Keepapitchinin, the Mormon History blog » Pouze jedenkráte v životě: naskýtá se Vam přiležitost účastniti se jubilejních oslav 100. výroči trvǎní
 


Pouze jedenkráte v životě: naskýtá se Vam přiležitost účastniti se jubilejních oslav 100. výroči trvǎní

By: Ardis E. Parshall - April 29, 2013

If you had been a resident of Prague in 1930, you might have met a Mormon elder on the street who handed you this leaflet, inviting you to a public presentation on “100 Years of Mormonism.” Would you have come?

(The phrase Církve Ježiše Krista sv. p. dnů is the name of the Church. One of the two short phrases in the bottom right corner no doubt is the Czech equivalent of “no collection taken.” Otherwise, you’re on your own.)

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5 Comments »

  1. Well, according to Google Translate, the boxed text says:

    100 Years of Mormonism – American missionaries will illustrate lectures and songs in the native language of passion superbly results of the activities of this organization, the oak and its duration.

    Somewhat helpful, but the limitations are obvious. The native language of passion? The oak and its duration?

    Comment by kevinf — April 29, 2013 @ 11:13 am

  2. Hmmm. Sounds like Google Translate might be the green missionary in France who preaches about “l’amour physique” instead of “la mort physique” … that could be the “native language of passion” of which you speak …

    Comment by Ardis E. Parshall — April 29, 2013 @ 11:26 am

  3. My brother was one of the first missionaries sent in after the Velvet Revolution. In a few instances they were met by members who had remained faithful over the Cold War.

    Comment by J. Stapley — April 29, 2013 @ 11:46 am

  4. That should make for some puzzled French investigators–what’s all this talk about salvation from “l’amour physique”?

    But this handbill does remind me how lost I felt when I crossed from Austria into the Czech Republic. The German “April” makes a lot more sense than the Czech “dubna.” Even the Japanese “1930年 4月 6日” is easier to figure out.

    Comment by Mark B. — April 29, 2013 @ 11:48 am

  5. Except that in 1930 they would have written 昭和五年四月六日.

    :)

    Comment by lindberg — May 1, 2013 @ 5:36 pm

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