Keepapitchinin, the Mormon History blog » Latter-day Saint Images, 1917 (2)
 


Latter-day Saint Images, 1917 (2)

By: Ardis E. Parshall - June 20, 2012

Back to 1917 for another page from the great Mormon family photo album —

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Anaconda, Montana . . .

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Oasis, Utah

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Rock Springs, Wyoming
Sunday School

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Basalt, Idaho

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Hikaeru, Tuamoto Islands (Tahiti Mission)
Relief Society

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Williamsburg Sunday School
(Branch of Gray’s Lake Ward, Idaho)

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Liberty Stake (Salt Lake City) 1st Ward
Red Cross Workers

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Eureka, Utah
Sunday School

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Orton, Alberta

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Relief Society of Honolulu, Hawaii
Laying Leis at Monument on Kamahemahe Day

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Scout Rally in Deseret Gymnasium
Salt Lake City, Utah

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Waterloo Ward (Salt Lake City)
Scouts at Work in War Garden

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St. Johns Arizona
Wheelchair Donated by MIA

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Grantsville, Utah
Sunday School Class

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Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
Relief Society

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Tooele, Utah
Scouts in Great Salt Lake

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Joppa, Arizona
Sunday School

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Medicine Hat, Alberta
Sunday School

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Provo 6th Ward Sunday School

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Rawlins, Wyoming

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9 Comments »

  1. Odds are the girl in the wheelchair is there because of polio. It’s a stark reminder that our pioneer forebears had to accept as part of life some things we just don’t have to deal with today.

    Comment by Vader — June 20, 2012 @ 7:55 am

  2. Vader has a valid point. There was a major Poliomyelitis outbreak in the United States in 1916. On a non-LDS and hopefully not thread jacking note, at one time polio survivors made up one of the largest groups of people with disabilities in the U.S.. They played a major role in the fight for civil rights for people with disabilities and helped to get the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 passed.

    Comment by andrew h — June 20, 2012 @ 9:49 am

  3. On a LDS related wheelchair note, it is nice to see that way back then the Church was helping to liberate people with wheelchairs (Ardis am I out of line if I make the point that people are liberated by, not “bound to” wheelchairs?) The effort goes on today:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7TndfX1JvsU

    http://www.dailymotion.com/video/xhwzyy_mormon-church-gave-riques-a-wheelchair_news

    And now back to Ardis’s regularly scheduled post on LDS history pictures. Sorry for the thread jack.

    Comment by andrew h — June 20, 2012 @ 10:00 am

  4. I particularly enjoyed the photo of the Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania Relief Society, since I joined the church in Pittsburgh with my parents and siblings 50 years later. We used to hear old stalwarts (who seemed really old to me, then age 9) talk about the history of the chuch in Pittsburgh in their testimonies.

    Comment by Paul — June 20, 2012 @ 10:15 am

  5. I am not familiar with Joppa, Arizona, so I did a google search, and came up with Joppa Hair & Nails at the Desert Sky Mall on Thomas Road, in Phoenix. The ladies in that picture do appear to be well coiffed. Anybody know anything else about Joppa?

    Comment by kevinf — June 20, 2012 @ 11:18 am

  6. It’s apparently now known as Aripine, kevinf, in Navajo County. At least, some genealogists have recorded family births as “in Joppa, now Aripine, Navajo, Arizona.”

    Comment by Ardis E. Parshall — June 20, 2012 @ 11:37 am

  7. Aripine has made a previous appearance in the Bloggernacle–in Times and Seasons about two years ago.

    As one of comments on that thread mentioned, the Turley family ran a boys ranch out there. What it doesn’t mention is that one of the Turley girls, Wanda, was the prettiest girl in my dad’s graduating class (1943) at Snowflake High School.

    Comment by Mark B. — June 20, 2012 @ 12:17 pm

  8. Orton! I have ancestors who lived in Orton. Next time I see you I’ll have to ask where the photo came from. I’m soure one of those is Aunt Lilly
    Lilly Thelin

    Comment by Jpaul — June 22, 2012 @ 7:09 pm

  9. My father was born at Joppa, Arizona, in 1915, long before it became Aripine. It definitely had nothing to do with shopping in the Valley of the Sun! We went there for a family reunion visit back in the 1950’s or so; there was absolutely nothing left there. I picked up a souvenir from among the ruins, a little white ceramic 3-monkey piece – “see no evil, speak no evil, hear no evil” – probably the only “toy” some child had?

    Comment by Diane Ellerton — June 23, 2014 @ 7:32 am

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