky.

The shadows thrown across the valley by this mighty range of mountains grew ever smaller, and the morning light unveiled a beautiful little picture-book valley, Teton Valley. Ringed on all sides by it spine-covered mountains, a quiet willow-lined river wandering slowly down its length, it was truly beautiful.

This morning seemed special somehow. The smoke had started curling up from the chimneys of the scattered ranch and farmhouses even earlier than usual, and there was an unusual amount of activity, for this was the day before Christmas.

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Mulek of Zarahemla – scheduling note

By: Ardis E. Parshall - December 05, 2014

I apologize to the 6 or 7 of you reading this serial — I do not yet have the next installment ready to post. I’ll put it up as soon as I can get that far, probably tomorrow but maybe tonight.

Mormon Stuff to Give for Christmas, 1964

By: Ardis E. Parshall - December 05, 2014

From the Improvement Era, December 1964 —

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“For We Were There, Off the Shores of Kwajulane” [sic]

By: Ardis E. Parshall - December 05, 2014

Yesterday morning, after I had stopped at her desk to show her an interesting bit of history I was working on, one of the senior missionaries at the Church History Library wanted to have a show-and-tell of her own. She picked up an older book she had recently bought at DI and pulled out a piece of paper she had found folded in the pages of the book. It was a typed, then mimeographed page with the following text. (Some of you are going to recognize it almost immediately; I did not.)

Honolulu, February 8, 1944 (by United Press)

Some folks say that the day of miracles has passed. Some people say that things such as this just don’t happen, yet here’s a story which will leave you breathless and wondering – for it concerns two inconspicuous boys of the United States Marine Corps and the battle for the Marshall Islands.

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Advent: Christmas Knight

By: Ardis E. Parshall - December 05, 2014

From the Improvement Era, December 1935 –

Christmas Knight

By Sylvia Ruth Grant

Bob’s interest in the new school teacher had first been aroused by the unprecedented spectacle of Denny brushing his shaggy locks of his own free will.

Mother Lloyd, sitting at the breakfast table, had said from force of habit without glancing up, “Now, Sonny, don’t forget your hair,” and all the time Denny had been so engrossed in his labors that he hadn’t even heard her.

Bob, gazing in both amazement and amusement, had asked in mock severity, “Denfield, are you sure that you are quite well today?”

Denny always made it a point not to answer when addressed by his scorned given name so he went on serenely brushing his hair.

“Oh, I know – the lad has fallen at last for Rosie Mitchell’s black curls,” Bob went on.

“I guess not,” began Denny, “that snub-nosed, freckled faced –” he paused for lack of adjectives and breath.

“By the way,” said Bob with sudden inspiration, “Dick Crane was telling me that you kids had sure drawn a homely teacher this year.”

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Whistling Carols

By: Ardis E. Parshall - December 04, 2014

Whistling Carols

By Evelyn Fjeldsted

Up and down the street he went each night
Bicycle spinning on his route,
Whistling carols loud and clear
“Joy to the world” and “Peace on Earth.”

And as he whistled stars came out,
And blinked approval of his joy,
For David’s music long ago
Could not have brought more peace and cheer
Than David in our little town,
Whistling on his paper route.

(1962)

Merry Christmas from the Oahu Stake Presidency, 1945

By: Ardis E. Parshall - December 04, 2014

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Advent: Plympton’s Christmas

By: Ardis E. Parshall - December 04, 2014

From the Children’s Friend, December 1960

Plympton’s Christmas

By Jane Dalton Weinberger

Only five days ‘till Christmas but there was no merriment in the big white house on the top of Beach Street hill. All the Hathaways were sad, very sad.

True, they went about the business of wrapping and decorating and bringing in pine boughs. The Hathaways love holidays and have many family traditions. Each year they like to do the same special things in the same special ways, but this year John, Joel, Jerry, Jane, Jean and Judy had little heart for the preparations. There was none of the usual hilarious gaiety to make the old house ring with the happiness of the six Hathaways. And no joyous barks of Plympton joining the fun, because Plympton was missing.

Plympton, their dog, was lost. Practically everyone in the whole town was looking for him; still he stayed lost.

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Mulek of Zarahemla: Chapter 8

By: Ardis E. Parshall - December 03, 2014

Mulek of Zarahemla

By J.N. Washburn

Previous Installment

Chapter 8

Synopsis: Mulek loved Zarahemla, the city of his forefathers, where two factions were striving for power, one ruled by Amalickiah, a man of tremendous powers and winning manners, who had caused a rupture in he country, and one by Moroni, young chief captain fo the armies of the Nephites, who went everywhere, encouraging, instructing, pleading with the people to unite in the country’s defense. Accustomed to receiving the adulation of the people, Mulek was consumed with jealousy at his fall from favor. In order to call attention to himself he had mocked the priests of the church and allied himself with Amalickiah. Then, to win their praise he decided to support Moroni’s projects. Mulek was eager to win the favor of the girl, Zorah, niece of Amram, a boatmaker. He devised ways of meeting her, but Zorah was too intent on the political unrest to be interested in him, and was lavish in her praise of Moroni, which added to Mulek’s envy. He determined in some way to win Zorah’s approval. When, therefore, one of his friends approached him with the idea that he become king – even as his forefathers had been kings – he entertained the thought. A general election was called for and granted by Pahoran, chief judge, concerning which kind of government was the more desirable. In the voting the king-men lost, at the very moment when Amalickiah led the Lamanites against the land. When the king-men were asked to support the government, they refused. Beside himself with worry, Pahoran sent word to Moroni, in the land of Bountiful, to come posthaste to the defense of Zarahemla. Moroni came with all speed to the defense of the capital. With great loss of life and devastation, the king-men were vanished. Mulek, fighting to the last, was finally disarmed and dragged off to prison.

(more…)

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