Keepapitchinin, the Mormon History blog
 


Andrew Sproul, Missionary: January 1842

By: Ardis E. Parshall - July 13, 2014

previous installment

Saturday, January 1st, 1842 – E.g. & I went to Nilston & stayed with the Saints all day. E.G. had some conversation with a young man of the Methodist connection & in answering him some questions in regard to the signs which should follow believers, he said the rest of the sects would be all wrong then, but we said we could not help that, & in this conversation the Saints got more knowledge of the truth & etc. After this I read from the first No. of the Millennial Star (Church publication) first vol., a revelation copied from B. of D. & Cov. concerning the organisation of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in the U. States of America, State of New York on the sixth day of April in the year of our Lord 1830 with the duty of Elders, priests, teachers & Deacons & etc. telling them of their duty. E.G. gave out a hymn & prayed & I closed with prayer commending ourselves to God’s care. We slept at B. Shank’s house. This B. & Sister has been very kind to the Servants of the Lord. Father, reward them, we pray.

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Saturday Remix, 1944

By: Ardis E. Parshall - July 12, 2014

Too Clever

“When you stepped on that gentleman’s foot, Tommy, I hope you apologised.”

“Oh, yes, indeed I did,” said Tommy, “and he gave me sixpence for being a good boy.”

“Did he? And what did you do then?”

“Stepped on the other and apologised, but it didn’t work.”

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Too Much Freedom

By: Ardis E. Parshall - July 11, 2014

From the Relief Society Magazine, September 1936 –

Too Much Freedom

By Lucille Walker

Jane Andrews came hurrying back to her mother who was sorting letters and papers beside an open trunk.

“It’s Miss Madsen, Mother. She wants to know if you’ll come to school tomorrow to act as judge in the school play try-outs.”

“Oh, dear, I do wish no one would ask me to do another thing till I get out of this muddle! House cleaning is bad enough at best, but when you have to stop, dress up, and go somewhere everyday, it’s positively maddening. But I suppose I’ll have to go.” And Mary Andrews wearily put aside the piles of letters and prepared to go to the telephone.

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“I Take Up My Pen”: Salt Lake Knitting Works, 1906

By: Ardis E. Parshall - July 11, 2014

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Latter-day Saint Images, 1910 (2)

By: Ardis E. Parshall - July 11, 2014

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Temple Square Wall

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Vision

By: Ardis E. Parshall - July 10, 2014

Vision

By Edith Cherrington

He has grown tall, that baby boy of mine.
Those hands that one time robbed the cookie jar
Are groping now for something clean and fine.
The eyes that danced with mischief gaze afar
At argosies from some blue-misted east,
Where vague, uncharted dreams have formed a bar
That make of me a specter at the feast.

Trying to be so wise … so mother-wise
I strive in futile ways to draw him near,
Warning him where the greatest menace lies
And fighting back that surge of jealous fear,
I speak my faith in him and set him free –
And then crouched in a room grown bleak and drear
I pray that God will send him back to me.

(1931)

My Masterpiece!

By: Ardis E. Parshall - July 10, 2014

From the Improvement Era, February 1943 –

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Without Money, and Without Price

By: Ardis E. Parshall - July 10, 2014

William C. Dunbar (1822-1905), born in Inverness, Scotland, a perpetual missionary for many years, had already been a member of the Church for ten years by the time he penned this 1850 article for the Millennial Star.

Without Money, and Without Price

In my travels among the Saints I have heard the above text often made use of; some through ignorance, and others, because they have small contracted nut-shell souls.

The Saints generally are, though poor, a benevolent, kind, and open-hearted people, and considering their limited means, it is almost astonishing to see what they can accomplish. But scattered among them are a few drones, who, while others are putting their hand to the work, go buzzing about, and will not be content themselves, neither will they allow others to be, if they can help it; and when an elder makes his wants known in the shape of a coat, pair of shoes, or travelling expenses, or if the president of a conference requires means to take him to the valley, the grumbler buttons up his pocket, opens his eyes as if quite surprised, and exclaims – “The apostles preached without money, and without price. I thought when I came into this church, I would have nothing to pay.”

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Happy Ending

By: Ardis E. Parshall - July 09, 2014

From the Relief Society Magazine, November 1943 –

Happy Ending

By Rosa Lee Lloyd

Kirk had always loved Linda’s dark hair. Now his hard hand touched it reverently, almost as a small son would smooth a mother’s forehead.

“How about it, Belinda?” he asked, eagerly.

“All right, Kirk. I can’t argue with you anymore – not in that uniform. So if that’s the way you want it – we’ll have a wedding.”

“That’s the way I want it.” His brown eyes teased her. “Never argue with a top sergeant: especially on his first furlough. Remember I had to be plenty tough to win these stripes.”

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“I Take Up My Pen”: Juvenile Instructor, 1929

By: Ardis E. Parshall - July 09, 2014

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