Keepapitchinin, the Mormon History blog » Things Worth Knowing, 1911 (3)
 


Things Worth Knowing, 1911 (3)

By: Ardis E. Parshall - September 13, 2012

Deranged kidneys, lime deposits, ants in your pants … er, pantry — there’s advice in the Young Woman’s Journal for just about everything a young woman wanted to know in 1911.

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White-washing the cellar once or twice a year will save doctor’s bills.

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A yeast cake can be kept fresh for days by burying it in flour.

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Clothes sprinkled with hot water will dampen more readily, and can be ironed sooner. Use a clean whisk broom to sprinkle with.

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Vegetables will take longer to cook but be much greener and nicer if left uncovered while cooking.

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A little grated cheese improves chicken soup.

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Never use gasoline near a hot stove or fire; it is very explosive. If you wish the gasoline warm, put in a tin can and immerse the can in boiling water.

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After the usual cleaning of white or colored kid gloves, put the gloves on and rub the hands in corn meal. This will remove the odor of gasoline and give the gloves a fresh look.

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Spinach is better than mineral waters for kidney derangement.

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When finely chopped nuts are needed for cakes, salads or sandwiches run the nuts through the meat chopper.

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Never lay a greasy spoon down on the table. It leaves a stain that is hard to remove, is uncleanly, and makes extra work.

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The lime deposit which forms in teakettles can be removed by boiling vinegar in the kettle.

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Do not thrust a fork into roasting meat, or the juices will run out and spoil the flavor.

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To wipe hardwood floors around carpets, put a soft cloth over a broom and use plenty of turpentine in the water.

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Old flannels of all kinds should be kept for scrubbing and cleaning paint.

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To keep ants out of your pantry, wipe your shelves with a cloth dipped in kerosene, then sprinkle borax in the corners.

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Try sipping a cup of warm milk, with a pinch of salt and pepper in it, before going to bed. It will bring on a good night’s sleep.

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For ant bites, use salt and cider vinegar, all the salt the vinegar will dissolve.

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Mud stains can be sponged from white fabrics by using a little ammonia and soapy water.

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For “creaking” shoes, soak the soles in linseed oil. Put a small quantity in a pan or plate and let the shoes soak about twenty-four hours.

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Handkerchiefs will have a faint odor of violets if a small piece of orris-root is put in the water in which they are boiled.

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It is never perfectly safe to put a sealed can in hot water to heat. Turn the contents into a sauce pan, thereby avoiding a possible explosion.

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To prevent preserves from molding, place a piece of oiled paper on top of the fruit, and on this pour a tablespoonful of brandy. Then put on the top.

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After scrubbing potatoes to bake, grease them with lard or cottolene, and the outer skins will come off readily when they are served.

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Tomatoes may be stuffed with any mixture that is improved by the addition of tomato catsup – meat, fish, rice, macaroni, or other vegetables.

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When making an apron, the pocket will not tear if a piece of straight goods is stitched in between the pocket and apron.

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When cleaning house use plenty of turpentine in the scrub water. It is certain death to moths.

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When making jam put six or eight marbles in the pan. The movement of the marbles in the pan keeps the jam from sticking.

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Mint and parsley may be raised in bowls in your kitchen window, thus you will always have a supply of fresh herbs for seasoning.

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Window shades that seem faded may often be made to do good service for months to come. Reverse them.

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If common table salt is added to gasoline, spots can be removed from silk or other fabric without leaving a ring.

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If you have not an apple corer at hand try a clothes pin.

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To remove ink spots from the end of your finger moisten them and rub with the sulphur end of a match.

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Apply a raw onion to the sting of a wasp or bee to relieve the pain.

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Anaemic children will be benefited if rubbed all over with olive oil after each meal.

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Epsom salts, dissolved in hot water and applied to a window with a brush will give it the appearance of ground glass.

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Have a jar handy in which to save any fruit juice or sweetened water, and you will soon have a jar of nice vinegar.

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Greasing pie tins with butter helps to brown the under crust, and prevents the pie from being soggy.

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To prevent dropped stitches from running down the leg of stockings, make a tuck in the leg just above the knee.

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When baking powder and spice can covers are hard to remove, lay them on the floor, then with the foot just below the cover, roll them back and forth a few times. They will come off easily.

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The best way to stop ordinary nose bleed is to press with the fingers on the upper lip below the nostril.

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A tablespoonful of salt added to the water in which a cracked egg is to be boiled will prevent the white from escaping.

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When baby falls and gets a bad bruise, apply butter to the affected part, and the skin will not discolor.

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It is a good plan to have individual markings for bath towels and wash cloths. The initials may be done in chain stitch.

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Soda is fine for cleaning tin-ware.

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When roasting meat add just a few drops of vinegar to the water used for basting, to make the meat more tender.

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A tablespoonful of kerosene in the first laundry suds cuts the rubbing in half. A spoonful in starch imparts a fine gloss to your starched clothes.



14 Comments »

  1. This is so useful. I had no idea that gasoline was so explosive and should not be used near a hot stove or flames. On those many occasions when I want to warm my gasoline, I will be careful to warm it in water that is not boiling near a hot stove. Great advice. Don’t you just hate cold gasoline?

    Comment by Left Field — September 13, 2012 @ 7:05 am

  2. It’s a good thing our ancestors seem to have alternately taken or ignored this advice, or they’d all have died of explosions, burns, poisoning, malnutrition, various chemical-based birth defects, and bleeding to death well before any of us came along.

    (Not to mention those greased children.) (!)

    Comment by Amy T — September 13, 2012 @ 7:42 am

  3. I’m wondering if the same remedy would work for anaemic adults. And just how “all” is “all over”?

    Comment by Mark B. — September 13, 2012 @ 7:56 am

  4. I wonder if we ought to start keeping a jar or two of gasoline around the house. Also turpentine.

    Comment by Stephen Taylor — September 13, 2012 @ 8:11 am

  5. Goodness! Thanks for the great tidbits. Definitely, with the cost of gas, do not let it explode! Off to purchase brandy for my preserves…..

    Comment by gretchen — September 13, 2012 @ 9:53 am

  6. These are weird and wonderful! I knew the one about putting salt in the pan when boiling eggs, though; I always do that. Must try the onion tip on the next family spat with an insect. And Ardis, perhaps brandy is more commonly kept in the homes of Saints than we previously suspected…

    Comment by Alison — September 13, 2012 @ 10:51 am

  7. A little grated cheese improves anything.

    I wonder, though, if I could throw a bit of orris-root in the washing machine? I’d dearly love everything to smell faintly of violets…

    Comment by Mina — September 13, 2012 @ 11:12 am

  8. I guess turpentine, gasoline, vinegar and brandy will fix everything.

    The scientist in me wants to explore why these remedies might work. The fruit juice to vinegar is easy to figure out. Even the whitewash-the-cellar-for-your-health bit makes sense, since about 60% of the air in our homes enters through the basement. But a few are just random.

    FWIW, the homemade remedy/cleaning supply trend is still going strong.

    Comment by The Other Clark — September 13, 2012 @ 1:41 pm

  9. LeftField beat me to the punch, and likely expressed the comment more wittily than I would have.

    Comment by HokieKate — September 13, 2012 @ 2:00 pm

  10. So when the lid to the baking powder or spice jar comes off oh so easily as you roll the thing around underfoot, how on earth should you clean up the mess on the floor??

    And, it’s clear that they don’t make clothes pins the way they used to.

    Comment by Mark B. — September 13, 2012 @ 2:43 pm

  11. If ever a post called for Youtube videos and internet memes that unfortunately were not available in 1911, this one positively screams for it. Flaming kitchens, buttered up babies, linseed oil soaked shoes (love to see that in the rain), plus a lolcats of an old, incontinent cat with the caption: “Deranged Kidneys: I no haz it, I IZ it!”

    More, please!

    Comment by kevinf — September 13, 2012 @ 3:37 pm

  12. Hmmm, the warning on my washing machine about flammable liquids actually makes sense now that I read these tips involving gasoline and turpentine to clean fabric.

    Comment by soleil — September 13, 2012 @ 4:28 pm

  13. So many warnings make more sense.

    I still can’t figure out the anemia one. I have had intermittent anemia, since the birth of my first child, and none of the specialists has ever suggested Olive Oil. I wonder how much I would need to rub on to stop eating liver and other high iron foods?

    I can just picture, in my mind’s eye, slippery babies falling to the floor when grandma isn’t aware they are being “treated.” Keep that butter on hand! (I wonder how many weight watchers points all that butter and olive oil would count as?)

    Does anyone have any idea WHY gasoline that is cold is so inferior?

    Comment by Julia — September 15, 2012 @ 5:44 am

  14. Just this past weekend I planted mint in a bowl on my kitchen windowsill. Halleujah! I know something worth knowing
    :-)

    Comment by Anne (U.K.) — September 18, 2012 @ 3:48 am

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