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A Jolly Hallowe’en with Deseret Book, 1926

By: Ardis E. Parshall - October 30, 2012

From the Juvenile Instructor, October 1926 —

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5 Comments »

  1. That’s a heck of a deal. The cheapest one of these available that I could find was $12.95
    http://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/1936049619/ref=redir_mdp_mobile

    Comment by Julia — October 30, 2012 @ 11:05 am

  2. I glanced at a previous version, now digitized. (Bogie Book 1920)

    The booklets were published by Dennison Manufacturing Company, a box and office products company, and seem to be a way to advertise their decorative paper products such as crepe paper and streamers. The 1920 book is a fun read. A suggested menu for a Halloween party:

    Vegetable Salad
    Brown Bread and Cream
    Cheese Sandwiches
    Pumpkin Pie
    Cheese
    Cider

    They also give a menu for “The Business Girl’s Hallowe’en Party,” items that “will not require much time to prepare”:

    Fruit Cocktail
    Chicken Patties
    Potato Chips
    Ice Cream
    Individual Cakes
    Coffee

    (How could chicken patties not take much time to prepare back in those days before frozen foods? Was it something you purchased at the butcher or at a restaurant?)

    I particularly like the suggestion of Brown Bread and Cream for a Halloween party. Perhaps I’ll try serving that tomorrow. : )

    Comment by Amy T — October 30, 2012 @ 11:44 am

  3. One more note: the Dennison company was in Massachusetts, so when they say “brown bread,” that didn’t mean wheat bread, it meant a dark wheat-rye-cornmeal-fruit bread baked in a round coffee can. And that reminds me that my mother used to bake wheat bread in coffee cans — who knows where she got the cans due to that Word of Wisdom thing we do, but probably from a neighbor — but I haven’t seen that done in many years.

    (Boston Brown Bread.)

    Comment by Amy T — October 30, 2012 @ 11:59 am

  4. My mother used to bake cinnamon bread in what I think were Hi-C cans — taller and thinner than coffee cans. (I suppose the can could be used repeatedly, which would explain why we didn’t need to have Hi-C at our house…)

    Comment by Paul — October 30, 2012 @ 12:25 pm

  5. Thanks Amy T and Julia! I’m having a great time looking through those!

    Comment by Mina — October 30, 2012 @ 9:00 pm

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