Keepapitchinin, the Mormon History blog
 


Joseph Smith Papers: Publication of the Printer’s Manuscript of the Book of Mormon

By: Ardis E. Parshall - August 04, 2015

If we lay aside the cloak of inevitability that often shrouds believers’ view of early Church history, and imagine what must have been Joseph Smith’s day-to-day experience of translating and publishing the Book of Mormon, we find drama at every turn: An angel tells Joseph of the existence of the record. Neighbors waylay Joseph on the road, and invade his parents’ home, looking for gold. Courtship, marriage, and family tragedy are bound in with the translation. Friends are raised to assist him both in scribal duties and in temporal support. Friends betray him, the Lord chastises him, copyright infringers cheat him, neighbors threaten him.

Is there any need to wonder at the precautions Joseph took to protect the record, both in its original metallic form and in its translated paper form?

One of those precautions, taken in the summer of 1829 while the book was in process of being printed at the Grandin print shop in Palmyra, was to have Oliver Cowdery (with assistance) make a copy of the original manuscript, so that Joseph never had to leave his only copy of the Book of Mormon, or any part of it, with the printer, unguarded by Joseph or others he could trust.

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For the Bereft

By: Ardis E. Parshall - August 04, 2015

For the Bereft

by Christie Lund Coles

These words are for those who have lost their love,
Who must walk bereft the whole world wide
With only their courage for sustenance —
And their pride.

(1948)

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The Children’s Friend, August 1927

By: Ardis E. Parshall - August 04, 2015

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The Liberal Mormon: The State as an Agent for Justice

By: Ardis E. Parshall - August 04, 2015

This was an adult Sunday School lesson in 1928; other lessons from that course appear in the Topical Guide under “The Liberal Mormon” heading.

November 18, 1928

The State as an Agent for Justice

“Government is a trust, and the officers of the government are trustees; and both the trust and the trustees are created for the benefit of the people.” – Henry Clay.

Basal Readings

Let every soul be subject unto the higher powers. For there is no power but of God: the powers that be are ordained of God. Whosoever therefore resisteth the power, resisteth the ordinance of God: and they that resist shall receive to themselves damnation. For rulers are not a terror to good works, but to the evil. Wilt thou then not be afraid of the power? do that which is good, and thou shalt have praise of the same: for he is the minister of God to thee for good. but if thou do that which is evil, be afraid; for he beareth not the sword in vain: for he is the minister of God, a revenger to execute wrath upon him that doeth evil. wherefore ye must needs be subject, not only for wrath, but also for conscience sake. For for this cause pay ye tribute also: for they are God’s ministers, attending continually upon this very thing. Render therefore to all their dues: tribute to whom tribute is due; custom to whom custom; fear to whom fear; honour to whom honour. – Romans 13:1-7

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The Secret of Blueberry Hill: Chapter 1 (of 5)

By: Ardis E. Parshall - August 03, 2015

From the Relief Society Magazine, 1970 –

The Secret of Blueberry Hill

By Rosa Lee Lloyd

Chapter 1

Johnny McIntyre was the first to arrive in Skylark, Kansas, after Lila sent the telegrams informing them that their beloved Aunt Lucinda had died quietly in her sleep.

Lila stood near the window of the old white frame house on Clover Street watching him park his bright red car in the driveway. She realized he must have driven like the wind to get here from Kansas City in three hours.

He bounded up the graveled pathway toward the front porch.

Don’t hurry now, Johnny, Lila thought with a little sigh coming up from her aching heart. Aunt Lucinda isn’t here anymore to greet you with open arms and a wide, tender smile. She isn’t here to watch the mailbox for your letters or to wait until long after her bedtime every night hoping you or Steven or Elizabeth will call her. Her love for all of us was so wonderful! And her death was so unexpected.

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“I Take Up My Pen”: Deseret Book Company, 1934

By: Ardis E. Parshall - August 03, 2015

The “NRA” symbol refers to the National Recovery Administration, one of Franklin D. Roosevelt’s New Deal programs to aid in the U.S. recovery from the Depression. The symbol specifically indicates that Deseret Book met national criteria for fair commercial practices. A year earlier, the Relief Society had endorsed the goals of the NRA with regard to the making of clothing.

The caveat I added to that earlier post applies here as well: Remember: Comments arguing against the point of view expressed in this document from the Mormon past must address Mormonism. Commentary debating FDR’s policies or arguing political or economic ideologies without considering the existence of this strain of thought within Mormonism is not solicited. (Regular commenters at Keepa have far more leeway in this regard than once-in-a-while or first-time commenters.)

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“An Elder Goes into a New Town …”

By: Ardis E. Parshall - August 03, 2015

I served in the Switzerland Geneva Mission {mumblety-mumblety multiple decades} ago, which took in the French-speaking corner of Switzerland and maybe a third of France. Geographically, culturally, historically, linguistically, France was the ideal place for me. I had begun teaching myself the language as a sixth grader, memorizing words from a dictionary, and I took as much French in high school as was offered – even after a three-year gap between high school and college, I tested well enough in French to start in upper-division literature classes as a first semester freshman. I read – and chattered – so much about French history and culture that at one point my parents banned me from mentioning France at the dinner table.

When I finally got to the mission, I wanted to spend every P[reparation]-day visiting museums and monasteries and libraries – with one exception (a visit to the Chateau d’If in the Mediterranean off Marseille, which was the setting for much of “The Count of Monte Cristo”), that kind tourism was something I was able to do only after I became a senior companion (none of my seniors were the slightest bit interested), and even then very, very rarely because of the aversion of companions to that sort of thing. I left both Marseille and Lyons without having been anywhere near the great cathedrals that both cities are known for. Despite having served twice in Marseille, I have no souvenirs from that city, no cultural knowledge beyond its obvious roots as a seaport. Lyons? Even less. There was a silk industry there for hundreds of years, but beyond that? I know more about Lyons now from picking up pieces of Mormon history (we had a Lyonnaise sister in World War I who served at the front with the Red Cross!) than I knew as a missionary.

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In Our Ward: Lesson 28: “We Are Witnesses”

By: Ardis E. Parshall - August 02, 2015

Lesson 28: “We Are Witnesses”

Acts 1-5

Purpose: To remind class members of their responsibility to be witnesses of Jesus Christ and to help them see how the gift of the Holy Ghost helps them do so.

Lesson Development

1. The Lord ascends into heaven. Matthias is called to be an Apostle.
2. On the day of Pentecost, the Apostles are filled with the Holy Ghost.
3. Peter and John heal a lame man by the power of Jesus Christ.
4. The Apostles continue to preach and heal with great power.

1. Manifestation of the Holy Ghost at the Kirtland Temple dedication.
2. “The times of restitution of all things”
3. “They had all things in common”

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Sister Missionary: 3 February – 25 February 1947

By: Ardis E. Parshall - August 02, 2015

(Previous installment)

Feb 3, 1947

It has been such a long time since I wrote in my book that I will make a brief review of what has happened. The cottage meeting was held in Lake County at the home of Frank and Vi Robinson in Sulfur Banks Mines. After the meeting Vi served refreshments and asked Sister Durtschi and I to come and spend Christmas with them. We planned to do it, but as things worked out we didn’t go until about a month ago. The cottage meeting in Lake Co. last month was held at Bro. Jordan’s mother’s home and we went home with Frank and Vi and stayed until Saturday night. it is very beautiful where they live. It’s at the edge of a lake up in the mountains. The water is so blue in the day time, but at night, or just after the sun goes down it turns silvery white. It seems so strange. We had a turkey dinner Friday. It was sure a big one. Vi told us when it was all gone we’d have to go home. They’re such a cute couple. We played records practically all day – Sis tried to teach me to jitterbug and I did better than I thought I could. Vi is a member but Frank isn’t. Both of them smoke but are very sincere and interested in learning more of the gospel – Vi has been away from home since she was quite young and she really surprised me – I didn’t think she was so religious. Friday night they gave us all the cigarettes in the house and we took them out in back, it was on a hill – to burn them. But the things wouldn’t burn. We had the hardest time with them. Finally I covered them up with dirt. They came to the window to watch usw and laugh at us.

Saturday morning we went tracting up there. It was beautiful fall weather – brisk and clear. The people up there have a wonderful view of the lake from the front doors – they all face the lake and have their backs to the road. They were very friendly to us but none were interested in hearing about the gospel. Friday night they took us to a show in Lakeport and Saturday night to one in Ukiah. Mary and Earl Tovie went Saturday night, too. Mary and Vi are sisters, both married non-members. But their husbands are so good. Oh, I hope they do join and that Vi and Mary will be more serious about it.

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Saturday Remix, 1909 (2)

By: Ardis E. Parshall - August 01, 2015

Agreeable to Him

The chief officer of a United States Army recruiting station sat sunning himself in his chair, when a husky, country-appearing youth strolled into the quarters and stood gazing in admiration at the glittering sabers, belts and muskets which adorned the room.

“Well, sir?” spoke up the officer.

“I’d like to join the Army, sir,” said the young man, turning toward the speaker.

“Think you’d like army life, my boy?” queried the officer, in a fatherly tone, after a favorable glance over the youthful aspirant’s figure.

“I guess so. How much do you pay in the army?”

“Well, a private gets on an average $14 a month; a lieutenant $100, a captain $200, and so on!”

“I’ll join,” decided the applicant, throwing his cap on the officer’s desk. “Put me down for a captain!”

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