Keepapitchinin, the Mormon History blog » Stories of the Book of Mormon: Omni, parts 3 and 4 (GRAPHIC NOVEL)
 


Stories of the Book of Mormon: Omni, parts 3 and 4 (GRAPHIC NOVEL)

By: Phil Dalby - January 30, 2011

For background, see here
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4 Comments »

  1. That “Copyright applied for” makes me smile every time.

    I must admit that Sundays are usually busy, and I haven’t followed this series very faithfully, but I clicked over to see how Dalby would have rendered Omni, stylistically speaking. Very curious. What intriguing details, for example, Amaleki’s curly hair and beard.

    And what an interesting first line: “From where could these people have come?” That construction, grammatically correct as it may be, sure sounds stilted.

    Comment by Researcher — January 30, 2011 @ 8:27 am

  2. Re: copyright (in case my posting bothers anybody): Copyright was never perfected, meaning these strips are in the public domain. Under today’s copyright laws a creator has a protected copyright the instant he lifts his pen from the page, but in the era these were created, there were specific hoops you had to jump through to secure copyright. Also, copyright would have had to have been renewed between then and now. Neither was done (I checked).

    Re the curly hair and beard: Details like this are what really attracted me to this series. It will become more evident as we get to Mosiah and Alma where the main characters are running into people outside their immediate cultures, and when there is a greater passage of time. As he developed more skill, Dalby learned to give each culture a distinctive look, and he experimented with different textural elements to improve the look of his strips. These are going to get much, much better very soon.

    Comment by Ardis E. Parshall — January 30, 2011 @ 8:41 am

  3. Oh, Ardis, I wasn’t questioning you putting up these posts; I just find it amusing that he would feel the need to put that on his comic strips. The market for such a thing would have been quite limited (the English-speaking Mormon market), and the potential for syndication would have been even more limited than that! : )

    Comment by Researcher — January 30, 2011 @ 3:05 pm

  4. I knew you weren’t questioning me, Researcher! You just gave me a good excuse to explain that. The copyright symbol is so prominent on so many strips that I’ve wondered whether anybody thought I was violating Dalby’s (or his heirs’) rights.

    It *is* kind of funny, isn’t it, that he felt the need to protect his copyright! I mean, I’m glad he was proud enough of his work to want to claim it and all, but you’re right — what realistic danger was he protecting against?! The expense of copyrighting vs. the limited market may be one reason he didn’t go through with the actual legal process.

    Comment by Ardis E. Parshall — January 30, 2011 @ 3:11 pm

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