Keepapitchinin, the Mormon History blog
 


For This I Have Yearned

By: Ardis E. Parshall - March 09, 2015

From the Relief Society Magazine, September 1957 –

For This I Have Yearned

Mabel Law Atkinson

“There, now, Michael John Terrance, Junior. I think you look handsome enough to please Michael John, Senior, when he comes home, don’t you? You know I believe you and I together will make a rather pleasing picture to greet your father on this very special occasion.”

Margaret Terrance, who ten minutes before had been hoping and even praying that the children would stay asleep until after Michael came, so she could be looking her very prettiest to greet him, held her small son at arm’s length as she continued, “Yes, you will do nicely with your hair combed and your face shining. In fact, you are adorable, Michael John, Junior.”

“I’m Mickey, Mother. Don’t you know?”

(more…)

“I Take Up My Pen”: Browning Brothers Co., 1902

By: Ardis E. Parshall - March 09, 2015

.

.

If You’re Emigrating, Listen Up (1907)

By: Ardis E. Parshall - March 09, 2015

Although the Church began actively encouraging Later-day Saints at least by 1894 to remain at home and build up the Church in their native lands, we still conducted an active emigration well into the 20th century. If you were a European Saint who had finally saved enough money to emigrate and had made plans to leave on a certain date, these were your last-minute instructions for the voyage and for landing in the U.S.:

Advice to Intending Emigrants

We are under the necessity of repeating some instructions to Saints about to emigrate to the land of Zion. These ought to be thoroughly understood also by the presidents of conferences and the Elders laboring among Church members. A great deal of difficulty would be avoided if people would only pay close attention to advice and follow it strictly. Some of them give so little heed to what is said that it fades out of their minds as the sound of the words dies away. In making out Declarations, the blank forms furnished for the purpose should be filled accurately and with attention to every detail. Every person in a family should be named and the respective ages given, infants in arms included. Children under one year old go free in the second class on the sea; in the third class they are charged £1 sterling, but they must be named in either class; if not, there is danger of the whole family being rejected.

(more…)

Saturday Remix, 1921

By: Ardis E. Parshall - March 07, 2015

They look so formal in their black-and-white portraits — who could guess our grandparents got a kick out of these ticklers in the Church magazines of 1921?

Too Many of His Kind

“Is he a live wire?”

“No, he’s a short circuit.”

(more…)

Growing Pains

By: Ardis E. Parshall - March 06, 2015

From the Relief Society Magazine, March, 1951 –

Growing Pains

By Dorothy Clapp Robinson

Skeets heaved himself up the last two yards to the top of the hill. Safely there he stopped to blow. Bill shifted in the saddle as his glance went swiftly, then carefully, over the pageantry unfolding about him. The undulation of hills, spotted with jack pine and seamed with canyons, moved majestically among shifting cloud curtains. Nothing in sight. He reached for the glasses that hung on his saddle horn and lifted them to his eyes. Still nothing, except those warning curtains.

An aching heaviness settled the boy deeper in the saddle. Those colts must be somewhere near. For days he had ridden the lower slopes without a glimpse of them. A cold wind struck his face and his hopes soared. Maybe the wind would drive the clouds away. More likely it would close the curtain completely. Something was haywire for, with this weather, the horses should have been headed for the valley.

(more…)

Stakes of Zion, 1942

By: Ardis E. Parshall - March 06, 2015

This map shows the scant territory included within stakes in 1942 in the States circling Utah. Note that the stakes in Utah are not marked on this map; stakes in other areas, like those in California, are also not shown. Everything not shown as cross-hatched on this map was “the mission field.”

.

.

Whole Year Through: Dinwoodey Furniture Co., 1904

By: Ardis E. Parshall - March 06, 2015

Henry Dinwoodey’s Salt Lake furniture store was a major supporter of the Juvenile Instructor, its ads being prominently featured in issue after issue, year after year (I have eliminated duplicate ads from this post, which accounts for gaps). Otherwise, there’s nothing particularly Mormon about these ads – still, aren’t the illustrations great?   (more…)

Golden Rule Orphans

By: Ardis E. Parshall - March 05, 2015

Golden Rule Orphans

E. Guy Talbott

The orphan children in the far off lands
Stretch out to us their tiny pleading hands.
Across the sea we hear their plaintive cry;
Shall we to them the Golden Rule apply?

Who are these waifs afar across the sea?
What claim have they on us, that we should be
Concerned? Wait, friend, before you ridicule
An orphaned child. What says the Golden Rule?

The Golden Rule demands that we shall give
Our aid, that those about to die may live;
If we were in distress, about to die;
Would we not want someone to hear our cry?

Shall we not practice, then, the Golden Rule,
And give the orphan waifs a home and school?
They live in sacred Bible Lands afar;
To them America is Morning Star.

(1926)

“I Take Up My Pen”: Young Ladies’ Mutual Improvement Association, 1906

By: Ardis E. Parshall - March 05, 2015

.

.

Adolf Brodbeck and His Magnificent Ideas

By: Ardis E. Parshall - March 05, 2015

Adolf Brodbeck was a man of … ideas. Extraordinary ideas, it seems to me. Far-out-there ideas.

Born in Germany in October 1853, he studied philosophy and law at the University of Tübingen, “devot[ing] himsef especially to philosophic studies, including philosophy of law and history of theories of government,” and earning both a Ph.D. and an L.L.D. He later claimed to have been “Professor of Aesthetics in a Royal School of Fine Arts” in Germany, but just where or whether that was, I cannot determine.

He traveled to the U.S. in 1893, eventually making his way to Chicago to attend the Parliament of Religions held in connection with the World’s Fair – many readers will recall that this Parliament denied B.H. Roberts’ request to speak about Mormonism, and when, after appeal, they agreed to let him speak, Elder Roberts returned home rather than addressing an audience in a smaller breakout session rather than to the full Parliament in the main hall.

(more…)

« Previous PageNext Page »