Keepapitchinin, the Mormon History blog
 


Unfold the Spirit

By: Ardis E. Parshall - May 21, 2015

From 1928 —

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She Shall Be an Ensign: The Princess in the Tower

By: Ardis E. Parshall - May 21, 2015

“I suppose every Mormon woman has measured herself at one time or another against ‘the pioneers,’” Laurel Thatcher Ulrich once wrote. “Am I as stalwart? As self-reliant? As devoted to the gospel? As willing to sacrifice? Could I crush my best china to add glitter to a temple,1 bid loving farewell to a missionary husband as I lay in a wagon bed with fever and chills, leave all that I possessed and walk across the plains to an arid wilderness?” She says that her “full pedigree of handcart-pushing, homesteading grandmothers” may have been the reason she said to her obstetrician as she was being wheeled into a state-of-the-art delivery room, “I never would have made a pioneer!”2

I suppose a lot of us have this idea in the back of our minds that “I could never have been a pioneer.” Our mental image of the pioneer woman, able to meet confidently and competently every unimaginable hardship, with a song on her lips and a prayer in her heart as she tucked a stray wisp of hair under her clean, pressed, and starched sunbonnet, is one that has grown in our minds from our earliest Primary stories. In contrast to their stalwart example, we have trouble coping with toddlers and dinner and visiting teaching, and if we could even find the sunbonnet in the laundry basket, it most definitely wouldn’t be ironed and starched.

But of course our image of the pioneer woman isn’t an accurate one. That pioneer woman is more akin to the Princess in the Tower of fairy tale – the beautiful, perfect lady, aloof from the dirt and chores of real life, the ideal woman (with “idea-l” meaning she is an idea and not a reality) who alternately inspires and intimidates us. Too often, the women in our published Church histories are as aloof and unknowable as the Princess in the Tower.

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  1. We now know that this long-believed story of Kirtland’s women “crushing their best china” to be mixed into plaster for the Kirtland Temple is not historically accurate, but it still works as a metaphor. []
  2. Laurel Thatcher Ulrich, “A Pioneer Is Not a Woman Who Makes Her Own Soap,” Ensign, June 1978, ____. []

The Shining Heart: Chapter 2

By: Ardis E. Parshall - May 20, 2015

The Shining Heart

By Sibyl Spande Bowen

(Previous chapter)

Chapter Two

CHARACTER DESCRIPTION AND RESUME—1ST INSTALLMENT

In the moldy decay of the old family mansion on Puget Sound lives

“MISS BRILL” CAREY, spinster of 55, christened Brilliant Alaska in honor of her birthplace, and earning a sparse living as a seamstress. Her interest in life is centered in her niece, red-haired

NELL CAREY, who has ambition to be an artist. Lack of means to study and the opposition of her fiance are defeating the cause of art and hastening the day of her marriage to

FRED NAGLE, practical, unromantic young chicken farmer, who believes money should stay in the bank and a woman should stay in the home. He is determined to see that Nell finds her place in his home.

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Sugar: Don’t Waste It — But Buy Extra and Use All You Can

By: Ardis E. Parshall - May 20, 2015

From 1942 —

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She Shall Be an Ensign: Damsels in Distress

By: Ardis E. Parshall - May 20, 2015

So far in this series we have looked at the relatively scant attention given to individual women in general histories of the Church (acknowledging that much fine work has been done in the realm of biography and on the Relief Society organization), and to one way in which individual women are included in Mormon history (in the less than flattering role of “wicked witches”). Before continuing, I should perhaps clarify that I don’t find anything inherently wrong in either practice: If women’s contributions to the rise and development of the Kingdom have been almost exclusively in the domestic sphere, then we wouldn’t expect to find them in histories of the more public sphere. I don’t happen to believe that is true – I think it more likely that women’s actions, both public and domestic, haven’t always been recognized as significant contributions to the Kingdom, or that historians have had a little difficulty shaking off the old habits of thought that the only history that matters is made by kings and presidents and generals.

Likewise, there is nothing wrong with historians’ writing about women who have played negatives roles in Church history. Negative actions shouldn’t be omitted out of some misplaced sense of chivalry when they did have an effect on the course of the Church – Miss or Mrs. Hubble did cause confusion in the Church at Kirtland, and was a proximate cause of Joseph’s seeking divine wisdom in the proper order within the Church. That event, and Ms. Hubble’s involvement, is a legitimate event for inclusion in published histories. As Keepa’s readers have pointed out in the discussion following that post when discussing Emma Smith’s shifting reputation, no story about any person’s role in Church history is complete without recognizing the broader circumstances of that person’s life, and the effect of that person’s actions on the Church and its other members.

That brings us to a second and very common way in which women appear in Church history: as Damsels in Distress, facing persecution in the Midwest, harsh physical conditions in the West, and the scorn of the world in all times and places.

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Rain Maker

By: Ardis E. Parshall - May 19, 2015

Rain Maker

By Thelma Ireland

Scientists can now bring rain.
This fact has brought them fame.
But let me hang my washing out,
And I can do the same.

(1948)

Young Woman’s Journal, May 1911

By: Ardis E. Parshall - May 19, 2015

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Eva Rowe Salway: She Raised a Family, and a Branch

By: Ardis E. Parshall - May 19, 2015

“I was brought up a Baptist,” Eva Rowe Salway wrote to a granddaughter in 1946, “and was always interested in religion, but somehow I could not swallow hell, and the three-in-one doctrine. … After my marriage I stopped that church and tried many others.”

Eva tried Evangelist meetings, and, after leaving her native Guernsey for Southampton, England, she went to the Church of England. She was bitterly disappointed when the preacher of one congregation told her she was “saved,” when she felt no different from before. “I left his home broken-hearted. I had asked for bread, and he had given me a stone. … When my brother was baptized, I felt that if I was baptized I would then feel saved. Perhaps that was what I was missing. I was baptized, but I was in deeper despair than ever after the excitement and novelty was over. I took a class in Sunday school, went to prayer meeting and took part, but gradually fell away.”

She again“went to the Baptist church, but they talked over my head. Went to Plymouth Brethren – I think I liked them best as they seemed more sincere as a congregation. I did not bother with the Catholics then, as I had often gone as a visitor with friends. I tried Wesleyan – they had a good choir, a good preacher and was close to home. … Then I went to an undenominational church. … How I longed for a church! I was surrounded by them, but could find none for me.”

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The Shining Heart: Chapter 1 (of 9)

By: Ardis E. Parshall - May 18, 2015

From the Relief Society Magazine, 1939 –

The Shining Heart

By Sibyl Spande Bowen

Chapter One

Before old Philander Maddox would consent to come North and visit his son Tom and his family, he had to be assured that every last vestige of the old family mansion he himself had built in the first flush of his Alaska prosperity had been demolished. He had to know that the face of the estate had been changed entirely by the huge Georgian brick house and the expensive landscaping Tom had undertaken this last year.

The place was finished now, and old Philander sat upon its western terrace facing a superb June sunset on Puget Sound, listening to the soothing and unimportant chatter of Tom’s plump wife, Phoebe, and telling himself that if a man is to keep himself young in this rushing world he has to clear the decks of the old things every so often and surround himself with the new. And old Philander was convinced he had indeed hoodwinked time with the clean sweep of the new house.

The lawns of Oakwood sloped in an almost unbroken expanse of beautiful sod to the beach, where it was separated from the public footpath by a hedge of shrubs. As old Phil gazed over the crimsoned water with his clear, hard, blue eyes, he sat suddenly upright and snorted.

“There’s that old pest Brill Carey coming along the path, Phoebe, or I’m a walrus,” he grumbled, and attempted to get up. “I’m going in.”

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Pioneer Art Gallery

By: Ardis E. Parshall - May 18, 2015

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