Keepapitchinin, the Mormon History blog
 


Saturday Remix, 1918

By: Ardis E. Parshall - February 14, 2015

A Problem

Boy: “Can a person be punished for something he hasn’t done?”

Teacher: “Of course not.”

Boy: “Well, I haven’t done my geometry.”

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Every Night at Our House

By: Ardis E. Parshall - February 13, 2015

From the Relief Society Magazine, May 1952 –

Every Night at Our House

By Thelma Hatch

We have lots of good times at our house – turkey dinners, birthday parties, blizzards, and everything that makes life full. But there is one time that will always stand out above the rest in my memory. That is bedtime.

Night begins to roll over the valley, and before we can finish our bread and milk, it drops a little darkness that hovers over our house on the hill. As Grandpa always said, it’s a good thing our house was built on a hill. Just the six of us keep its foundations rocking continually.

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February Paperdoll, 1951

By: Ardis E. Parshall - February 13, 2015

From the Children’s Friend, February 1951 —

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Sweet Ass

By: Ardis E. Parshall - February 13, 2015

While George Q. Cannon was a missionary in Hawaii in 1854, he called upon a certain Latter-day Saint at Kahakuloa. “They had a jack ass cooked,” he recorded in his journal. “It had fell down a precipice and been killed, and they ate it with excellent gusto, saying, that it excelled horse meat as much as horse meat excelled beef – beef they said was strong and not near as sweet as horse or ass.”

The Journals of George Q Cannon. Hawaiian Mission, 1850-1854, ed. by Chad M. Orton. Salt Lake City, Deseret Book, 2014, 438

O Savior Dear

By: Ardis E. Parshall - February 12, 2015

O Savior Dear

By Charles V. Anderson

O Savior dear, who bore my sin,
And bled and died that I might win
A glorious place in heav’n above –
O what a wondrous, wondrous love.

Give Thou me strength, I humbly pray,
To walk the straight and narrow way;
To bear my cross, whate’er it be,
And put my trust and hope in Thee.

O fill my soul with heaven’s light,
That I may love the cause of right,
And do Thine will, and praise Thy name,
And lift some soul from sin and shame.

And when my time shall come to go,
And leave all things on earth below,
Grant then that I Thy voice may hear,
And dwell with Thee, O Savior dear.

(1922)

Donnie’s Day — February

By: Ardis E. Parshall - February 12, 2015

From the Children’s Friend, February 1944 –
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“Cottage Meeting Outline” for Missionaries, 1951: Discussion No. 4

By: Ardis E. Parshall - February 12, 2015

Discussion No. 4

God, the Eternal Father

Objective: To show that the God described by Joseph Smith is the same as the one written of in the Old and New Testaments by the prophets of old.

1. Sin of the ages, the worship of false Gods. Ex. 20:3-4; Deut. 4:27-28. Paul on mars Hill. Acts 17:22-23. Rev. 14:6-7. It refers to the fact that none of the world’s people would be worshipping the true God “in the hour of God’s judgment” or latter days.

2. Common definition of God of Christian Churches today: “There is but one living and true God, everlasting, without body, parts or passions; of infinite power, wisdom and goodness.” Prayer Book, Art. I. A God without parts and without passions cannot be the God of the Bible. He is still an “unknown god.”

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All in a Day

By: Ardis E. Parshall - February 11, 2015

From the Relief Society Magazine, April 1939 –

All in a Day

A Play in One Act, and Two Scenes

By Rosannah C. Irvine

RUTH ARMSTRONG, a discontented young wife.
HARVEY ARMSTRONG, her husband, a struggling young lawyer.
SISTER PORTER, a wise old lady and Relief Society visiting teacher.
SISTER BALDWIN, a pleasant, middle-aged woman, also a visiting teacher.
SISTER ARMSTRONG, an understanding mother-in-law.

(The names of the characters in this play are chosen at random. If they belong to real people, it is merely a coincidence.)

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“I Take Up My Pen”: Wasatch Lawn Cemetery Association, 1915

By: Ardis E. Parshall - February 11, 2015

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“Take Care of the Children”: The 1869 Salt Lake City Measles Epidemic

By: Amy Tanner Thiriot - February 11, 2015

If three-year-old Edward Lorenzo Decker’s parents picked up the Deseret News on the day he died, they would have seen an editorial warning local parents, “Summer Diseases—Take Care of the Children.”

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1869-06-09 Summer Sickness DesNews P6 crop
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“The warm weather seems to have fairly set in,” wrote the editor, “and as is usual in the summer season, there is considerable talk around of sickness among the children.” The editor named cholera infantum, scarlet fever, and measles, and mentioned a decreasing number of small pox cases in California.

In an era and location almost devoid of public health measures, there was little Edward’s parents could have done to prevent him catching the highly infectious measles virus during the summer of 1869, and once he caught it, doctors could do nothing to treat it. (more…)

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