Keepapitchinin, the Mormon History blog » Things Worth Knowing, 1911
 


Things Worth Knowing, 1911

By: Ardis E. Parshall - November 30, 2010

Someone – not Catherine Hurst, I feel certain – filled odd corners of the Young Woman’s Journal with a sort of Hints-from-Heloise type odds and ends. I like the window it opens into the practical problems of the past, so many of which we no longer have to deal with. So yeah, this is a filler for Keepa on a slow day. Enjoy. I expect to have life safely back on track after this afternoon and will get back to writing.

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Celery and onions are nerve tonics.

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Honey is a good substitute for cod liver oil.

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Use ordinary spools for candlesticks for small candles.

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A vanilla bean kept in the sugar jar imparts a delicate flavor to the sugar.

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The juice of a lemon is an excellent gargle for sore throat. Do not swallow.

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Beets and potatoes are fattening and good for people who want to put on flesh.

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Spinach, apples, carrots, dates, prunes, and Brazil nuts are excellent for sufferers from constipation.

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Put a towel folded several times in the bottom of pan in which you wash thin glasses, to save broken glass.

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To give a better flavor to dried fruit, soak in warm water, to which has been added a pinch of salt, before cooking.

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Turn glass fruit jars upside down in three inches of hot water for a few minutes, and the cover will unscrew easily.

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A couple of little red peppers dropped in the kettle with boiling cabbage will prevent the odor from going all over the house.

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Keep a pair of 10-cent canvas gloves with gauntlet near the stove to handle steaming kettles, meat that spatters, or to reach in oven, etc. Another pair should be kept to handle coal, sweep, shake rugs, etc.

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To remove glass stopper from bottle put end of stopper in crack of door, partly close the door, and turn bottle. This will loosen stopper.

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Cranberries are astringent, and correct inaction of the liver.

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To get rid of rats, stuff their holes with laundry soap, which has been well mixed with red pepper.

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Vinegar applied with a soft cloth will give a good polish to windows. First wipe off the dust with a dry cloth.

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Slight iron scorches will often disappear if the garment is laid in the bright sunshine for a while.

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When cooking mackerel or other soft fish, see that the skin side is placed uppermost.

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Cranberry poultices are cooling and afford speedy relief to those suffering with erysipelas. Applied hot they often relieve cases of inflammation of the bowels.

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When seats of cane chairs sag, scrub with soap and hot water, then dry in the sun. This will tighten the cane.

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Do not wear gloves that are a size too small or fasten too tightly. This prevents free circulation and makes the hands red.

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When a child has taken poison, first call the doctor. Then give a teaspoonful of mustard in a glass of warm water. It may be necessary to open the jaws by inserting a knife between the teeth.

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When coughing or sneezing always cover the mouth or nose, as the mucus escaping from these organs is infectious.

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When making kitchen aprons put the large pocket on the wrong side. It will answer just as well, and will not catch in door knobs, hooks, etc., which tear the apron.

—oooOooo—

A weak solution of turpentine poured down the water pipes once a week will keep the water bugs away.

—oooOooo—

Keep a pumice stone near the kitchen sink. When there are brown streaks in your granite or porcelain lined kettles, rub them off with the stone.

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A spoonful of sugar added to the water for basting meat will give it a rich brown color, and the flavor will be much improved.

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Use a baking powder can instead of a knife to chop fried potatoes, etc.

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If your soup is found too salty, add a few slices of raw potato, and boil a little longer. The potato will absorb the surplus salt.

—oooOooo—

Nails used in kitchen and bathrooms on which damp towels or clothes are hung, should have a coat of paint or enamel to prevent rusty marks.

—oooOooo—

It is better both for economy and comfort to wear two pairs of shoes alternately, instead of one pair every day.

—oooOooo—

If a turkey or chicken is rubbed inside and out with lemon it will make the meat white, juicy, and tender.

—oooOooo—

Rub over new tinware with lard and thoroughly heat it in the oven before using it, and thus prevent it from rusting.

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A good vegetable grater can be made from a tin pail cover, by driving many holes through it with a nail.

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Much time may be saved if all soiled bottles, frying pans, and kettles are filled with cold water until time to wash them.

—oooOooo—

Every kitchen should be provided with a small brush to be used for scrubbing potatoes, celery, parsnips, and other ground vegetables.

—oooOooo—

To use up coal dust, pile it carefully on a piece of paper and lay it on the fire. In this way it can be burned without smothering the fire.



15 Comments »

  1. Some fascinating hints, Ardis, but oh my! am I glad I was never a poisoned child :-O

    Comment by Alison — November 30, 2010 @ 9:29 am

  2. Interesting collection of helpful hints. Are you sure it wasn’t Catherine Hurst? There’s a hint about her favorite topic – how to avoid constipation. :-)

    Comment by Keri Brooks — November 30, 2010 @ 10:13 am

  3. Why so certain not from the pen of Catherine Hurst? Just curious.

    Comment by David Y. — November 30, 2010 @ 10:14 am

  4. Just glad they called them brazil nuts, and not the name for them I heard when I was a child!

    Comment by Coffinberry — November 30, 2010 @ 1:04 pm

  5. I agree, honey is a great substitute for cod liver oil!

    Should you rub the chickens and turkeys with lemon before or after they’re dead?

    And, as for getting rid of rats, I think the young men of the church would have preferred the method devised by Willie and Joe, Bill Mauldin’s favorite GIs.

    Comment by Mark B. — November 30, 2010 @ 1:24 pm

  6. A vanilla bean kept in the sugar jar imparts a delicate flavor to the sugar.

    I do that. It works nicely, but I keep the vanilla sugar separate from my regular supply, since not every use of sugar is conducive to vanilla flavor.

    When coughing or sneezing always cover the mouth or nose, as the mucus escaping from these organs is infectious.

    The germ theory of disease. This was just a few years after the death of Louis Pasteur, one of the fathers of microbiology and proponents of the germ theory. Robert Koch, one of the other giants in the development of the theory had just died, and Joseph Lister was still alive in 1911, when these tips were published.

    Comment by Researcher — November 30, 2010 @ 1:39 pm

  7. Cranberries are astringent, and correct inaction of the liver.

    But how do you know it’s your liver that’s inactive? In spite of the germ theory recognized in the example of sneezing and coughing, there is still some dubious folk wisdom in these hints.

    Comment by kevinf — November 30, 2010 @ 3:37 pm

  8. People in my mission on Buenos Aires blame everything on the liver–aching knees, stomach pain, blurry vision, nearly anything. They always said that a bad night was caused by an attack of liver. There were many remedies that helped your liver.

    Comment by Carol — November 30, 2010 @ 7:16 pm

  9. What is erysipelas? And, I’ve always wondered how to pronounce poultice. Some people swear it’s “pollice” with a silent “t”. That’s the sort of question I save for Ardis.

    Comment by Carol — November 30, 2010 @ 7:21 pm

  10. Erysipelas is a bacterial skin infection.

    I’ve looked for an “official” pronunciation of poultice, and they all include the t.

    Comment by SilverRain — December 1, 2010 @ 7:43 am

  11. Reading this made me feel like I was in my grandma’s kitchen in her house on Wall St. I can smell the apples.

    Comment by Stephen Taylor — December 1, 2010 @ 12:36 pm

  12. And by the way, a good title for a blog might be “People Very Worth Knowing, 2010: Ardis Parshall.”

    Comment by Stephen Taylor — December 1, 2010 @ 12:39 pm

  13. Man, it’s been a long time since there were houses on Wall Street. Just how old are you, Stephen? : )

    Or is there another Wall Street?

    Comment by Mark B. — December 1, 2010 @ 12:49 pm

  14. Thanks, Silver.

    Agreed, Stephen.

    Comment by Carol — December 1, 2010 @ 2:29 pm

  15. I’m furious that at least one of these hints didn’t make it out of Zion and south to Tucson, Arizona when I was growing up! I would have really appreciated a tablespoon of honey to the one I got every day of cod liver oil! When I get to the other side, my grandmother and I will be having words!

    Comment by Velikiye Kniaz — December 3, 2010 @ 9:06 pm

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