Keepapitchinin, the Mormon History blog » Guest Post: A Few Minutes in Novo Hamburgo, Brazil, 1942
 


Guest Post: A Few Minutes in Novo Hamburgo, Brazil, 1942

By: Kent Larsen - September 20, 2013

Kent Larsen has transcribed these Portuguese minutes, and provided an English translation here — but before you go there, perhaps you would enjoy puzzling out the minutes yourself from your knowledge of how LDS meetings work as well as whatever foreign language skills you have.

Reunião Sacramental, 6 de Setembro de 1942

Dirigido por Elder Werrett
Primeiro Canção No. 17 Deus é Sabedor
Invocação Elder Warren E. Porter
Segundo Canção No. 9 Careça de Jesus
Sacramento Irmão Autan Behrens
Testemunhos
Ultimo Canção No. 10 Pensaste Orar
Oração Elder Werrett

Preceu: Membros 10, Amigos 1, Missionar. 2, Total: 13

Reunião Sacramental, 13 de Setembro de 1942

Dirigido por Elder Peterson
Primeiro Canção No. 6 Mestre o Mar se …
Oração Elder Harman
Sacramento: Irmão Behrens
Segundo Canção No. 11 Communhão Celeste
Primeiro Pregação Elder Harman
Segundo [Pregação] Elder Peterson
Ultimo Canção No. 24 Amor no lar
Oração Elder Peterson

Preceu: Membros 8, Amigos 2, Missionar. 2, Total: 12

Reunião Sacramental, 20 de Setembro de 1942

Dirigido por Elder Forsyth
Primeiro Canção No. 24 Amor no Lar
Oração Elder Zollinger
Segundo Canção No. 18 Conto as Benções
Sacramento: Irmão Autan Behrens
Primeiro Pregação Elder Zollinger
Segundo [Pregação] Elder Forsyth
Ultimo Canção No. 14 Hino de partir
Oração Irmã Berta Deiber

Preceu: Membros 10, Amigos 2, Missionar. 2, Total: 14

Reunião Sacramental, 27 de Setembro de 1942

Dirigido por Elder Forsyth
Primeiro Canção No. 28 Regosijemo-nos
Oração Elder Forsyth
Segundo Canção No. 34 Semeando
Verso Sacramental: 3 Nephi 13:1-6
Sacramento: Irmão Autan Behrens e Irmão Egan Herrimann
Pregador Elder Forsyth
Ultima Canção No. 22 Eterno Sol
Oração Brother Alfredo Koch

Preceu: Membros 10, Amigos 1, Missionar. 1, Total: 12



13 Comments »

  1. This is fun. I think hymn #10 is Ere You Left Your Room this Morning.

    And, #11 is There is an Hour of Peace and Rest, or Secret Prayer.

    Maybe #14 is Sing We Now at Parting?

    Comment by Carol — September 20, 2013 @ 6:47 am

  2. #28 is “Now Let Us Rejoice.”

    Interesting that they included a “sacrament verse” prior to the sacrament in one of the programs. I’ve heard of such traditions in Wasatch wards, but never been in one myself. What exactly is the practice? Was it done every week?

    Comment by Dave K — September 20, 2013 @ 7:12 am

  3. Dave, I’m guessing the “sacrament verse” was what we used to call a Sacrament Gem. That was usually associated with Sunday School, but perhaps it carried over into the main meeting occasionally.

    Comment by Ardis E. Parshall — September 20, 2013 @ 7:34 am

  4. Thanks Ardis. I was under the impression that some wards had a practice of reciting a scripture just before the sacrament – a practice that was official cut off in the 2010 CHI. I’d not heard of the Sacrament Gems at all. Very interesting.

    Comment by Dave K — September 20, 2013 @ 8:18 am

  5. what we used to call a Sacrament Gem.

    My first Church memories are from when I was 5, just back from two years in Europe where we had not attended. I spent the first year or so wondering what the connection was between the sacrament, a truncated scripture, and gym.

    Comment by Last Lemming — September 20, 2013 @ 8:26 am

  6. SERVI EM NOVO HAMBURGO!!

    Não li a tradução, mas . . . oops. I didn’t read the translation but there are a few typos or grammatical errors in the Portuguese. Like “Conto as Benções” should be “Conta as Bênçãos.” They almost got it. Maybe it was just a bad, initial translation of one of my favorites in Portuguese “When Upon Life’s Billows” or “Count Your Blessings” most famously for its chorus at the high point. Instead of “Count your blessings, name them one by one,” in Portuguese you hit that with “UMA A UMA!” sounding something like “OOOHMA OOOHMA!” Great fun!

    I did notice that the only members listed all had German names. All German-Brazilians were required to speak Portuguese in public meetings once the war broke out. Brazil (unlike “neutral” Argentina until right at the end when the Allied Victory was obvious) was an active participant and sent the Brazilian Expeditionary Force to Italy.

    The German-Brazilians were very proud of their patriotism. Our ward mission leader in Novo Hamburgo, Irmão Schirmer, had served in the FEB (BEF) and claimed to have a picture of Mussolini hanging in death (which I refused to look at).

    Comment by Grant — September 20, 2013 @ 9:18 am

  7. I could go on and on which I guess I am, but Novo Hamburgo is a beautiful, green place surrounded by hills – not quite as dramatic as the Austrian Alps but there were times in Novo Hamburgo when my mind would wander and I felt like I was one of the Von Trapp children.

    Comment by Grant — September 20, 2013 @ 9:24 am

  8. You mentioned recently, Grant, that you had served in Novo Hamburgo. Knowing this post was in the works, I bit my tongue in order to preserve the surprise.

    Comment by Ardis E. Parshall — September 20, 2013 @ 9:29 am

  9. :)

    Comment by Grant — September 20, 2013 @ 9:36 am

  10. Also interesting is that, though only one or two missionaries are ever listed in attendance at any given meeting, the names change from week to week. I would have expected a little more stability.

    Comment by Matt — September 20, 2013 @ 11:26 am

  11. I also like the use of “friends” as opposed to “investigadores” or “pesquisadores.”

    Comment by Matt — September 20, 2013 @ 11:31 am

  12. 10 members, yet every sermon for the entire month is the elders.

    Comment by The Other Clark — September 20, 2013 @ 1:46 pm

  13. Grant writes: “I didn’t read the translation but there are a few typos or grammatical errors in the Portuguese.”

    Yes, I transcribed what the handwriting appeared to say. Either the tail on the letter “a” was invisible in the images, or the word “Conto” was spelled incorrectly.

    I suspect the latter, both because education levels in Brazil weren’t as high as they are now, and because the members of this branch were likely all German-speaking natives and likely not very strong in their Portuguese. Its also possible that whoever kept the minutes was a missionary from the U.S. — who could also have made errors.

    It isn’t widely know that until just 3 years or so before these minutes were taken, the mission language in Brazil was German. Then in the late 1930s the Brazilian government prohibited meetings in any language but Portuguese, and by 1939 the government’s increasing crackdown led the Church to stop all its meetings in German. The change was wrenching for the couple thousand members in Brazil at the time, and it seems clear that many members went inactive as a result, either because they saw the Church as a “German” institution, or because they simply couldn’t understand what was going on any more.

    I wouldn’t be surprised if whoever kept these minutes simply didn’t know how words were correctly spelled.

    Comment by Kent Larsen — September 20, 2013 @ 7:49 pm

Leave a comment

RSS feed for comments on this post.
TrackBack URI