Keepapitchinin, the Mormon History blog » Prehistoric Oregon Trail
 


Prehistoric Oregon Trail

By: Ardis E. Parshall - April 04, 2014

From 1948 –

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6 Comments »

  1. I found an old copy of the Federal Reserve Bulletin from 1949 that reported median household income for 1948, based on surveys conducted by the Federal Reserve, to be $3,120.

    So, that game (boring as it sounds–“Boy, they really TEACH!” sounds just like what every kid wants under his Christmas tree) would have cost about .1% of the household income.

    Based on 2013 figures for median income, would you spend $50 for that game? I didn’t think so.

    Comment by Mark B. — April 4, 2014 @ 11:49 am

  2. 1948? Part of a centennial boom of trek nostalgia, I suppose.

    Comment by John Mansfield — April 4, 2014 @ 11:58 am

  3. Why is it that old letters always identify the writer, as if the recipient doesn’t know them? “your Boy and Girl”? “Your Son, Tom”? The game itself looks interesting, but certainly not worth the price!

    Comment by deb — April 4, 2014 @ 1:17 pm

  4. I’d love to see an actual photo of the game board so I can “look, as the move the miniature Covered Wagon across the board”

    Comment by Iguacufalls — April 4, 2014 @ 1:44 pm

  5. It sure is fun to find typos even in the days where they had to set the type by hand…

    Comment by Iguacufalls — April 4, 2014 @ 1:45 pm

  6. We had this game at home in Los Angeles in the 50’s. A look at the complexities of the board (which can be seen at (http://www.worthpoint.com/worthopedia/game-emigration-1947-mormon-lds-board-75031477)discouraged me from trying the game until in fifth or sixth grade, when I brought it our to try with a couple of Jewish friends. I still remember the look of guarded disbelief as I explained the game’s context to them.

    However the game did feature intriguing drawings of buffalo skulls.

    I’ll have to ask my parents if they ever played the game with their friends.

    Comment by Stephen Taylor — April 4, 2014 @ 5:39 pm

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