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Latter-day Saint Images, 1941 (2)

By: Ardis E. Parshall - February 05, 2013

Mormon life, 1941:

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Muskegon, Michigan

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Missionaries Leaving Salt Lake Missionary Home 25 June 1941

(first row, left to right:) Grant W. Heath, Willard B. Wilkinson, Marshall A. McEntire, Lloyd S. Sandberg, Rolla Dean Richey, Kay A. Schwendiman, Keith H. Clarke
(second row:) Leo S. Gerrard, Oreta Keaton, Alberta Farrimond, Rachel Christensen, President Don B. Colton, Fern Kitchen, Kathleen Hulet, June Gleave, William Romney
(third row:) William E. Berrett, George McMillan, Lynn Jenkins, Dorothy Miller, Ethel Jones, Lillian Lee, Maxine Miller, Marshall Ericson, Joseph Allen, Lyle E. Whitmer
(fourth row:) Aden V. Johnson, Neil H. Christensen, Lucian Melvin Mecham, Harold Perry Porter, Constance Spear, Virginia McQuarrie, Elizabeth Walker, Claire Bolton, Gerald N. Christensen
(fifth row:) Lee Winn Buttars, George Golden Stewart, Lillian Morley, Ruby Hasler, Albert A. Madsen, Robert R. McKay, Charles C. Orr, Joseph Stobbe
(sixth row:) Tyler A. Woolley, C. Brian O’Neil, Harold M. Stander, Calvin Guest, Grant Mann, T. Richard Muir, Joseph F. Patrick, W. Stanford Durrant, Joseph Perschon
(seventh row:) Mark R. Cram, William N. Wale, Fred R. Green, Glen E. Cracroft, Glenn L. Sorensen, Gail B. Horne, Donald Turner
(eighth row:) Orville Hancock, Alvin W. Barlow, Rex Sessions, Jack L. Huish, Robert F. Daynes, Floyd V. Israelson, Harry Postschlag
(ninth row:) Karl Caldwell, Earl R. Watts, Edwin C. Dean, Grant Fisher, Max Carleton Garrick, Andrew C. Knaphus
(tenth row:) R. Vernon Ricks, Robert Burton Ward, Robert Van Drimmelen,M.Dee Smith, Paul Toronto, Kent Werner
(eleventh row:) Kenneth R. Krey, D. Leon Johnson, Stuart M. Manookin, Donald C. Hughes, Wallace H. Allen

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Alton, Utah
Relief Society

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Grand Coulee Branch, Washington

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Cumorah Pageant

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Bakersfield, California
Welfare Home Building Project

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20 August 1941
Mormon Tabernacle Choir at Hollywood Bowl

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Garvanza, California
Junior Sunday School

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Heber J. Grant
Addressing Priesthood Session, 5 April 1941

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Idaho Falls 6th Ward
Trail Builder Twins

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Texas Missions
Gold and Green Ball Banquet

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Smithfield, Utah
Relief Society Pageant

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Oklahoma City Branch
Relief Society, Costumed as Members of Original Relief Society

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Malad, Idaho, 3rd Ward
Relief Society Candle Lighting Ceremony
(in the years before women were automatically enrolled in Relief Society, new members were sometimes welcomed with ceremonies like this one)

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Granite Stake (Salt Lake City)
Aaronic Priesthood Banquet

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Yuba City, California

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Hanksville, Utah
Singing Mothers

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Lamonte, Missouri
Home Sunday School



9 Comments »

  1. These are so sad considering how their lives were to be changed in a few months – particularly the missionary group and the Aaronic Priesthood of the Granite Stake.

    Comment by Grant — February 5, 2013 @ 7:36 am

  2. It’s hard to look at them without knowing the future, I agree.

    Comment by Ardis E. Parshall — February 5, 2013 @ 7:58 am

  3. It’s great when the publication in which a photograph appears captions it, especially when the caption includes names. I noticed William E. Berrett as one of the departing missionaries (third row, first person). In addition to being a career Church educator, and one of Ernest Wilkinson’s “lieutenants” at BYU, he was my stake patriarch. I still have a reasonably vivid memory of that day back in the early 1970s. Thanks, Ardis.

    Comment by Gary Bergera — February 5, 2013 @ 9:08 am

  4. I scanned the list of missionaries to see if there were any names I recognized. The elder on the far right of the eighth row, Harry Poetschlag, was an old friend–sort of. (And, by the way, there is a typo in his surname, either in your source or your transcription.)

    He was born in Koenigsberg, East Prussia, in 1920, emigrated with his family to Brooklyn, New York, sometime before 1932, which is the first year the Poetschlag family appears in my Brooklyn records. His mother was one of the ward organists beginning in 1935, succeeding the eminent Willy Reske–and in fact was still the organist in 1940 when the Brooklyn Ward celebrated the 21st anniversary of the dedication of their chapel.

    The Poetschlag family moved to Los Angeles sometime in the early 1940s–I don’t know whether that was before or after Harry left on his mission. They were members of the Inglewood Ward, where my mother, a native of Los Angeles, became acquainted with them.

    I have no idea where he served his mission. Europe had been at war for nearly two years, and, in fact, the Germans had attacked the Soviet Union just three days before that missionary photo was taken. So, he did not go back to his native land.

    Comment by Mark B. — February 5, 2013 @ 9:37 am

  5. The RS Ceremony remainds me when my mother was asked and sponsered by a Sister into RS. She was very honored and received a book and pin. After which she faithfully paid her dues. Different time and place.

    Comment by Mex — February 5, 2013 @ 10:28 am

  6. There is a Richey family in my ward. The oldest son left on a mission a couple months ago, and it came up that Brother Richey is one of sixteen children, every single one of which served as missionaries. I’ll have to ask Brother Richey if Rolla Dean Richey in the picture above is his father or uncle.

    Comment by John Mansfield — February 6, 2013 @ 11:01 am

  7. There’s my Dad in the photo of the departing missionaries! (8th row, 2nd from left)Alvin W. Barlow. He went to the Northern States Mission with headquarters in Chicago, with Leo J. Muir as their Mission President. In the Fall of the next year my mother was hired by the Muirs to be the cook in the Mission Home. She was only 17 years old! That’s where she really learned to cook for big crowds. :) And that’s where my parents met. My Dad said it was a little difficult as a missionary after Pearl Harbor. Nearly everyone they met would ask them why they weren’t off fighting in the War instead of trying to make people join their church. When his mission was finished, my Dad, like most returned missionaries then, joined a branch of the service.

    Comment by Andrea Rounds — December 27, 2013 @ 1:28 pm

  8. How fun, Andrea! I’m glad you spotted him — and thanks for the great comment!

    Comment by Ardis E. Parshall — December 27, 2013 @ 1:41 pm

  9. I am the daughter of Harry poetschlag. He went to the southern states on his mission and later served in the military stateside during ww2. He lived in California for the remainder of his life. He married Kathleen Saunders and had 4 children. He was a faithful member of the church. He died jan. 1992 .

    Comment by Diana poets half barrington — February 17, 2014 @ 7:54 pm

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