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Latter-day Saint Images, 1935

By: Ardis E. Parshall - October 17, 2011

We were all over the world, doing all kinds of things, in 1935 —

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Beehive Girls of Rotterdam, Holland  .

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Elders Serving in North Carolina
Left: Chester G. Harris (local Catawba elder), 5’4″
B. Dwaine Madsen, 6’4″

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Logan, Utah
Leaders at Seminary Graduation

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Takaroa, Tuomatu Islands, Tahiti Mission

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Gold and Green Ball
Star Valley, Wyoming

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Auckland, New Zealand
Gleaner Girl Basketball Team

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Aurora, Utah
Beehive Girls at Fish Lake

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Cape Town, South Africa
MIA Banquet

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Gold and Green Ball Royalty
Whitewater Branch, California Mission

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Houston, Texas
MIA Banquet

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Medford, Oregon

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Circleville, Utah

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Wandamere Ward (Salt Lake City)
Adult Hobby Show

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Oslo, Norway, Singing Sisters

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Logan (Utah) 5th Ward
Vanball Co-Champs

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Minneapolis, Minnesota, Relief Society

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14 Comments »

  1. I wondered what on earth “vanball” was, and found nothing useful on the first few pages of Google results, and then this appeared in a biography of L. Tom Perry:

    As an Explorer Scout, Elder Perry played vanball, a modified form of volleyball.

    No telling how it was modified.

    Comment by Mark B. — October 17, 2011 @ 8:48 am

  2. Mark, I’ve been wanting to do a post on vanball for a couple of years now. I’ve collected pictures, and stories of the boys playing, and the rules … but the rules don’t really tell how it was played! They’re just about the size of courts and the number of boys on a team and that sort of thing — nothing about actually playing the game. Really frustrating.

    Comment by Ardis E. Parshall — October 17, 2011 @ 9:29 am

  3. We played a game in junior high school (in the late 60s) that was similar to volleyball but the net was lower and you could let the ball bounce–just once, if I remember correctly. I don’t remember what we called it, but it wasn’t vanball.

    Comment by Mark B. — October 17, 2011 @ 10:23 am

  4. I love the adult hobby show. It looks like the “hobbies du jour” back then were lampshades and flower arranging, which were eventually replaced with giant glass grapes and tole painting.

    Comment by -MMM- — October 17, 2011 @ 10:31 am

  5. Ardis, Do you think B. Dwaine Madsen is Brigham D. Madsen?

    Comment by Gary Bergera — October 17, 2011 @ 11:03 am

  6. I just spent a few minutes looking at the sources on the Catawba. There is a thesis “A Study of the Influence of the Mormon Church on the Catawba Indians of South Carolina 1882-1975” (entire thesis available for download at the bottom left) written by Jerry Lee in 1976 and it looks pretty good but I don’t have time to read it right now. There is also some other literature on the topic, but this one would be the major source for the Catawba members of the church.

    Chester Harris is shown in the picture above. The Harris family seems to have been one of the prominent families in the tribe. Eight of the Catawba Chiefs serving between 1877 and 1962 were named Harris.

    Comment by Amy T — October 17, 2011 @ 11:30 am

  7. I never thought of that, Gary! Could be (I’ll check the missionary index and get back to you).

    Comment by Ardis E. Parshall — October 17, 2011 @ 11:42 am

  8. Yup, that’s Brig Madsen all right.

    Comment by Ardis E. Parshall — October 17, 2011 @ 12:02 pm

  9. I like the G&G ball photos. I’ll look for a post about that shortly after the one about vanball.

    Comment by The Other Clark — October 17, 2011 @ 12:18 pm

  10. My husband’s grandmother may be one of those Beehive Girls in Rotterdam! Would it be possible for you to email me a larger copy of that photo? Thanks!

    Comment by mahana — October 17, 2011 @ 10:42 pm

  11. Sure, mahana. I have internet access only through my Kindle at the moment, though, so it will have to wait for a day or two.

    Comment by Ardis E. Parshall — October 18, 2011 @ 6:49 am

  12. Amy: I can verify that the Harris name is quite prominent amongst the Catawba Tribe, at least the SC division though I understand it is prevelant in the Colorado division too. The cemetary next to the Catawba Ward building near Rock Hill, SC has dozens of Harris family headstones. The Beck, Blue and the Wade families are also strongly represented. Many members of the tribe are faithful Latter-day Saints, though there are those who are separating themselves. It was my pleasure to serve alongside these good brothers and sisters in my last Stake, and got to attend Church in the Catawba building for two years.

    Comment by Chad Too — October 19, 2011 @ 3:06 pm

  13. The Lee Thesis is not a good source if you are looking for good work, he did a poor job of reading the old handwritting. Being a direct descendant and current Catawba genealogist, I corrected his mistakes, since I am related to those he wrote about. My paternal uncle was the first Lamanite Patriarch ordained in the Church. I do not understand why people I contributed information to, are cited as Gospel sources and I am never mentioned.
    Chester Harris had no children, and he also had another companion named Clint Adair, which I am including in my 4th book of Catawba Genealogy. All my books are in the FHC and the Church Historical Department.
    Judy Canty Martin

    Comment by Judy Canty Martin — January 23, 2014 @ 4:39 pm

  14. Judy,

    Thanks for your comments here and on the Southern States history chapter on the Catawbas on my blog.

    And thank you for the work you’ve done on the history of the Tribe and your family history. Compiling a reliable, detailed record of a family like yours is a great service to the history of the Church.

    And, about the inadequate sourcing of family contributions to historical projects: that is a regular ongoing problem. The history community does need to learn how to use and source these contributions adequately. I can think of a few contemporary, published Mormon historians I dislike citing precisely because of this issue.

    Anyway, keep up the good work!

    Comment by Amy T — January 24, 2014 @ 11:09 am

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