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Latter-day Saint Images, 1914 (2)

By: Ardis E. Parshall - November 02, 2011

More glimpses of our people in 1914:

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The long of it: A. Virgil Tollestrup (Cedar City, Utah); the short of it: Leonard C. Rynearson (Murray, Utah), at a Southern States Mission conference in Atlanta

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Towanda, Pennsylvania

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Fort Peck Reservation, Wolf Point, Montana
Elders Frank W. Warner and Peter E. Anderson

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San Francisco, California

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Frankburg, Alberta

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Lead, South Dakota

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Lead, South Dakota

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Lamison, Alabama
New chapel, built at a cost of about $1,000, half of which — including labor — was donated by non-Mormon neighbors

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Fresno, California

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Muncie, Indiana

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Milwaukee, Wisconsin, Young Adult Sunday School Class Annual Outing
(left to right) Madge Hill, Eric H. Laabs, Archie E. Tonsor, May Lang, Delorice Eberle,
George Chesky, Clara Vogler, Bruno Weiss, Hattie Lucht

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Dillon, Montana

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Buchanan, Georgia

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Berthold Reservation (some members, some “interested”)

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Bandon, Oregon

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Temple Square

(You recognize the Temple Annex from earlier posts. The minaret is the smokestack for the temple heating plant; note how the coal smoke from that plant, as well as other coal-burning facilities in Salt Lake, had begun to turn the temple black — the entire building was blackened before cleaner fuels came into general use, and the temple was finally scrubbed down years later.)

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Salt Lake 20th Ward
Beautifying Grounds for Decoration Day

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Carthage Jail

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Elders of the West Virginia Conference: (left to right) Joseph E. Wheeler, Arthur Gardner, Arthur H. Rex,
Hyrum S. Arnoldson, David W. Nicholas, H.W. Taylor, Rowland Creger, Milton K. Noble

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A church service somewhere in the Ozarks

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Sister (“Lady”) Missionaries of the Central States Mission: (left to right) back: Ellen Mackay, Elsie Gerard, Bertha Breadshall,
Inez Christiansen, Goldie Adams, Eva Wrathall, Isabelle Campbell, Ina Leigh, Amy Winters, Adella Haynie
middle: Elizabeth Ritchie, Zada Smith, Minnie Shaw, Mrs. Samuel O. Bennion, Mrs. Joseph E. Cardon, Nettie Rose, Viola Davis, Bertha Perry
front: May Davis, Vera Marsden, Mary E. Lufkin, Grace Salmon, Margaret Newman, Pearl Butterfield, Charlotte Baker

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Northwest Virginia Conference

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Nine Mile, Anaconda, Montana

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West Colorado Conference: (left to right) Mrs. Geo. McDermaid, Martha Davis, John A. Hooper, Catherine Marchant, Frances Boardman,
Jane W. Herrick, Lewis D. Robison, Pres. John L. Herrick, Josephine Herrick, Daniel C. Allen, Charles W. Singleton, Joseph M. Jones

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Purple Springs, Alberta

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9 Comments »

  1. Yikes! If that is what coal smoke was doing that to the Temple and other buildings, I would hate to think about what was it doing to peoples lungs.

    Comment by andrew h — November 2, 2011 @ 7:07 am

  2. Love that picture of the sister missionaries! I see one name I know in there — one of my pioneer families is named Marsden and I unfortunately know very little about them. In fact, much of what I know about them besides names and dates came from an amazing post you wrote a couple of years ago, Ardis, Sarah Wheatcroft: Service for the Dead.

    Comment by Researcher — November 2, 2011 @ 7:26 am

  3. It gives me shudders, too, andrew h. This picture also helps me understand how eager people were to find a solution to the coal smoke problem. Orestes Utah Bean, the author of Corianton, held the patent on a device that trapped smoke before it was released into the air; the fortune he made with that patent is what financed Corianton’s brief Broadway run.

    Thanks for reminding me of that post, Researcher. Do you remember the post about My Mission’s Brightest Moment? The missionary who had earlier found and taught the husband in that family was named Charlie Marsden — a cousin of yours, I wonder?

    Comment by Ardis E. Parshall — November 2, 2011 @ 8:42 am

  4. I love the old pictures.

    I was shocked at how quickly the temple was blackened by the smoke–given that the temple had been in use for a little over 20 years when this picture was taken.

    Comment by Steve C. — November 2, 2011 @ 9:05 am

  5. My great-grandmother, Leora Cook, served in the Central States mission in the 1920s. Ten years too late!

    Comment by Matt — November 2, 2011 @ 9:06 am

  6. What fun these are! I love the little girls in bloomers, the girls with humongus bows in their hair, the people spread out all over a boulder the size of a house – well at least a modest cabin – and especially the long & short of it!

    Just right for today…

    Comment by Diane Peel — November 2, 2011 @ 11:27 am

  7. What an eclectic and interesting round up of pictures, today, Ardis. Really fascinating!

    Comment by Mina — November 2, 2011 @ 2:16 pm

  8. Who knew? Two separate congregations in Lead, South Dakota! [wink]

    Love these photos. May this series never come to an end.

    Comment by David Y. — November 2, 2011 @ 2:56 pm

  9. I liked the elders with their hats and satchels.They had such a look of determination on their faces.

    Comment by Maurine Ward — November 3, 2011 @ 1:01 am

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