Keepapitchinin, the Mormon History blog
 


Drowning in a Sea of Marriage

By: Ardis E. Parshall - August 24, 2015

You know the legend of Daedalus and Icarus, right? Daedalus makes a set of wings for his son Icarus, out of feathers and wax. Icarus disobeys his father’s caution, flies too near the sun, his wax wings melt, and he falls to earth. Here’s an unusual depiction of that legend, from the 16th century Flemish painter Pieter Bruegel the Elder1:

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If you don’t know this painting already, you might have to hunt for it. You see that pair of legs kicking in the water, toward the bottom right corner of the painting? That’s Icarus, after he’s fallen. The joke, of course, is that everybody else – a fisherman, a shepherd, a plowman, anybody on the nearby ship – is so intent on their own day-to-day affairs that they don’t even notice the extraordinary being in their midst.

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  1. Or, as is now believed, probably an early copy by an unknown artist of a lost Bruegel original []

In Our Ward: Lesson 31: “And So Were the Churches Established in the Faith”

By: Ardis E. Parshall - August 23, 2015

Lesson 31: “And So Were the Churches Established in the Faith”

Acts 15-18
1-2 Thessalonians
1 Corinthians 2

Purpose: To help class members learn from Paul’s teachings about how to share the gospel and how to live as Saints.

Lesson Development

1. Paul, Silas, and Timothy preach throughout Macedonia and Greece.
2. Paul preaches on Mars’ Hill to the Athenian philosophers.
3. Paul writes letters of counsel to the Saints in Thessalonica.

SCRIPTURE DISCUSSION AND APPLICATION

Attention activity

[Sketch illustrative diagram on board during activity: say, two circles to represent Judaism and Christianity, coloring in “lunatic fringe” at appropriate time, a connecting arch at the top to represent shared origins, etc. Write “21st century” somewhere, to be altered to “1st century”.]

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Sister Missionary: 10 May – 16 May 1947

By: Ardis E. Parshall - August 23, 2015

(Previous installment)

May 10, 1947

We had a Missionary Report Meeting today. It started at one and lasted until 5:15. It was a good meeting – my chair got a little hard, tho. There is a swell group of missionaries in this district, and we have a wonderful man for District President – his wife is the same. We are going to see if we can’t put out more Books of Mormon and will challenge the district that put the most books out last month to see if we can’t put out more during the month of June.

After the meeting Sister Hawkes served us chili, sure was good. Elders Hadfield and Burton came just as we finished eating – we had looked for them to come to the meeting but they couldn’t make it. Elder Burton brought his colored slides and that evening showed them to all of us who were still there. They are staying in our room at Bennyhof’s and we are over to Virginia Allen’s. She is in Petaluma tonight. We have never been here before and tried three rooms before we got the right one. In the second one we had laid down our things and I was starting to get ready for bed when Sister Winters opened the closet door to hang her dress up and noticed that none of the clothes in there looked like Virgin[i]a’s. But we’re in the right room now.

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Saturday Remix, 1946 (2)

By: Ardis E. Parshall - August 22, 2015

Last Degree

“What did you take at college?”

“A course in husbandry.”

“Then why did they give you a bachelor’s degree?”

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An Apple for the Teacher

By: Ardis E. Parshall - August 21, 2015

From the Relief Society Magazine, September 1950 –

An Apple for the Teacher

By Lydia Bennett Egbert

Mrs. Bently had just finished her breakfast dishes. She dried her hands and drew aside the crisp ruffled curtain from the window to watch the school children surging by, and yearned a little when she recalled the years when her own had been among the happy throng on that always excitable first day of school.

Gradually, the sound of clattering feet and merry laughter faded away, and Mrs. Bently might have turned from the window had her eye not caught sight of her thriving young apple tree standing bright and green against the white picket fence. Only in its fourth year, it was already beginning to bear, and the dozen apples that she had watched with anticipation all through the summer months now hung ripe and red.

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Juvenile Instructor, 1 May 1904

By: Ardis E. Parshall - August 21, 2015

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John Charles Hailes: A Steady Testimony

By: Ardis E. Parshall - August 21, 2015

John Charles Hailes, born in Reading, England, in 1881, wrote a letter to the Latter-day Saints of Great Britain in the fall of 1908, about his conversion to the Church:

My Dear Brethren and Sisters,

I am serving on board the first-class battleship Vengeance, Home squadron. I feel desirous of bearing my testimony with regard to the truth of Mormonism, and relating how I found the truth.

From my childhood I always had a desire to serve my Creator, but my mind was always confused. I used to think when a child that every country had its own religion: England, Church of England; Ireland, Roman Catholicism; Scotland, Presbyterianism; and so on. Of course, as I grew older I learned that my idea was absurd.

I was drafted to China in 1903 on a foreign commission. During my stay out there I associated a good deal with some of my shipmates who were of the Wesleyan faith. Although I could not see much in their belief to admire, it brought me nearer to God. On one occasion a chum and I knelt down and asked God to forgive us our sins, and we would try to live a better life. Although I had never been addicted to drinking or smoking, my conscience told me I was not obeying the commands of my Heavenly father as fully as I should. I became very desirous of being right with God. I visited the Church of England Cathedral in Hong Kong, but I was not satisfied with what I saw and heard there.

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A Dream Come True

By: Ardis E. Parshall - August 20, 2015

A Dream Come True

By Uva May Carter

Some of my dreams, I know, will ne’er come true,
But come what will, I’ll still have this to say:
That I have sat in that historic place,
Head bowed, and heard that mighty organ play:

Soft melody that tells a tale of dreams,
Triumphant strains proclaiming dreams fulfilled,
Deep, throbbing notes that speak of wondrous faith
To work and strive and do all God has willed.

I closed my eyes, and I could almost see
Those Pioneers who built that sacred place,
Whose faith and toil and sacrifice have reared
A monument that time will ne’er efface.

I wonder if that organ tells to all
The story of those faithful Pioneers,
Their faith and trust, the heritage they left
To which we must be true in coming years.

(1942)

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Paper Doll, 1960

By: Ardis E. Parshall - August 20, 2015

From the Children’s Friend, December 1960 —

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A Compilation of Keepa Stories

By: Ardis E. Parshall - August 20, 2015

This is a compilation of Keepa posts – not doctrine, not culture, not biography, but of events with a beginning, middle, and end. It’s mostly for newish Keepa readers who haven’t yet explored the archives (the “Topical Guide” button in the top lefthand corner of this page) – or for oldtimers who might enjoy them again. Many of them seem to involve disasters of one kind or another – those are the natural settings for drama, I suppose. But there’s some comedy, too.

Before Our Journey’s Through

After the group completed their last temple session in Mesa, everyone climbed aboard their bus for the overnight trip home. Amasa Steed, despite his youth, was an experienced and careful driver. The rain made it hard to see far in the darkness, but he knew the route, including the detour he would have to take. Steed watched for the torches that workmen routinely left burning as safety beacons near the large DETOUR signs blocking the highway and marking the detour. Finally he spotted flickering lights despite the rain on his windshield There was the detour, he told himself.

The Champion Checkers Player of Salt Lake City

When Brigham Young III (1857-1945, called “Bid”) was in his early teens, he ran with a small crowd of neighbor boys who won the privilege from Bid’s grandfather, the Brigham Young, to use his offices, housed in the building between Brigham’s Lion and Beehive family homes, as a sort of clubhouse. The boys met there in the winter in a proto-Mutual Improvement association, to read the books and newspapers housed there and to engage in formal conversation. Or at least that was the intended program. Usually, though, after poking a bit through whatever reading material was handy, the boys pulled out the checkerboard and played games. It didn’t take long before one of them emerged as the club’s champion checkers player.

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