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Old Folks’ Greetings

By: Ardis E. Parshall - November 08, 2012

Old Folks’ Greetings

By: Unknown

(Tune: “Count your many blessings”)

When you bowed, this morning, on your knees to pray,
Did you ask God’s blessings on the old folks’ day?
Have you come to greet them with a smiling face,
And dispel the sorrow from their gathering place?

Chorus:
Welcome, Grandma, with your locks of gray;
Welcome, Grandpa, to our feast today;
Cheer the old folks, greet them with a call,
Welcome to our banquet, welcome one and all.

In life’s battles ever they’ve been brave and true,
They have wrought and conquered, wrought for me and you;
Faced the hostile Indians, where the cactus grows,
Made the desert blossom as the fragrant rose.

Let us cheer the old folks, make them glad today,
Fill their souls with sunshine, help them on life’s way;’
Loving acts of kindness wield a power to save
Greater far than garlands strewn upon the grave.

Some have crossed the river, in the year just past,
Faithful to their children, faithful to the last;
May we ever follow in the path they’ve trod,
Faithful to each other, faithful to our God!

(1916)



5 Comments »

  1. Faced the hostile Indians, where the cactus grows,
    Made the desert blossom as the fragrant rose.

    Intriguing — it sounds particularly Mormony. Where was this published?

    Comment by David Y. — November 8, 2012 @ 4:18 pm

  2. Relief Society Magazine (all of the poetry for Tuesday and Thursday afternoons comes from Mormon sources, and I either recognize the poets as LDS or have some other good reason to be confident of Mormon authorship).

    I did a Tribune column about Old Folks’ Day, started in Utah by C.R. Savage. It doesn’t look like I ever posted that one to Keepa — I will, though, since many readers probably aren’t aware of that wonderful old custom.

    Comment by Ardis E. Parshall — November 8, 2012 @ 4:33 pm

  3. Okay, I’ve just posted Old Folks’ Day as background for this poem.

    Comment by Ardis E. Parshall — November 8, 2012 @ 6:57 pm

  4. It certainly comes across as Mormony.

    Comment by Julia — November 8, 2012 @ 8:38 pm

  5. Mormony, with a touch of Greek mythology in the line about “crossing the river.”

    Comment by lindberg — November 9, 2012 @ 4:01 pm

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