Keepapitchinin, the Mormon History blog
 


Manti Temple, 1888

By: Ardis E. Parshall - January 26, 2015

.

.

Guest Post: Pickled Grapes

By: Amy Tanner Thiriot - January 26, 2015

Yes, you read that right. Pickled grapes.

.
FlikrGrapePickles
.

The Washington County Historical Society (WCHS) runs an email list notifying members of events and sending out questions from time to time. Over the weekend Victor Hall posed a question about the preserved grapes he remembered his mother, Hannah Crosby Hall, mentioning from her childhood. He noted:

…an earthen crock was filled with grapes over which either sorghum molasses or else vinegar was poured and was stored in the cool cellar. The grapes underwent a dramatic change in taste but adults enjoyed them as a treat and my mother might be sent for some when company came. She never developed a taste for them. Does someone know if it was sorghum molasses, or if was vinegar that was used as the preservative?

(more…)

In Our Ward: Lesson 4: “Prepare Ye the Way of the Lord”

By: Ardis E. Parshall - January 25, 2015

Lesson 4: “Prepare Ye the Way of the Lord”

Matthew 3-4
John 1
Mark 1
Luke 3

Purpose: To inspire class members to draw near to the Savior by repenting of their sins, keeping their baptismal covenants, and withstanding temptation.

Lesson Development

1. John the Baptist prepares the way of the Lord Jesus Christ.
2. Jesus is baptized by John the Baptist.
3. Jesus withstands Satan’s temptations in the wilderness.
4. Some of John the Baptist’s disciples decide to follow Jesus.
1. Insights from the Savior’s baptism
2. Jesus shows respect and love for his mother
3. Jesus shows reverence as he cleanses the temple

(more…)

Funny Bones, 1905

By: Ardis E. Parshall - January 24, 2015

These antique examples of the humor of our grandparents are new-to-Keepa today – they aren’t recycled from earlier posts. Hip, hip, hurray! (Or three groans, if they’re that bad.)

–oooOoooo–

Smith – “If a Filipino ate his father and mother, would would he be?” Brown guesses “Full,” then “Cannibal,” then gives up. Smith – “Ha! ha! old man, an orphan, of course.”

(more…)

The Striped Pencil

By: Ardis E. Parshall - January 23, 2015

Judith has to study it out in her own mind before the burden of guilt is lifted from her nine-year-old shoulders.

From the Relief Society Magazine, October 1941 –

The Striped Pencil

By Eva Willes Wangsgaard

“I’ll give it to you now, Celinda,” and Judith Rawson twirled a red, white, and blue pencil in her small fingers.

“But I don’t want it,” Celinda said, and she tossed her light brown ringlets in emphasis.

(more…)

The First Snow Vision

By: Ardis E. Parshall - January 23, 2015

In Rexburg, Idaho (from Jenna Galbraith Wood via Tom Kimball) —

.

.

Missionary Songs of Brigham Young, 1833

By: Ardis E. Parshall - January 23, 2015

If I ever write the biography that I think Brigham Young deserves, I will present Brigham the man – not merely Brigham the pioneer, Brigham the polygamist, Brigham the manager, Brigham the thunderer. I will present Brigham in the midst of his family, working and playing with his friends, and serving with those who knew him best. I will include the little details that have either not been noticed by prior biographers, or else were discounted as too trivial to take up space better filled by speculations on despotism and violence.

I would write about Brigham’s first real mission, in the winter of 1832-33, a year after he had been baptized. Brigham and his brother Joseph were assigned by Joseph Smith to travel to Canada. Joseph Young had earlier worked in Canada as a preacher of Methodism, and the Young brothers were assigned to work in the same area where Joseph Young had earlier preached, and, if possible to convert a man named Artemus Millet (they did – Millet was baptized in February 1833).

While I haven’t verified the weather report for early 1833, winter along Lake Ontario, where the Young brothers walked more than 500 miles, is normally a cold, snowy, windy, miserable place to be outdoors on foot. How did they keep up their spirits?

(more…)

A Prayer for Men at Conference Tables

By: Ardis E. Parshall - January 22, 2015

A Prayer for Men at Conference Tables

By Floyd T. Wood

God of all nations, great or small,
Let them not into error fall;
Cast out the things that make them blind:
The narrow soul, the narrow mind
That faith dishonors; will not see
The peace of right that ought to be.

What matters shade of outer skin
If souls are clean and white within?
Is strangeness, by its nature, wrong?
Is justice only for the strong?
So as they gather to repair
A frightened world, please, God, be there.

(1949)

Trailbuilders’ Caps, 1940

By: Ardis E. Parshall - January 22, 2015

The Trailbuilders (three oldest boys’ Primary classes) in the late ’30s and early ’40s wore beanies as well as bandlos as a uniform. Each year’s class symbol was added to the back of the cap as the boys moved from class to class.

.

(front)

.

(back)

.

Observant Mormons

By: Ardis E. Parshall - January 22, 2015

Some people are just more observant than I am.

The Improvement Era issue for January 1951 contained this two-page spread, a talk apostle John A. Widtsoe had given on a radio program. Billed as “A message for the New Year … a word of hope to a confused and fear-filled world,” the talk is illustrated by a picture of a farmer on some horse-drawn piece of equipment and the assurance that “the needs of men will be supplied by Mother Earth”; there is also an uncaptioned photo of a young man, in a suit coat and tie, his chiseled jaw the epitome of resolute courage. The page also features a couple of pull quotes: “Men who lay aside fear become the masters of the day,” and “History reveals that in every struggle evil has gradually been defeated and at length has been beaten down.”

.

.
(more…)

« Previous PageNext Page »