Keepapitchinin, the Mormon History blog
 


Hungry Sheep

By: Ardis E. Parshall - March 30, 2015

From the Improvement Era, April 1946 –

Hungry Sheep

By Blanche Kendall McKay

It was not by accident that Joan watched the large Goodrich sedan draw up to the curb across the street. She had brought her work from the Daily Gazette to her bedroom so as to be at home when the three o’clock train pulled in from Henderson. In a moment the chauffeur alighted and helped Henrietta Goodrich and her sister Elizabeth to the sidewalk. Elizabeth was the elder by some ten years, but it was she who carried the overnight bag, while Henrietta leaned upon the chauffeur’s arm. They have failed, thought Joan, the war is over, but Paul refused to come home. Lannie, the colored maid, appeared on the porch, took the bag and assisted Henrietta into the house. The chauffeur drove away, and the large Goodrich house settled to its customary atmosphere of silent immobility.

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“I Take Up My Pen”: Andrew Jenson History Company, 1905

By: Ardis E. Parshall - March 30, 2015

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In Our Ward: Lesson 11: “He Spake Many Things unto Them in Parables”

By: Ardis E. Parshall - March 29, 2015

Lesson 11: “He Spake Many Things unto Them in Parables”

Matthew 13

Purpose: To help class members develop “ears to hear” so they can understand how Jesus’ parables apply to them.

Lesson Development

1. Jesus presents the parable of the sower and explains his use of parables
2. Jesus explains the parable of the sower
3. Jesus uses parables to teach about the kingdom of heaven on earth

Scripture Discussion and Application

In the Old Testament account of King David, we read that David lusted after Bathsheba, then had her husband Uriah sent to a place in battle where he knew Uriah would be killed. Then David married Bathsheba. “The thing that David had done displeased the Lord,” (2 Samuel 11:27) Let’s read what happened next:

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“Cast Thy Burden”

By: Ardis E. Parshall - March 27, 2015

From the Relief Society Magazine, February 1947 –

“Cast Thy Burden”

By Rhea Reeder Smith

This spring seemed different to Ann. She often wondered why. Probably because growing to an adult brought responsibilities that, at times, she heartily disliked. Ann thought bitterly, I never thought life would be like this. I always thought that dreams came true. There’s so much I expected and didn’t get. It seems as if I never will.

This particular thought sent a fresh wave of resentment through her, and she began the day very badly. The eternal struggle with bills wearied her. There were so many demands, and never enough money to provide for all the things they really needed, let alone a little to save, or even enough, just once, to enjoy a foolish little luxury. It had been a long time since she and Doug had left the children to go out together.

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Young Woman’s Journal, 1926

By: Ardis E. Parshall - March 27, 2015

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The House of the Lord, 1968

By: Ardis E. Parshall - March 27, 2015

If you (your parents, your grandparents) have a late-1960s edition of  The House of the Lord on your bookshelf, this might be why:

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints
Office of the First Presidency
Salt Lake City 11, Utah

July 10, 1968

TO STAKE AND MISSION PRESIDENTS, BISHOPS AND BRANCH PRESIDENTS

Dear Brethren:

With substantial increases occurring in Church membership and activity there are growing numbers of our brethren and sisters who are coming to the temples.

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Seek Ye the Lord

By: Ardis E. Parshall - March 26, 2015

Seek Ye The Lord

By Maria Berry

When upon life’s heaving billows
You are tossed from side to side,
Broken-hearted and forsaken
You are drifting with the tide;
Hope no longer is your anchor,
You’ve forgotten how to pray,
You have lost your hold on Jesus,
And, without Him, missed your way.

Raise your voice once more to Heaven,
Ask the Lord to be your guide;
You will find the safest harbor
By His kind and loving side;
He will heal your broken spirit,
Fit you for the storms of life;
Resting all your cares on Jesus
You will never fear the strife.

We could never fight life’s battles,
If we did not seek His aid;
He will bear the weary burdens
That have heavy on us laid;
He will guide our faltering footsteps,
Walking with us hand in hand;
Cheering, helping, He will lead us
Safe into the promised land.

(1913)

“I Take Up My Pen”: Lester Park & Bro., 1912

By: Ardis E. Parshall - March 26, 2015

This is the company that made the, um, incomparable (yeah, that’s the word we’ll use) movie Corianton: An Unholy Love in 1931. In 1916, they were the official motion picture photographers of the Beehive Girls. And in 1912, they used this letterhead.  It’s printed a pale lime green:

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And here I’ve darkened it, unfortunately completely changing the color, so that you can read it it:

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A Few [Gentile Recorded] Minutes in London, September 1857

By: Ardis E. Parshall - March 26, 2015

This post, rather than being transcribed from minute books kept by Latter-day Saints, is taken from a journalist’s account of the meeting published in the British press – the paper I’m typing from is the North Wales Chronicle of Bangor, Wales, 12 September 1857. To judge by the more neutral tone of the account of the meeting, and the mocking tone of the account of the social, two different reporters are represented here.

Mormon Conference in London

This sect held its sixth annual conference on Sunday, at the Adelaide Gallery, Lowther Arcade, Strand. It was presided over by “two of the apostles,” Brothers Orson Pratt and Ezra Benson. About 600 persons were present in the morning, about 1,000 in the afternoon, and upwards of 1,000 in the evening, most of whom, judging from appearances, were Latter-day Saints, or Mormons. The proceedings consisted chiefly of addresses.

Delegates were present from different parts of the country.

Brother Pratt described in forcible language the scriptural claims of Mormonism.

From the statement of Pastor Ross, the representative of London, it appeared that £1,200 had been subscribed during the past year for emigration and other purposes. The exertions of the priesthood in the good work had been universally received and accepted. Preaching in the streets, lanes, and other places had been revived, and where there had been opposition great wisdom had been evinced.

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Spring Dress

By: Ardis E. Parshall - March 25, 2015

From the Improvement Era, March 1948 –

Spring Dress

By Mark Hager

Every March for the past twenty years, Amy or Ethel or Mae brings a little package and hands it to Mother. She kisses it, even before she opens it, for she knows what it is, and she cries.

I know, too, for I also remember that other March. I know what the girls are remembering when they buy it. I know they are remembering the late March evening when the old Syrian peddler fumbled with his cold hands at the straps of the big leather grip he’d thrown onto the edge of our front porch, and I recall how Mother and the girls stood impatient and shivering, waiting for him to get the thing open.

He glanced around at the three girls. Amy was fourteen, Ethel twelve, and Mae ten, that spring, and the old Syrian with the long gray mustache, fished out of the black leather case a flaming bolt of checkered calico and handed it to Mother.

She took it and kissed it and then held it to her cheek and started to cry. Bright things in the spring could always make Mother cry. We never did ask her why, because we knew she’d only say, “Just because,” as if we couldn’t understand.

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