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Latter-day Saint Images, 1920 (2)

By: Ardis E. Parshall - May 08, 2012

Latter-day Saints, at worship and play, in 1920:

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Relief Society of the Leper Settlement at Kaluapapa, Hawaii . . .

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Missionaries of Gridley Conference, California Mission

(left to right, top:) L.R. Halvorson, V.A. Blomquist, G.L. Robison, R.F. Robinson. (fourth row:) C.W. Green, Ove C. Inkley, A. Allred, C.A. Frost, C.W. Magleby, C.B. Flint. (third row:) Alma Stevens, L.K. Woolf, J.J. Peterson, A.C. Nielsen, Eli Searle, H.D. Sorenson, L.M. Hanson. (second row:) F.P. May, F.A. Smart, John C. Brown, W.D. Hill, Jens Jacobsen, M.J. Clark, W. Jenkins. (front:) Evelyn C. Hodges, La Vora Smith, Clara N. Hodges, William N. Hodges, Mission President Joseph W. McMurrin, C.C. Cornwall, A.E. Bushman, Lydia W. Bushman and children Glen and Merle.

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St. Joseph, Missouri, Relief Society

(left to right, top:) Pearl Holt, Carrie Carr, Julia Roach, Elizabeth Burlington, Florence Crawford. (middle:) Buela Kealley, Gladys Kealley, Lenora Neilson, Bessie Burlington, Elise Browich. (front:) Rosellea Guthris, Martha Kealley, Rose Hull, Sarah George, Mabel Christensen.

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Wichita, Kansas
Chapel dedicated 5 December 1920

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San Bernardino, California, Relief Society

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Independence, Missouri, YLMIA

(left to right, front:) Melba Tuckfield, Kay Ireland, Hazel Schleich. (second row:) Ada McClain, Clarene T. Quinn, Lottie T. Bennion, Isabelle Ireland. (third row:) Nellie Wright, Naomi Officer, Mabel Ireland, Irene Brown, Ethel Kane. (top:) Alma Childers, Bessie Edwards, Cleo Salisbury, Delia Hansen, Helen Ireland.

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Missionaries of the Albany Conference, New York

(left to right, top:) James E. Robinson, John A. Donaldson. (fourth row:) Thomas L. Gerrard, Sidney N. Parkinson, Karl H. Pomeroy, Nelson A. Hogan, Wesley G. Howell, Ralph B. Keeler, Ezra E. Johnson. (third row:) Alfred N. Knight, Gordon L. Jenkins, Melvin D. Wells, Bertrand R. Godfrey, Sherman C. Robinson, Earl R. Belnap. (second row:) Henrietta Bott, Irene Edmunds, Carl B. Ship (local elder), Arthur H. Taylor, Tacy Irons, Sadie Kramer. (front:) George S. Beckstead, John Soelberg, Karl H. Cutler, George W. McCune, A. Earl Worlton, Harold H. Hart, Thomas W. Tanner.

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Women Who Knew Joseph Smith

(left to right, standing:) Mary Yearsley Cummings, Margaret J. Taylor. (front:) Sarah Jenne Cannon, Emmeline B. Wells, Sarah E. Rushton.

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Grantsville, Utah, Beehive Girls

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MIA Scout Band in front of Hotel Utah (now Joseph Smith Memorial Building), Salt Lake City

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Missionaries in Japan

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Branch Picnic, Sidney, Australia

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Cincinnati, Ohio
Relief Society

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Missionaries of San Francisco Conference, California Mission

(left to right, front:) Floyd Christensen, Edgar Johnson, Spencer C. Taylor, Seymour R. Greene, Lynn C. Layton, Joseph E. Larkin, Leonard W. Aamodt, Wallace J. Cook. (second row:) Alice McKee, Lawrence K. Lattimer, Lois Lattimer and child, Claude C. Cornwall, Wilford W. Richards, Mission President Joseph W. McMurrin, Louisa W. Jones, Christian Jorgensen, Beatrice Larsen, Ezra E. Larsen. (third row:) Helen Bennion, Gertie Child, Margaret E. Carroll, Delilah Moss, Marie Hill, Sarah A. Howard, Eva Miller, Delila Stoker, Luella Anderson, Lavora Smith, Edith Larsen. (fourth row:) George C. Knapp, Henry M. Stark, Stanley Brady, Delbert C. Tyler, Merle G. Stockdale, Leo R. Balle, Oliver Williams, John Wiscombe, Ralph L. Mellor. (top:) John V. Kirby, James Stringham, Reed Miller, Philbert C. Lind, Andrew Johanson, J. Virgil Lowe, Joseph I. Bodily, George J. Ward.

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Beehive Girls of Jerome, Arizona

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Scouts from Salt Lake City en route to the Grand Canyon

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Relief Society of Trinidad, Colorado

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Beaver, Utah, East Ward Beehive Girls

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Cassia Stake, Idaho, Fathers and Sons Outing

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Flag Ceremony, MIA June Conference

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Wasatch Stake, Utah, Scout Leadership



10 Comments »

  1. Scouts sleeping aside the road on their way to the Grand Canyon (!) I did that once in the 1970s somewhere near Rexburg on the way to the Salmon River (from Wyoming). It looks kind of like one of those Civil War after-the-battle scenes (yikes!)

    I showed Linda the Scout Pictures (Hotel Utah, Sleeping in the Field, Wasatch Scouters) and she would sure like to have copies for her LDS Scouting Centennial (2013) collection!

    Many thanks, Ardis.

    Comment by Grant — May 8, 2012 @ 6:51 am

  2. Drat!!! I never got to wear cool white suits while serving in Japan. I was obviously born in the wrong era. No Brother-Brigham-beards either. Double Drat.

    Comment by Chad too — May 8, 2012 @ 2:23 pm

  3. …or have a wife. Or father children.

    Comment by Chad too — May 8, 2012 @ 2:24 pm

  4. That’s the secondary purpose of Keepa, Chad, to create discontented readers who now feel they were born out of time!

    Comment by Ardis E. Parshall — May 8, 2012 @ 2:28 pm

  5. I’m intrigued by the photo of the “Women Who Knew Joseph Smith.” It reminds me of the group photos I’ve seen of “Wives of Brigham Young” from the 1890’s. It makes me wonder what influence or sway these “survivors” had on their surrounding Church culture. I doubt many of them trumpeted their “status,” but, in my mind’s eye, I can imagine a turn-of-the-century scene where some ward member whispers reverentially to another, “See that sister coming through the chapel doors? She’s Brigham Young’s widow!” Or some Relief Society instructor advising the group to give heed to a class member’s opinion “because she knew Joseph Smith!”

    Comment by David Y. — May 8, 2012 @ 3:31 pm

  6. Chad too: you forgot to mention the bow tie in the picture of missionaries to Japan.

    Comment by Maurine Ward — May 8, 2012 @ 8:09 pm

  7. I coulda gotten away with a bowtie under my second mission president, not likely under the first. Neither would have approved of the kids.

    Comment by Chad Too — May 8, 2012 @ 8:22 pm

  8. Brigham’s widows were very well known to the members of the Church that lived in downtown Salt Lake City. They supported each other as they got older. As a group they also had a close relationship with his children who cared for them. Even those that did not have children were cared for in their old age by the family.

    Comment by Jeff Johnson — May 9, 2012 @ 1:03 am

  9. Thanks for that, Jeff.

    Comment by David Y. — May 9, 2012 @ 9:31 am

  10. I wonder if any of the women in the San Bernardino Relief Society picture were children of the original settlers of San Bernardino who stayed in the area and didn’t return to Utah, or if they’re early members of the outmigration.

    Comment by Amy T — May 9, 2012 @ 9:53 am

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