Keepapitchinin, the Mormon History blog
 


Andrew Sproul, Missionary: January 1847 (part 2)

By: Ardis E. Parshall - October 05, 2014

January 13, 1847, I repaired to the place of baptism with 5. Went down into the water with Sister Mary Sprowl, my wife, & baptised her for a remission of her sins, & also Sis. Sairah Fairclough, daughter to Sis. Cowan; also Sis. Agness Harper, then I baptised my first born child, new member, Isabella, according to her desire. She is now 9 years past, as also Sis. Jannet Oatley. This sister wants the use of one of her legs, but she came forth cheerily to the water. I supported her & baptised her, & those above, for a remission of sins by the authority of Priesthood, after the order of the son of God. May he add his blessings that this may be our course to the end, in the name of Jesus, Amen.

17th [January], Sunday morning, 1847. According to information received since last Wednesday, I waited upon 4 persons this morning to go forth & administer the ordinance of baptism to three of them, & the other one, to admit her in to the church by baptism for the remission of sins. I went down into the water with Bro. David Wilkis, Deacon, & rebaptised him for remission of sins, after which I baptised Sister Elisabeth Hannah & Sister Sairah Goldie & Elisabeth Bell, new member, daughter of John Bell, Pres., who came to be adopted into the kingdom of her Lord by this ordinance. ’Twas a hard frosty morning, but a good one for us. We felt warm in doing the will of our God & thanked him for this privilege, praying him that his spirit be given to them that we have administered to in the past week & this morning to enable them to keep his commands to the end that they all may be saved in his kingdom. Amen.

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Numbering of Conference Sessions

By: Ardis E. Parshall - October 04, 2014

There has been a lot of comment and confusion over numbering designations applied to various sessions of October Conference this year. I may be shown later to be mistaken, but I think the numbering confusion can be resolved this way:

We’re using two different numbering conventions.

One convention is, in casual speech, to simply apply ordinal numbers to the sessions in their chronological order:

The Women’s Meeting was the first session of Conference.
Saturday morning was the second session of Conference.
Saturday afternoon was the third session of Conference.
The Priesthood Session was the fourth session of Conference.
Sunday morning will be the fifth session of Conference.
Sunday afternoon will be the sixth session of Conference.

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Saturday Remix, 1911

By: Ardis E. Parshall - October 04, 2014

From the pages of the Young Woman’s Journal, 1911:

The teacher was telling the story of Red Riding Hood. She had described the woods and the wild animals that live there. “Suddenly,” she said, “Red Riding Hood heard a loud noise. She turned around, and what do you suppose she saw standing there, looking at her and showing all its sharp, strong white teeth?”

“Teddy Roosevelt!” cried one of the boys.

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Stretching Dollars

By: Ardis E. Parshall - October 03, 2014

From the Relief Society Magazine, November 1931 –

Stretching Dollars

By Elaine Hyde Thomas

Esther was enjoying her new home. She enjoyed it with her eyes for it was clean and new and expressed unnumbered possibilities for adornment. She enjoyed it with her body, for though it was larger than her former home, it was arranged to require less work and it stayed clean longer. Esther appreciated these things and was happy.

As she prepared the lunch table, she heard Dan in the bed-room talking to their three months old baby Peggy.

“Peggy, O Peggy! You cute little kid, look at your dad! Like the looks of that streak of sunshine on the mirror, do you? Guess you are crazy about your surroundings like the rest of us. Well, if it hadn’t been for you, guess we’d still be in the old place. You expensive little bundle!”

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“I Take Up My Pen”: Swen Peterson, 1928

By: Ardis E. Parshall - October 03, 2014

Swen Peterson was the bishop of Sanford Ward.

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To LDS Servicemenin Italy: July 1945

By: Ardis E. Parshall - October 03, 2014

The war had ended, but American L.D.S. servicemen by the hundreds were still in Italy in July 1945, when this newsletter was issued by the two remaining chaplains.

L.D.S. Headquarters
Italy

July 1, 1945

Dear Brethren:

Since the close of the war our mailing list has dwindled from two thousand L.D.S. men to approximately four hundred. Some have left for home and some for the pacific. others are preparing to leave.

Among the departees this month are Chaplain Vern Cooley and Brother Claude Burtenshaw. Vern is headed for the Pacific via the United States and wife, Claude, for home and wife unconditionally. A heartfelt vote of thanks goes from all of us to these brethren. it has been largely their efforts that have made possible the splendid conferences, the monthly letters, and the coordination of L.D.s. work in the theater generally. We wish them much success in their activities wherever they may go.

Many of our fine group leaders and former group leaders also are on their way to other fields. We are deeply indebted for the work they have done and indebted to the Church that produces the many splendid men that it has been our privilege to meet during our overseas tour of duty.

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The Prophet Speaks

By: Ardis E. Parshall - October 02, 2014

The Prophet Speaks

By Mabel Jones Gabbott

So tall he stood there, noble, fine and proud,
Sustained by power greater than his own.
He said, “I shall not talk so very loud,”
But in his eyes a glorious message shone.
He read the excerpts that he had prepared
And then forgetting self and doctors too,
He poured his heart out to the Saints and shared
With us, his testimony stro0ng and true.

His words came freely, ringing rich and clear:
“God lives, have faith in Him, and keep His word.”
It seemed to me the Lord was very near
And prompting him to say the things we heard.
The Prophet spoke today, so kind, so dear,
And my heart prayed, “Bless President Grant, dear Lord.”

(1941)

My New Rule

By: Ardis E. Parshall - October 02, 2014

A common way for archives like the Church History Library to organize the correspondence of historical figures is to first sort the letters by year written, and then within each year sort the letters alphabetically by the name of correspondent. So, for example, if you wanted to know what Joseph F. Smith was reporting to Brigham Young while JFS was a missionary in England, you’d go to the files for 1874 and 1875, and in each of those files you would skip past all the letters written by people named Abbott and Brown and Cannon and Davis and Edwards and … down to the point where Smith fits alphabetically. Voila.

Earlier this week I was reading through the correspondence of a 20th century Church leader. In the files for 1944, and in the first folder where letters from people whose names began with A and B, I ran across letters written by James Shelby Arrigona, Jeannie Simpson Bleakley, and Carl Clifton Booth, all of whom have figured in Keepa stories. These people were scattered from Texas to Ceylon to Bikini Atoll, but they all were connected through acquaintance with this one man whose papers I was reading. When I found and wrote their stories for Keepa, I had no idea they shared this connection with one man.

That’s the way real life works. You discover that your cousin was a college roommate of your bishop’s brother, or that your sister’s new missionary companion grew up in the town where you lived in sixth grade and knows all your old school teachers and Primary classmates.

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“I Take Up My Pen”: Bannock Stake, 1896

By: Ardis E. Parshall - October 02, 2014

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The Third House Down

By: Ardis E. Parshall - October 01, 2014

From the Relief Society Magazine, May 1957 –

The Third House Down

By Florence B. Dunford

The first Grace Warren knew that their neighbors, across the street and the third house down, were moving was when she saw it in the morning Chronicle.

She looked across the breakfast table in the small, perfectly appointed dining room at her husband. “Tom, the Normans down the street are moving to California. The Whites had a neighborhood party for them last night.”

Tom, one of those good-looking homely men, looked up from his half of the paper. “Oh. How come they didn’t invite us?”

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