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Blow Gently, Ye Wild Winds

By: Ardis E. Parshall - October 29, 2013

Blow Gently, Ye Wild Winds

By Charles W. Penrose

Blow gently, ye wild winds with frost in your breath,
That smite the glad stream with the chill hand of death,
When shrieking and fierce o’er the mountains ye come,
Blow gently, I pray, on my loved ones at home!

Thou ice-crowned King Winter, with storms at thy side,
Thou white-breasted Snow drift, the storm monarch’s bride,
While binding the sunshine and chilling the air,
Be gentle in Utah, my loved ones are there!

Fell Demon of Pain, with merciless eye,
Look not on my dwelling, pass hastily by;
Thou wrinkled-browed Want, keep away from my door,
That thy shadow may fall on my loved ones no more.

Go, rosy-faced Laughter, on pinions of light,
Take health, thy companion, to share in thy flight,
Diffuse through my rude cot a life-giving bloom,
And dimple the cheeks of my loved ones at home.

Bright angel of gladness, so calm, yet so strong,
Sweet spirit of Hope, as thou glidest along
On thy mission of peace to the souls who are tried,
O, rest for a while where my loved ones reside!

Bid Fear, Doubt and Sadness forever depart,
And dry up the tear-drop that Memory may start.
Then point to the time when the wand’rer shall come,
And press to his fond heart his loved ones at home!

(1861)



4 Comments »

  1. Amen.

    Comment by Adam G. — October 29, 2013 @ 3:49 pm

  2. I assume this is early into his second mission to England? (Can the date of composition be narrowed sufficiently?)

    Comment by Edje Jeter — October 29, 2013 @ 4:02 pm

  3. The personification of hope, pain, laughter, gladness, etc. reminds me of the currency of the era. “Liberty” was popular on coinage, but paper money often included women representing Industry, Knowledge, Thrift, Temperance, Justice, etc.

    Comment by The Other Clark — October 29, 2013 @ 4:04 pm

  4. Edje, I only know the date of publication. Kent Larsen is the poetry guru who might know, though — I’ll ask him.

    Comment by Ardis E. Parshall — October 29, 2013 @ 4:56 pm

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