Keepapitchinin, the Mormon History blog » Latter-day Saint Images, 1927 (4)
 


Latter-day Saint Images, 1927 (4)

By: Ardis E. Parshall - September 06, 2012

I know it’s only been a few days since we had an Images post, but I’m running late this morning so have no time to write — I hope you enjoy these!

.

.

.

.

Liberty Stake, Utah
Pageant

.

.

.

Huntington, California

.

12th Ward, Mt. Ogden Stake
Winners of Church-wide Competition
MIA Ladies’ Chorus and Pianist

.

Maori Agricultural College Band

.

Hana Branch, Maui, Hawaii

.

Burley 2nd Ward, Idaho
Parents’ Class, Sunday School

.

Auburn, Wyoming

.

Torrance, California
Relief Society

.

St. Paul, Minnesota
Relief Society

.

Petersburg, Virginia

.

Osdick, California
(Mining town in Mojave Desert)

.

Missionaries of
Lyon and Marseilles, France

.

LDS Scouts
Interlaken, Swiss-German Mission

.

Portland, Oregon
M Men Basketball Team

..

Martinez, California

.

Logan Square Branch
Chicago, Illinois
Fathers and Sons Outing at
Forest Preserve on Desplaines River

.

Kelsey, Texas

.

BYU Music Faculty
(left to right:) W.F. Hansen, Ralph Booth, Carl Busch, Leroy Robertson,
Lowry Nelson, J.W. McAllister, Robert Saur

.

Blackfoot 1st Ward, Idaho
Sunday School

.

Berkeley, California

.

Berkeley, California
Relief Society

.

Milford, Utah
Seagull Girls (Primary 11-year-olds)

.

Lewiston, Idaho
4-year-olds

.

Auckland, New Zealand
Sunday School

.

Bay St. Louis, Mississippi
Spaghetti Picnic

.

Lakeshore Ward, Utah
Bluebirds (Primary 10-year-olds)

.



13 Comments »

  1. Blue Birds and Seagulls……why did we stop giving the classes fun names?

    Julia
    poetrysansonions.blogspot.com

    Comment by Julia — September 6, 2012 @ 8:04 am

  2. I find it interesting that the Kelsey, Texas photo has no qualifiers in the caption. It wasn’t the Sunday School or some other auxillary; just Kelsey, Texas. The aproximately 200 people in this photo probably weren’t all of Kelsey, but by 1927 the population was below its peak of 750 a few years earlier.

    Comment by Bruce Crow — September 6, 2012 @ 8:17 am

  3. Julia- Today’s Primary class names are even duller than they were when I was a child. In the 1990′s we had the Merry Miss, Blazers, Stars, and several others. Now it’s just Sunbeams, CTR [age], and Valiant [age].

    Comment by HokieKate — September 6, 2012 @ 9:35 am

  4. Always fun to look at, but I would please ask you to send me a copy of the Burley picture. Looking for more of my wife’s relatives, including possibly her grandparents.

    I’ll also echo the dull primary class names. I remember for the boys Trekkers, Blazers, Top Pilots, and Co-Pilots amongst my childhood memories. Yes, I really am that old. I just don’t feel like it.

    Comment by kevinf — September 6, 2012 @ 10:07 am

  5. That last photo of the 10-year-old girls prompts the question: Were there uniforms for primary?

    Comment by The Other Clark — September 6, 2012 @ 10:12 am

  6. TOClark, the girls’ classes did sometimes have elements of uniforms (hat, or headband) but not usually full uniforms (some Beehive classes of that era *did* wear class uniforms). There are differences in the collars and necklines and sleeve length of the outfits in that picture that make me suppose that they weren’t uniforms, per se, but that since they were going to have their picture taken that day, maybe the girls all agreed to wear their best white blouses, probably something that was standard for school clothes, just so they’d look nice. (Kind of like the Relief Society Singing Mothers always wore dark skirts and white blouses because they were all presumed to have such basic items, even though no two blouses matched each other.)

    Comment by Ardis E. Parshall — September 6, 2012 @ 10:56 am

  7. I loved the old Primary names: Moonbeams, Sunbeams and Stars; Co-Pilots and Top Pilots (there was another one now, briefly, that I can’t think of — spaceship related) — together these were referred to as the Skylet-Pilot classes. Depending on era, there were Larks, Bluebirds and Seagulls, or Gaynotes, Firelights, and Merrihands (collectively the Lihomas, or LIttle HOme MAkers), or Merrie Miss. There were Zion’s Boys and Zion’s Girls — the ZBs and ZGs — and Targeteers, and Valiants, and Rainbows. The boys were Trekkers and Blazers and Guides. There were probably others I’m not remembering at the time. Each class had its own song, and symbol and motto, and sometimes colors, and sometimes uniform elements (bandlo, or beanie, or shoulder patch, or flight wings, or jewelry). I think that probably all originated from the adult club movement of the early 20th century, where you “belonged to” a club or class or lodge that had all of those trappings of membership. Now we have only the anemic vestiges of that colorful early and mid 20th century world.

    Comment by Ardis E. Parshall — September 6, 2012 @ 11:03 am

  8. I still have a hard time not calling 11 year old scouts Blazers.

    I really do wonder why we had the change to the current names. Sunbeams seem to be the only name that really means anything.

    Julia
    poetrysansonions.blogspot.com

    Comment by Julia — September 6, 2012 @ 11:14 am

  9. Hurray for the cool photo of the BYU music faculty (says this proud graduate of the BYU music department). Especially fun to see a young Leroy Robertson, composer of numerous hymns in our hymnal, as well as the colossal “Oratorio from the Book of Mormon” (more here).

    Comment by David Y. — September 6, 2012 @ 11:27 am

  10. here is an interesting bio of someone from Osdick (now Red Mountain) born there in 1928. Perhaps he is the little one in the far right of the picture.

    http://jelly-pepektheassassin.blogspot.com/2006/11/brother.html

    Comment by Ola Senor — September 6, 2012 @ 1:16 pm

  11. “Osdick”? All I could think of was Al Capp’s famous cartoon character, from the day the F key on his typewriter was broken: “earless osdick.”

    I think the “Rainbows” continued down into the time I was in Primary–but Moonbeams may have arrived after I did. I was a Sunbeam and Star and Rainbow and Co-Pilot and Top-Pilot (complete with a plastic wing badge!), and then when we left the girls behind it was on to Blazers and Trekkers and the Guide Patrol. Those were, as they say, the days, my friend.

    And, there’s still a congregation at Logan Square in Chicago. That name brought back a flood of dimming memories!

    Comment by Mark B. — September 7, 2012 @ 11:07 am

  12. those LDS Scouts in the Swiss German Mission,
    was that by chance 1914?

    Comment by Jpaul — September 10, 2012 @ 6:23 pm

  13. These were all in 1927 publications. It’s possible that some were taken in 1926 and were in the pipeline for a few months, but I don’t have any reason to suspect that any were taken that many years before publication.

    Comment by Ardis E. Parshall — September 10, 2012 @ 6:29 pm

Leave a comment

RSS feed for comments on this post.
TrackBack URI