Keepapitchinin, the Mormon History blog
 


Neighbors

By: Ardis E. Parshall - January 27, 2015

Neighbors

By Ora Pate Stewart

I have no right
to take your house apart.
But if it falls,
I will help you build
a better one.
I have no right
to trammel your faith.
But if it fails,
I will comfort you
with mine.

In neighborliness,
I ask the same
of you.

(1946)

For a Snowy Afternoon

By: Ardis E. Parshall - January 27, 2015

Something to amuse your kids, from the Children’s Friend, January 1947 —

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In His Own Words: Frank Warren Smith (scientist, hermit, Latter-day Saint)

By: Ardis E. Parshall - January 27, 2015

Frank Warren Smith (1863-1946) was a native of Pennsylvania. He was a scientist, having earned a Master’s degree in chemistry from Harvard, followed by additional study in France and Germany. He authored several works on chemistry – at least one of which was a standard textbook at Harvard – and he amassed a large collection of scientific books, primarily chemistry, which he donated to Brigham Young University after he was converted to the Church.

F.W. Smith’s health – both mental and physical – was always somewhat fragile. Seeking a warm climate and privacy, he settled in Sinaloa, Mexico, in 1915, where he lived more or less as a hermit. He studied native plants, raised an extraordinary garden, specializing in exotic fruits, and, with his knowledge of chemistry, informally doctored his Mexican neighbors. Once in Mexico, he had little direct contact with the Church but faithfully paid his tithing by checks through the mail. Despite the poverty that came with his self-sufficient but low-income desert lifestyle, he somehow managed to travel occasionally – to Salt Lake, to Pennsylvania, to Italy, to England. He planned other trips that never came to be, when his nerves and breathing difficulties kept him at home in Mexico.

He carried on long correspondence (long letters, over long periods) with a few friends who appreciated or at least tolerated his quirky, sometimes incomprehensible rambling letters. On other occasions, his letters are completely lucid – any difficulty in understanding him then is due to obscure allusions, sophisticated topics, and complex sentence structure.

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Windy Hilltop – chapter 1 (of 3)

By: Ardis E. Parshall - January 26, 2015

After pressuring her husband to promise to sell the homestead and take their young family back to the city, Anne Raines unexpectedly finds herself responsible for running the farm all summer.

From the Relief Society Magazine, 1948 –

Windy Hilltop

By Ezra J. Poulsen

Chapter 1

“This chilly wind ruins my complexion,” Anne Raines often complained.

“Well, it’s clean, and if your complexion is real, the wind won’t hurt it,” her husband, Joe Raines, habitually bantered.

There was no argument over such a trivial matter. In fact, more often than not, there was laughter, for Joe and Anne were young, and very much in love. Nevertheless, there were basic strains of difference in their make-up, which made it hard for them to adjust – especially for Anne to adjust – to the environment of their homestead tucked away in the foothills.

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Manti Temple, 1888

By: Ardis E. Parshall - January 26, 2015

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Guest Post: Pickled Grapes

By: Amy Tanner Thiriot - January 26, 2015

Yes, you read that right. Pickled grapes.

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The Washington County Historical Society (WCHS) runs an email list notifying members of events and sending out questions from time to time. Over the weekend Victor Hall posed a question about the preserved grapes he remembered his mother, Hannah Crosby Hall, mentioning from her childhood. He noted:

…an earthen crock was filled with grapes over which either sorghum molasses or else vinegar was poured and was stored in the cool cellar. The grapes underwent a dramatic change in taste but adults enjoyed them as a treat and my mother might be sent for some when company came. She never developed a taste for them. Does someone know if it was sorghum molasses, or if was vinegar that was used as the preservative?

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In Our Ward: Lesson 4: “Prepare Ye the Way of the Lord”

By: Ardis E. Parshall - January 25, 2015

Lesson 4: “Prepare Ye the Way of the Lord”

Matthew 3-4
John 1
Mark 1
Luke 3

Purpose: To inspire class members to draw near to the Savior by repenting of their sins, keeping their baptismal covenants, and withstanding temptation.

Lesson Development

1. John the Baptist prepares the way of the Lord Jesus Christ.
2. Jesus is baptized by John the Baptist.
3. Jesus withstands Satan’s temptations in the wilderness.
4. Some of John the Baptist’s disciples decide to follow Jesus.
1. Insights from the Savior’s baptism
2. Jesus shows respect and love for his mother
3. Jesus shows reverence as he cleanses the temple

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Funny Bones, 1905

By: Ardis E. Parshall - January 24, 2015

These antique examples of the humor of our grandparents are new-to-Keepa today – they aren’t recycled from earlier posts. Hip, hip, hurray! (Or three groans, if they’re that bad.)

–oooOoooo–

Smith – “If a Filipino ate his father and mother, would would he be?” Brown guesses “Full,” then “Cannibal,” then gives up. Smith – “Ha! ha! old man, an orphan, of course.”

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The Striped Pencil

By: Ardis E. Parshall - January 23, 2015

Judith has to study it out in her own mind before the burden of guilt is lifted from her nine-year-old shoulders.

From the Relief Society Magazine, October 1941 –

The Striped Pencil

By Eva Willes Wangsgaard

“I’ll give it to you now, Celinda,” and Judith Rawson twirled a red, white, and blue pencil in her small fingers.

“But I don’t want it,” Celinda said, and she tossed her light brown ringlets in emphasis.

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The First Snow Vision

By: Ardis E. Parshall - January 23, 2015

In Rexburg, Idaho (from Jenna Galbraith Wood via Tom Kimball) —

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