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“I Take Up My Pen”: Lamanite Genealogical Society, 1921

By: Ardis E. Parshall - April 03, 2014

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3 Comments »

  1. “In October 1919 the church organized the Lamanite Society to encourage genealogical activity among native Americans, and by March 1924 reports indicated that more than 12,000 Indian names had been collected for vicarious ordinance work.”

    Alexander, Thomas G. Mormonism in Transition: A History of the Latter-Day Saints, 1890-1930, 298.

    [Thank you, Google Books!]

    Comment by David Y. — April 3, 2014 @ 10:57 am

  2. [Thanks you, David.]

    One of the ways they encouraged the work, I can tell by reading the files, is to collect records of what temple work had been done previously; another was to teach how to create and preserve written records. One of the interesting questions, of course, is defining “Lamanite.” This society defined it as broadly as I’ve ever seen it — Native American, Mexican, Pacific Islander as far away as New Zealand.

    Comment by Ardis E. Parshall — April 3, 2014 @ 1:44 pm

  3. “[A]nother [way the Society encouraged genealogical activity] was to teach how to create and preserve written records.”

    I loved reading that. As has been repeated so often, family history is more than just extraction and proxy ordinance work. Creating and preserving written records (family histories?) seems especially important for marginalized peoples such as the American Indians.

    Comment by David Y. — April 3, 2014 @ 2:17 pm

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