Keepapitchinin, the Mormon History blog » Guest Post: “Died in the Service of Their Fatherland”: Latter-day Saints in Germany, World War I — part 2
 


Guest Post: “Died in the Service of Their Fatherland”: Latter-day Saints in Germany, World War I — part 2

By: Amy Tanner Thiriot - March 22, 2011

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This post continues the death notices of Latter-day Saint soldiers in the German military forces, published in Der Stern, the publication of the Swiss-German Mission.

Part 1 is found here, while images of all notices as they appeared in Der Stern can be viewed here.

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April 15, 1918:

John 15:13
[Greater love hath no man than this, that a man lay down his life for his friends.]

Revelation 2:10
[Fear none of those things which thou shalt suffer:
… be thou faithful unto death, and I will give thee a crown of life.]

In Memoriam

The following members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints died in the service of their Fatherland:

Heinrich Wilhelm Rubow

Member of the Berlin Branch, died on September 1917 in a French prison as the result of a shot to the heart. He was born on December 9, 1894 in Stettin and baptized on March 31, 1903.

Ernst Schulz

Member of the Kiel Branch, died in the service of his Fatherland on March 2, 1918. He was born on August 21, 1889 in Rummelsburg by Berlin and baptized on July 28, 1912. He was a diligent servant of God.

Kurt Arno Lucas

Member of the Leipzig Branch, died in a military hospital in Dresden on March 8, 1918. He was born on September 26, 1881 in Steinpleiß, Saxony, and baptized on May 13, 1914.

Otto Gustav Puder

Member of the Spandau Branch, killed on the western front on March 22, 1918. He was born on September 5, 1887 in Stettin and baptized on October 5, 1905.

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We express our deepest sympathy to the bereaved and hope that the comforting influence of the Lord will be with them.

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June 15, 1918:

John 15:13
Revelation 2:10

In Memoriam

The following members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints died in the service of their Fatherland:

Karl Bruno Hugo Ibe

Member of the Braunschweig Branch, killed on March 21, 1918. He was born on April 2, 1890 in Neustadt by Hannover and baptized on December 16, 1908.

Alfred Eugen Geislinger

Member of the Pforzheim Branch, killed on April 16, 1918. He was born on October 31, 1895 in Pforzheim and baptized on August 30, 1914.

Friedrich Georg Heinrich Heck

Member of the Frankfurt Branch, killed on May 11, 1918 in Cheminot. He was born on February 22, 1897 and baptized on May 4, 1912.

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We express our deepest sympathy to the bereaved. May the Lord richly bless them and strengthen their belief in a glorious resurrection.

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July 15, 1918:

John 15:13
Revelation 2:10

In Memoriam

The following members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints died in the service of their Fatherland:

Karl Hermann Bräuer

Member of the Chemnitz Branch, killed in the theater of war on July 1, 1917. He was born on November 9, 1896 in Chemnitz and baptized on October 28, 1910.

Max Albert Fehr

Member of the St. Galler Branch, killed in the war on August 5, 1917. He was born on February 22, 1893 in Pforzheim and baptized on March 7, 1913.

Friedrich Georg Heinrich Heck

Member of the Frankfurt Branch, killed on May 11, 1918. He was born on February 22, 1897 in Frankfurt am Main and baptized on May 4, 1912.

Walter Kurt Rahmsdorf

Member of the Spandauer Branch, a victim of the World War on June 11, 1918. He was born on December 5, 1899 in Gotha and baptized on May 22, 1909.

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We express our deepest sympathy to the bereaved and hope that the comforting influence of the Lord will be with them.

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August 15, 1918:

John 15:13
Revelation 2:10

In Memoriam

The following members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints died in the service of their Fatherland:

Karl Edwin Hornickel

Member of the Zwickau Branch, died on July 31, 1918 after a serious injury received on July 27, 1918 on French soil. He was born on September 19, 1899 in Schedewitz by Zwickau and was baptized on October 1, 1910. He is the youngest son of our beloved branch president in Zwickau and lived according to his beliefs to the day of his death.

Thilo Fritzsche

Member of the Werdauer Branch, killed on the battlefield on April 7, 1918. He was born on May 19, 1890 in Obergrünberg, Saxony, and baptized on May 7, 1915. He was also a very good brother.

Hermann Ludwig Wagner

Member of the Plauen Branch, died on March 25, 1918. He was born on February 19, 1848 in Mühldorff by Plauen and baptized on January 22, 1910.

Franz Albert Bühring

Member of the Plauen Branch, was registered as missing after the Battle of Arras on April 17, 1917. He was born on March 13, 1896 and baptized on March 10, 1910.

Rifleman August Göbel

Born on June 9, 1896 at Frankfurt am Main, killed on his birthday this year in the west. He was very beloved in the Frankfurt Branch.

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May the Lord bless the bereaved.



10 Comments »

  1. Thanks again, Amy.

    I wondered, though, about Hermann Ludwig Wagner, who would have been 70 years old when he died. He was a year younger than Field Marshal Hindenburg, the Chief of the General Staff–but I’d be interested in knowing how many others that age were still on active duty in the German Army at that time. Was Brother Wagner one of them?

    Comment by Mark B. — March 22, 2011 @ 10:21 am

  2. I note Franz Albert Bühring. Most (not all) of these men are reported with specific dates and even causes of death, whereas Franz has been missing for more than a year but is now presumed to be dead.

    Comment by Ardis E. Parshall — March 22, 2011 @ 10:44 am

  3. Wow — this is bittersweet. I thought the description of the one death (“[died] as the result of a shot to the heart”) was as upsetting as the line of sympathy (“[m]ay the Lord richly bless them and strengthen their belief in a glorious resurrection”) was encouraging.

    Comment by David Y. — March 22, 2011 @ 11:10 am

  4. David,

    I took note of that as well for Heinrich Wilhelm Rubow. It would appear that he may have been executed while in a prisoner of war camp for some unspecified reason.

    As to the missing, I suspect that there may have been many more missing, just not yet declared dead. I suspect as time went on that there were many more notices regarding those who had gone missing, and after a year were declared dead.

    As always a sobering reminder of how our religion cuts across many national boundaries, and should help us to remember not to demonize our enemies.

    Comment by kevinf — March 22, 2011 @ 1:49 pm

  5. Hopefully we’ll be able to translate and post more of those.

    yesyesyesyesyesyesyesyesyesyes!!!

    Comment by Ardis E. Parshall — March 22, 2011 @ 3:40 pm

  6. I’m glad to see that you’ve noticed some of the same things I found interesting.

    In more peaceful times, Heinrich Wilhelm Rubow who died in the French prison “infolge eines Herzschusses,” may have been returning from a mission or thinking about starting a family.

    I wondered if Brother Wagner’s birth date could be wrong, but the only place I could find him was on New Family Search, and that information seemed to be from these death notices. The Archives has two different copies of the Stern online, and one of the copies has check marks next to each man listed in these soldier death notices. Seventy is an awfully advanced age to be involved in a war.

    The note about Karl Edwin Hornickel, “the youngest son of our beloved branch president in Zwickau and lived according to his beliefs to the day of his death,” is reminiscent in its language to the letters written to the Stern from the front. Hopefully we’ll be able to translate and post more of those.

    Comment by Amy T — March 22, 2011 @ 2:53 pm

  7. I found the short bits of commentary on a few of the notices especially touching. Thanks for putting this up.

    Comment by J. Stapley — March 22, 2011 @ 5:00 pm

  8. Bruder Wagner age is of interest. He died during the last year of the war at a time when the Germans were gambling trying to win the war. They had just knocked the Russians out of the war and threw everything they had on the Western Front–i.e. the Ludendorff offensive. Given the losses the German had suffered during the war, by the spring of 1918, the Germans were filling the gaps with any and every one they could find including young teens and old men. That said, 70 years old does seem quite old to be on the front lines.

    I found Thilo Fritsche’s bio interesting as well. It stated that he was baptized in May 1915. This is proof positive that missionary work continued after the beginning of the war carried out by the locals. Way to go!

    Comment by Steve C. — March 22, 2011 @ 8:36 pm

  9. I have had the opportunity to look through all the 1914-1918 German Stern Magazines and have seen so many death notices. I one collected all the Frankfurt am Main Ward’s death notices and there were so many that I am guessing that most of the Elders quorum must have been killed. I am wondering if the Temple work has been done for them for as there was no Temple in Europe they would not have had the chance to take out their endowments.

    Comment by Mark McKenzie — August 15, 2011 @ 6:28 am

  10. Mark, we’d have to check New Family Search name by name to be sure, but there’s a possibility that the temple work has been done. This is exactly the time that procedures were being developed to do the work for faithful Saints who died “in the mission field.” It would have taken some time, and there could easily be people who slipped through the cracks, while those procedures were being established.

    How about searching the names of your Frankfurt am Main Ward elders and seeing what you find? A report, whatever turns up, would be a great guest post of interest to Keepa readers.

    Comment by Ardis E. Parshall — August 15, 2011 @ 6:36 am

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