Keepapitchinin, the Mormon History blog
 


Maria Either: Wartime Caretaker

By: Ardis E. Parshall - June 18, 2015

I apologize for neglecting Keepa so badly this week — it may be the end of next week before I catch up with myself and can get back on schedule. In the meantime, here is something I posted last night on the Facebook page for She Shall Be an Ensign. (All other sketches posted there are shorter versions of stories that have been posted earlier to Keepa.

-oooOooo-

World War I erupted with startling rapidity in the late summer of 1914. Latter-day Saint missionaries were withdrawn from active war zones as quickly as possible, although a few missionaries would remain in Great Britain and Scandinavia throughout the war. As the elders – and they were all elders, not sisters – left from Germany, Austria, Poland, Lithuania, and other parts of Europe, they appointed priesthood holders in each branch to keep the Saints together and continue the Church organization as well as they could.

In Vienna, Austria, there was no priesthood holder who could be called to guide the small branch there. Instead, the elders appointed Sister Maria Either, a woman in her early 60s, to safeguard the branch records and to do what she could to stay in touch with her fellow Saints until missionaries returned after the war.

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I Never See the Like

By: Ardis E. Parshall - June 16, 2015

I Never See the Like

By W.W. Phelps

There is nothing like the Mormons,
For they go at God’s command,
And they scale the highest mountains,
And they compass sea & land

So they cope with every nation
And the Christian’s cannons spike,
For the power of God is with them,
O, I never see the like.

Where the Eagle spreads his pinions
And the gilded Christians boast,
There the “Mormon” Elder teaches
What the Gentiles dread the most.

So they cope, &c

Where the British lion treadeth
With the fleet Unicorn,
There the Mormon Elder reasons
For the resurrection morn.

So they cope, &c

Where the heathen gropes in darkness
In the scarlet lady’s ward,
There the Mormon Elder meekly
Lights the candle of the Lord.

So they cope, &c

And they bring the rescued captives
To the Zion harvest bowers.
Yeah in hand-carts see them coming
To this goodly land of ours.

So they cope, &c

Light and glory to the Mormons,
Like the yonder brilliant Sun,
With their fountains never measured,
Shining for more worlds than one.

So they cope with every nation
And the Christian cannons spike,
For the power of God is with them,
O, I never see the like.

(unknown date)

The Swedes among Us

By: Ardis E. Parshall - June 16, 2015

… at least I think this is Swedish. I don’t have a date, don’t know how or by whom it was distributed, but like this reminder of a time in the late 19th century when so many Saints had gathered from other lands that businesses found it profitable to advertise in the languages of those new immigrants.

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The Bible in Our Literature: Lesson 4: Bible Influence as Revealed in Our Narrative and Epic Poetry

By: Ardis E. Parshall - June 16, 2015

I wanted to write a real post this morning, but I have to leave the house so early that it didn’t get done. Sorry.

THE BIBLE IN OUR LITERATURE

Dr. Howard R. Driggs

Lesson 4 – Bible Influence as Revealed in Our Narrative and Epic Poetry

For Tuesday, January 22, 1946

Chaucer, often called the father of English literature, gave us in his Canterbury Tales outstanding narrative poetry. In this group of stories, preserved vibrantly by a literary master, we have an artistic portrayal of England in the Middle Ages. With picturesque old English, which, well-voiced, brings a charm and flavor of it sown, the poet tells of “nyne and twenty in a companye of sondry folk” who are making a pilgrimage about Easter time to pay homage to a “holy blissful martyr” who has “holpen hem (them) whan that they been seke (sick).” To while time away on the long journey to and from Canterbury, the travelers relate favorite tales. These, like the different storytellers, mirror the spirit, the custom, the people of that “olden tyme.”

Naturally, with such personages as a prioress, a nun, a monk, a pardoner, a friar, and a poor parson, in the company, we are brought closer to the religious thought and practices of those days. Chaucer, a keen observer, sketches these vivid characters in his prologue with artistry. He pictures the prioress as demure and neat and cultured. There are poetic shafts aimed at the monk who in this case was not pale and studious, but worldly and well fed. For show and sham and abuses of religion, the poet reveals little patience. His ire flames especially at the pardoner who went about selling indulgences, preying upon the poor and rich alike. For the poor parson, however, he has nothing but praise. “Riche he was in holy thought and work,” says the poet; and further:

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The Call of the Land

By: Ardis E. Parshall - June 15, 2015

From the Relief Society Magazine, 1933 –

The Call of the Land

By Agnes Just Reid

When Barbara Wentworth was left alone with four small children, people wondered what she would do. There was no insurance, for never in his life had Nat Wentworth been considered a safe risk for the insurance companies. In war time he had only gone as far as the training camp, to be told what he already knew, that his heart was likely to play out almost any minute. So, after nine years of anxiety, interspersed with much happiness, the blow had fallen and Barbara was alone.

“Poor Babs,” everyone said, “will have to go back to teaching school; and who will rear those babies for her?”

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Symbol of Thrift

By: Ardis E. Parshall - June 15, 2015

From August, 1948 —

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A Few Minutes with the Kanab Stake Security Program Committee, 1937

By: Ardis E. Parshall - June 15, 2015

The “Security Plan” was soon renamed the “Welfare Plan” of the Church. Here’s a glimpse at its earliest functioning in one stake, in Southern Utah —

25 April 1937

At Stake Union Meeting at Kanab Apr 25, 1937. Stake Security Program Committee met at 3:45 P.M., Pres. Chas. C. Heaton presiding. Bsp. Quimby Roundy conducting, chairman.

Bishop Roundy suggested that steps be taken to obtain long term leases on land donated or turned over to the Stake Security Program, in order that they may be properly improved with the idea of getting the most out of them. It was suggested that in many cases work or caretakers could be furnished for these tract of land by men with families, who would care for and cultivate these tracts of land for their clothes and food. It would of course be understood that if they could obtain better employment from other sources, making them self-sustaining, that they would be released from these projects, if they so desired.

The following persons were selected to act as a Committee to investigate and purchase a tractor, to be used in our Stake for the Security program. This committee was also instructed to consider other projects feasible for our stake and take the matter of commencing them up with Brother [Harold B.] Lee immediately. Among those considered were the Power project in Long Valley, a Central Storehouse in Long Valley, a storage plant in Kanab, on the old Mill Site, purchasing or leasing the Alton Creamery from Floyd Heaton, or encouraging the raising and producing of milk to help this creamery to operate, thereby furnishing an outlet for milk in the Stake and bringing in a little cash.

It was motioned by President Carroll that this committee consider all projects to be self liquidating.

It was recommended by Pres. Heaton that immediate action be taken on the projects for our Stake, especially where farming is concerned.

Projects committee appointed: President Woodruff Rust, Bishop Rulon J. Carroll and Bishop Quimby Roundy.

Adjourned.

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Saturday Remix, 1894 (2)

By: Ardis E. Parshall - June 13, 2015

Prisoner at the bar, to magistrate: “Your worship, would you mind hurrying up my case a little? It’s almost twelve o’clock, and if I’ve got to go to jail, I’d like to get there in time for dinner.”

—oooOooo—

It was that most cruel and distressing occasion – an examination. The examiner was the principal, a rather severe looking gentleman, who concealed his heart most successfully. “If,” he began, in a very serious tone, “your mother gave you fifty cents and sent you to the store to buy six pounds of codfish at eight cents per pound, how much change would you take home?”

The small boy to whom this question was put responded at once, “Not any.”

“Not any? Would the codfish cost fifty cents?”

“No, sir: forty-eight.”

“Would there not be some change?”

“Yes, sir; two cents. But I would buy candy. I would not take any home.”
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Karren

By: Ardis E. Parshall - June 12, 2015

Don’t be afraid to read this, mamas.

From the Relief Society Magazine, May 1953 –

Karren

By Blanche M. Hollingsworth

The rain still beat against the windowpane. Only this morning she had said in her cute two-year-old way, “What’s ‘at?” and I had answered, “It’s the rain on the window. It looks like tears. I guess the sky is crying.” Very seriously she had watched the drops of rain hit the top of the window and slowly trickle down the pane.

Now, as I wandered alone through the house, I felt almost lost in my own home. Everything I looked at reminded me of her. In the living room four little finger marks were visible on the door just under the knob where plump fingers had held on, waiting to wave goodbye to Earl as he drove away to work this very morning.

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Tabernacle Interior, 1880

By: Ardis E. Parshall - June 12, 2015

Tabernacle acoustics have not always been as perfect as the stories of pin-dropping suggest. That loopy cable, whatever material it is made of, is just one of several early attempts to improve acoustics by hanging things from the ceiling (I don’t understand the principle). That is a water fountain you see in the middle of the seating; it was installed for the Sunday School Jubilee in 1880 and is probably the reason this photo was taken. I don’t know when it was removed — it stayed in place for several years, and once in a while you run across a reference to the cooling properties of fountain. It is surrounded by four stone lions. And of course, the organ looks a little odd because it had not yet been expanded to its current configuration with those huge iconic pipes on either side, crowned with carved woodwork.

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