Keepapitchinin, the Mormon History blog
 


Milestone

By: Ardis E. Parshall - May 03, 2015

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Saturday Remix, 1907 (2)

By: Ardis E. Parshall - May 02, 2015

Spicy

It made the young recruit hot.
No wonder he was flustered,
The foeman peppered him with shot,
Right after he was mustered.

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Heart’s Bounty, Chapter 3

By: Ardis E. Parshall - May 01, 2015

Heart’s Bounty

By Deone R. Sutherland

Previous chapter

Chapter 3

Synopsis: Annie Griffith, whose father, with his family, has been called on a mission to the mountains to cut stone for the temple, is living with the Williams family in Salt Lake City, and is being educated with Marie Williams under the direction of a private tutor. Both Annie and Marie are very much interested in a neighbor, Parker Josephson, who leaves to attend an eastern university to learn to be a teacher of science. A farewell dinner for Parker is given at the Williams home, and Annie and Marie give him, as a going-away remembrance, a shirt which they have made. Both the girls are lonely after Parker has left, but they continue their studies, and finally a letter arrives from Parker, addressed to both of the girls.

The next two years passed quickly. Marie’s seventeenth birthday was celebrated with a party in the Williams’ home. Both girls had put their hair up, Annie, reluctantly, because Marie insisted.

“Annie is content,” Marie exclaimed, “to stay looking like a little girl for the next ten years.”

“It’s not that,” Annie said. “I just don’t think it matters too much.”

“Matters!” Marie exclaimed. “Look in the glass and see how much it matters!”

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Fill ‘er Up

By: Ardis E. Parshall - May 01, 2015

From 1928 —

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You Have Been Listening to the First Latter-day Saint Radio Broadcast (6 May 1922)

By: Ardis E. Parshall - May 01, 2015

In March 1922, the Improvement Era carried a short article by editor Edward H. Anderson about the exciting possibilities of the newly invented vacuum tube amplifier – those glass tubes seen inside antique radios and other early- to mid-20th century gadgets. Such tubes amplified electric signals to such an extent that for the very first time, the human voice could be heard by telephone from one coast to the other. Why, Bro. Anderson wrote, “It is not impossible that, by 1925, or sooner, the President of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints may be able to deliver his sermons in the Salt Lake Tabernacle and be heard by congregations assembled in every settlement of the Church from Canada to Mexico, and from California to Colorado.”

Two months later, on Saturday, 6 May 1922, the next step in fulfilling that prophecy took place as a small group of men and women gathered on the roof of the Deseret News Building on Salt Lake City’s South Temple street, to inaugurate radio station KZN – now KSL. This post is an attempt to reconstruct that initial broadcast, the earliest known broadcast of LDS teachings. (The Deseret News had, however, been broadcasting a nightly 9:00 newscast since 22 November 1920, using the facilities of station 6ZM; no record exists of their having broadcast Mormon content.)

At 8:00 p.m., Nathan O. Fullmer, business manager of the Deseret News, stepped to the microphone. Nate had worked for months with engineer Harry Carter Wilson to build a transmitter from scratch (AT&T’s monopoly on the sales of transmitters made purchasing a transmitter too expensive for either the newspaper or the Church), and he opened the program with this announcement1:

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  1. The contemporary Deseret News article reports it was “Flash” Wilson who spoke these words. That is the most immediate report, but all other sources credit Nate Fullmer. I think it more likely that Nate Fullmer, as Deseret News management, was the speaker, and that Flash Wilson was probably too busy with the technical work to speak.

    In any case, Jack Cannon, the Deseret News’ reporter on the roof that night, felt the thrill of the technological progress: “The Deseret News entered the radio field on November 2, 1920. At that time was furnished a nightly broadcast of news items by telegraph. It was soon observed that the installation of a radio phone, whereby all could be listeners regardless of knowledge of codes, would be a wonderful step forward. To this end The News commenced installation of the first big radio phone in Utah about three months ago. Operator Wilson and his force of assistants have for the past few weeks been working on the machine day and night in order to have it ready for today’s dedication.” []

Self-Righteous

By: Ardis E. Parshall - April 30, 2015

Self-Righteous

By Florence Hartman Townsend

I took out all my little faults
And laundered them so clean,
And hung them in the sun
Where they could all be seen.

My neighbor, too, was laundering;
Her faults hung on the line.
And though I wouldn’t have you tell,
Her faults are worse than mine!

Why did she stare so when she saw
My faults so small and fair?
And give her faults a little pat,
With a sort of prideful air?

(1942)

Primary Burlesque

By: Ardis E. Parshall - April 30, 2015

Burlesque: A comical imitation, in this case, children’s voices mimicking the music of band instruments.

From the Children’s Friend, January 1928 –

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Guest Post: Samuel Jepperson, Provo Primitive

By: Glen Nelson - April 30, 2015

This post originally published at Mormon Artists Group in February 2013.

Samuel Jepperson, Provo Primitive

“I no longer set the price [for my paintings]. I am always happy to sell one, for that means I can make another. When I do not sell and find myself short, I scrape off an old one or paint it over, for I must paint.” – Samuel Jepperson1

The parents of Samuel Jepperson landed in Provo, Utah in 1858, shortly after their conversion to Mormonism in Denmark and their immigration to the United States. Samuel was born in Copenhagen in 1854. From an early age, he showed interest in the arts, but his father would have none of it. The young boy drew in the margins of his school books and on any available scrap of paper. Without money to purchase supplies, Jepperson made himself a paintbrush by tying chicken feathers to a stick. And he mixed paints using berries, roots, leaves, and mustard.2 He was equally drawn to music, and using a cigar box, he created a rustic violin and learned to play it (again, without his parents’ encouragement) by going to the barn where no one could hear him practice

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  1. “Samuel Jepperson, Early Pioneer Artist,” by D. Tobert Carter, Beehive History 24: Creators, Utah State Historical Society, 1998. []
  2. D. Tobert Carter. []

Heart’s Bounty, Chapter 2

By: Ardis E. Parshall - April 29, 2015

Heart’s Bounty

By Deone R. Sutherland

Previous chapter

Chapter 2

Synopsis: Fourteen-year-old Annie Griffith is taken by her father to Salt Lake City at the invitation of the Williams family to live and be educated with their daughter Marie. Annie’s family is temporarily living in the mountains while Brother Griffith serves a mission to cut stone for the temple. Annie, almost in tears, bids goodbye to her father, and is comforted by Parker Josephson, a neighbor and friend of the Williams family.

The days turned into a pattern for Annie Griffith, and she was able to get over the first pangs of homesickness that she had felt. She longed for word of her family, and letters did come whenever anyone from the camp came to the town. She applied herself to her lessons and grew quite proud of the ease with which she sailed through her first Latin grammar. She would be reading Julius Caesar in no time, Professor Peterson said. But her heart sank as the days got crisper, and it was obvious that her father wasn’t going to be able to make another trip down until spring. She hadn’t really expected him, but the thought that he might, had comforted her at night those first sad days.

Annie and Marie ran around the top of the carriage house spreading white sheets to dry fruit on. The apricots and corn were all long safe in the cellar, and the season for preparing for the winter, nearly over.

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“I Take Up My Pen”: Salt Lake & Ogden Railway Co., 1912

By: Ardis E. Parshall - April 29, 2015

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