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My Love He Is a Mormonite

By: Ardis E. Parshall - December 05, 2012

From 1871 –

My Love He Is a Mormonite

My love he is a Mormonite, a Mormon to the letter,
And although he has a dozen wives, he loves me all the better;
Then faith! why puzzle my poor head at all in this strange matter,
For he’s told me very often that he loves me faithfully.

He loves me faithfully,
And this chap I love so dearly comes from Salt Lake City.
He loves me faithfully, he loves me faithfully
And this chap I love so dearly comes from Salt Lake City.

My love he is a gay young Saint with bigamites united.
Tho’ he’s often been in love before, with me he’s most delighted.
Ah! we’re a happy couple sure, our faith forever plighted,
For he’s told me very often that he loves me faithfully.

My heart is full of love for him, this gay young harem scarum,
Won’t I draw the reins around him tight, when once I’m in his harem.
His other wives will be so glad, you bet I will not spare him,
For he’s told me very often that he loves me faithfully.

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16 Comments »

  1. Ardis, just when I think you can’t trump the weird stuff you’ve found before, you come up with something like this. Amazing!

    Comment by Alison — December 5, 2012 @ 8:10 am

  2. A new verse for “If you could hie to Kolob”:

    There is no end to weirdness, there is no end to strange;
    There is no end to oddity, where history can derange.

    Comment by Ardis E. Parshall — December 5, 2012 @ 8:12 am

  3. Your new verse there ought to be the theme of every High Priests Group lesson I’ve ever been in.

    Comment by Grant — December 5, 2012 @ 8:46 am

  4. Oh my. It’s so weird it is hilarious. Where did you find this?

    Comment by Chocolate on my Cranium — December 5, 2012 @ 10:35 am

  5. It’s the theme, Grant, whether or not the class members recognize it!

    Found it in a search of the Library of Congress online goodies, Chocolate. The resolution there isn’t nearly as good as the scans I make myself when I have an object in hand — I can’t enlarge this much, but hope it’s readable enough that somebody can give us some report of the tune.

    Comment by Ardis E. Parshall — December 5, 2012 @ 10:57 am

  6. Oh, this is hilarious! It breaks into four-part chorus at the end!

    Somebody really put some work into this.

    Comment by David Y. — December 5, 2012 @ 12:32 pm

  7. I wonder if it is sung, and by whom and in what context. :-)

    Comment by Julia — December 5, 2012 @ 1:49 pm

  8. I like the fact that the publisher is noted as having offices in New York, Brooklyn and St. Louis.

    Comment by Mark B. — December 5, 2012 @ 7:52 pm

  9. Where is Keepa’s mystery organist when we need him/her?

    Comment by Maurine Ward — December 5, 2012 @ 8:59 pm

  10. I’ll add my vote for the Return of the Phantom. (Why have I always thought of Phantom as a male? Did you refer to Phantom as “he” when first presenting those Christmas carols, Ardis?)

    Okay, so today was the first chance I had to print this out and play through it. It sounds like a cross between Gilbert and Sullivan and Stephen Foster with a touch of Louis Moreau Gottschalk mixed in.

    It’s kind of catchy, actually. It would be a great selection for the next ward talent show, or the next Keepa ‘snacker, assuming we had all the parts.

    Comment by Amy T — December 6, 2012 @ 8:22 am

  11. A gem!

    Comment by Amy — December 6, 2012 @ 2:00 pm

  12. [still laughing]

    Comment by David Y. — December 6, 2012 @ 3:24 pm

  13. The Phantom is indeed a gentleman. I thought I had him convinced earlier this week to let me reveal his identity in connection with the list of Advents past … but his modesty kicked back in at the last moment. So let’s raise a toast to the talented and mysterious Phantom who plays among us.

    Comment by Ardis E. Parshall — December 6, 2012 @ 3:33 pm

  14. I think this must be one more reminder of my newbie status, but I have no idea what the phantom conversation refers to.

    Comment by Julia — December 6, 2012 @ 3:39 pm

  15. Several years ago at Christmas, Ardis put up historical Christmas music, and “The Phantom of the Chapel” sent in beautiful piano and organ recordings of the songs. Here’s a link.

    Comment by Amy T — December 6, 2012 @ 3:50 pm

  16. The Phantom also recorded a number of non-Christmas songs that I have occasionally posted, along with the printed music. Whatever I’m reading at the moment tends to be what ends up on Keepa, and I had forgotten that I still have a number of recordings around which to write posts.

    Comment by Ardis E. Parshall — December 6, 2012 @ 4:18 pm

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