Keepapitchinin, the Mormon History blog
 


Little Gus

By: Ardis E. Parshall - February 18, 2015

From the Improvement Era, June 1953 –

Little Gus

By Ora Pate Stewart

Janice Potter raised her sleeping baby and pressed her face against his fat little neck. He smelled so sweet with powder rubbed into the top half of him and oil smoothed over the lower half. She usually didn’t bathe him at night; but lately she had taken to putting him in the big tub last thing and letting him soak and splash and get a last workout, then rocking him to sleep. Most of the girls she knew just put their babies to bed at night and shut the door; but she had found that he slept better after this ritual; and it was something to do. There was plenty to do, but this was something you could do with somebody. The evenings weren’t so lonely this way – not until eight o’clock anyway!

Janice laid the infant tenderly in his crib and drew the sheet and one blanket up over him. It was spring now. One blanket would be enough.

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Photoshop Like It’s 1922

By: Ardis E. Parshall - February 18, 2015

In 1922, the Deseret News photographer couldn’t get a good picture of the scenery erected inside the Tabernacle for a pageant that was then being staged … so they just drew the scenery onto a photograph of the Tabernacle interior.

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“To do away with the motley array …”

By: Ardis E. Parshall - February 18, 2015

We’ve talked about this kind of thing before, and I hope you don’t find it monotonous, but I remain fascinated by the early 20th century tendency toward adding unnecessary ritual to the administration and passing of the sacrament. This account from 1933, from a ward in the Salt Lake Valley, adds several details – positioning the deacons according to height, for instance – to what we’ve seen in previous accounts. I wonder how far it would have gone had not the Presiding Bishop, two years following this report, to avoid the formalism of deacons’ uniforms?

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I’m a Saint, I’m a Saint

By: Ardis E. Parshall - February 17, 2015

I’m a Saint, I’m a Saint

By John Lyon

I’m a Saint, I’m a saint, on the rough world wide,
The earth is my home, and my God is my guide!
Up, up with the truth, let its power bend the knee:
I am sent, I am sent, and salvation is free.
I fear not old priestcraft, its dogmas can’t awe:
I’ve a chart for to steer by, that tells me the law, –
And ne’er as a coward to falsehood I’ll kneel,
While Mormon tells truth, or God’s prophets reveal!
Up, up with the truth, let its power touch the mind,
And I’ll warrant we’ll soon leave the selfish behind.
Up, up with the truth, let its power bend the knee, –
I am sent! I am sent! dying Bab’lon to thee,
I am sent! I am sent! take this warning and flee.

The arm of the tyrant, fell terror may spread,
Yet, tho’ they oppose us, their strongholds we’ll tread,
What to us is the scorn of the selfish and vain,
We have borne it before, and we’ll bear it again.
The fire gleaming bolts of oppression may fall,
And kill off the body, death can’t us appal!
With Heaven above us, and all Hell mad below!
Thro’ the wide field of error, right onward we’ll go.
Come on! my brave comrades, now’s the time you should speak:
The storm-fiend is roused from his long dreamy sleep.
Our watchword for safety in Zion shall be
I am sent! I am sent! dying Bab’lon to thee, –
I am sent! I am sent! take this warning and flee.

(1850)

Outdoor Baptism, 1940

By: Ardis E. Parshall - February 17, 2015

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Selena Frances Hutchens Venable
10 February 1863 – 29 October 1962
baptized 1940, Mt. Airy, North Carolina
(Elder David L. Hiatt)

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Edna Crowther’s Interview: A Sister Missionary in Brooklyn, 1915

By: Ardis E. Parshall - February 17, 2015

A recent Nightline episode focusing on six sister missionaries has received popular attention in the past two weeks. A hundred years ago – almost exactly a hundred years ago, in late February 1915 – the media spotlight was on two sister missionaries serving in Brooklyn, New York.

The pair were Edna Crowther, 22, of Malad, Idaho, and Gertrude Phelps, 19, of Salt Lake City, Utah. “Every day and all day long in their efforts to make converts to the Mormon Church,” wrote 37-year-old Wilma Pollock of the New York World, “they make a house-to-house canvass through the Ridgewood section of Brooklyn. They call one, two or three times upon each woman. If not admitted, they do not attempt to go to that particular house again.”

Wanting to interview the sisters, the reporter called on them at their boarding place (that’s 1262 Jefferson avenue, for local readers – tip your hat if you happen to pass that address). As with the recent video, there was interest in the sisters’ surroundings and personal appearance. Edna Crowther (Sister Phelps was out – the “never leave your companion rule” was not then in effect) was “a tall, striking, rosy-cheeked girl, with pretty features, offset by soft brown ringlets escaping from a fetching boudoir cap.” Her room proved that Edna was “a real, live, human girl, with all the interests and vanities of any other damsel of her age. There were pictures, books, flowers, an open hymn book, a sewing machine and two or three frocks on which she was sewing” – evidently her proselyting didn’t quite take up “every day and all day long”:

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The Intruder

By: Ardis E. Parshall - February 16, 2015

From the Relief Society Magazine, October 1946 –

The Intruder

Margery S. Stewart

The telephone rang just as Carol was coming downstairs. With a wondering look at the hall clock, she went to answer it.

It was Naida, more breathless than usual. “Carol, darling, I know it’s practically the break of day, but Mabel Corless told me she saw you up at Doctor Thorpe’s office and I just couldn’t wait to find out what …”

Carol chuckled. “I’m going to have a baby.”

“A baby!” Naida’s shriek made Carol hold the phone away from her ear. “A baby! Good heavens! Why, you’re thirty-six.”

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“I Take Up My Pen”: Swiss Mission, 1901

By: Ardis E. Parshall - February 16, 2015

The example I had of this letterhead was especially messy with text I had to remove. In particular, the letterwriter was writing from Geneva, so had crossed out “Bern” and written “Geneve” above it. My restoration of the “Bern” is particularly clumsy, but you get the idea of how this letterhead should look, I hope.

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In Our Ward: Lesson 7: “[He] Took Our Infirmities, and Bore Our Sicknesses”

By: Ardis E. Parshall - February 15, 2015

Lesson 7: “[He] Took Our Infirmities, and Bore Our Sicknesses”

Mark 1-5

Purpose: To help class members understand some of the reasons the Savior performed miracles.

Scripture Discussion and Application:

1. Jesus travels through Galilee teaching the gospel and performing miracles.
2. Jesus forgives a man’s sins and heals the man of palsy.
3. Jesus calms the sea, casts out devils, and raises the son of the widow of Nain from the dead.
4. Jesus heals a woman with an issue of blood and raises Jairus’s daughter from the dead.

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Saturday Remix, 1918

By: Ardis E. Parshall - February 14, 2015

A Problem

Boy: “Can a person be punished for something he hasn’t done?”

Teacher: “Of course not.”

Boy: “Well, I haven’t done my geometry.”

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