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Happy Birthday, George Albert Smith

By: Ardis E. Parshall - April 04, 2013

Happy Birthday, President George Albert Smith, born on 4 April 1870.

As they sometimes did with “landmark” presidential birthdays – President Smith turned 80 in 1950 – the Improvement Era featured that president with biographical articles and tributes in the April 1950 issue. This theme extended to the solicitation of advertisements. The result is fun to see, with even national advertisers adapting their no-doubt-professionally-directed advertising campaigns to a local message:

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8 Comments »

  1. Was there room in the magazine for any articles??!

    Comment by Alison — April 4, 2013 @ 6:54 am

  2. You wonder, don’t you?? And this isn’t even all the ads, not by a long shot. (But yes, there was still plenty of space for lots of articles and photos.)

    Comment by Ardis E. Parshall — April 4, 2013 @ 6:57 am

  3. I had to laugh at the little Utah Power and Light guy. I miss him. (We used to call it Utah Plunder and Loot.)

    These ads are really fun.

    Comment by Carol — April 4, 2013 @ 7:21 am

  4. Love the entry Ardis! The nice thing with George Albert Smith is that you get to celebrate his birthday on the same day you remember his death. It makes things easier that way.

    Comment by Brett D. — April 4, 2013 @ 9:25 am

  5. You had me singing praises to him ’till the The Ford Dealer Ad. I’m a Chevy man myself.

    Comment by Mex — April 4, 2013 @ 10:15 am

  6. I think my favorite is the one-upmanship of the Elias Morris ad: “In our NINETIETH year we congratulate you on your eightieth year.”

    Comment by Ardis E. Parshall — April 4, 2013 @ 10:40 am

  7. Interesting to note how many of these companies have fared in the intervening 63 years. Many of the household Utah business names have changed with mergers, acquisitions, and globalization. I remember Utoco, vaguely, and CF&I is now part of a Russian global steel company. Glen Bros. Music took a lot of my time growing up window shopping guitars, and even ZCMI is no more. But what the heck? Kolob Insurance? There may be no end to time and space, but apparently the same does not apply to insurance companies.

    Comment by kevinf — April 4, 2013 @ 11:38 am

  8. Kind of incredible that so many businesses submitted these specially-tailored ads. Great stuff – thanks for sharing.

    Comment by David Y. — April 5, 2013 @ 12:16 am

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