Keepapitchinin, the Mormon History blog » Be Honest With Yourself: “Oh, Say What Is Truth!” — with a Keepa twist
 


Be Honest With Yourself: “Oh, Say What Is Truth!” — with a Keepa twist

By: Ardis E. Parshall - March 08, 2010

(See here for background)

Keepa’ninny Bessie — who shared pictures of her paper Salt Lake City — tells this story about this “Be Honest With Yourself” card:

The cards were not cheesy to this 1950s teenager. Through the years I’d regretted not keeping better track of mine. Then I found this one in my father’s things after he passed away in 1992. And I knew why he kept it.

That is his daughter (me) sitting on the fountain stool to the left.

His friend, the druggist at the A. & G. Drug Store on South State Street, gave me a job in about 1958. I worked the fountain, clerked, and delivered prescriptions in Mr. Anderson’s little blue jeep. He asked if I’d like to be in a picture they were shooting there one Saturday. The girl behind the fountain in the white starched uniform was working, and her sister and I would be patrons at the fountain in the picture. I was surprised when the card came out to see me wearing a red top. I had worn a blue flowered two-piece dress I’d sewn myself. I was pretty happy though; I looked so much better than in real life.

From 1959 —

Oh, Say What Is Truth!

What a wonderful world this would be if everybody believed and practiced the teachings of the Saviour:

“Ye shall know the truth,
and the truth shall make you free.”

Lucky for you who live in a land built on a belief in truth and justice. Not all people are so fortunate.

As children we are naturally honest. And we would likely so remain but for the bad examples, group pressures, or lack of effective moral teaching in our lives.

Should untruthfulness creep into our lives it is likely to come first in faint disguise: in exaggeration; in concealment of some pertinent facts when people have a right to believe that what we say is the whole truth and nothing but the truth; in pretending that we agree with someone else’s statement when he expresses an idea or an opinion which is contrary to our own; in refraining from speaking up in defense of a person or a cause when we know we ought to do so; in making promises which we do not intend to keep.

Only after we have grown callous to some of these milder forms of indirect deceit are we likely to tell deliberate falsehoods. Most people are innocent of intentional and outright deception.

Young men and young women: how valiant are you to defend the truth? Do you stand up to the careless opinions and irresponsible claims which are so often expressed when young people engage in casual talk?

How careful are you in expressing your own opinions and in sticking to facts in your own speech?

If all people were strictly truthful and honest, righteousness would soon cover the earth –and heaven would not be far beyond!

So, believe the truth, tell the truth, love the truth, live the truth.

BE HONEST WITH YOURSELF



13 Comments »

  1. Should untruthfulness creep into our lives it is likely to come first in faint disguise: in exaggeration; in concealment of some pertinent facts when people have a right to believe that what we say is the whole truth and nothing but the truth; in pretending that we agree with someone else’s statement when he expresses an idea or an opinion which is contrary to our own; in refraining from speaking up in defense of a person or a cause when we know we ought to do so; in making promises which we do not intend to keep.

    I really like this statement and I wish they would print things like this in the “For the Strength of Youth” and in Manuals teaching the principle of honesty. It more accurately defines the shades of gray as dishonesty rather than allowing individuals to use those shades of gray to excuse their dishonest tendencies.

    Comment by Robynne Boysen — March 8, 2010 @ 8:42 am

  2. I finally got Robynne on board! She is now a ‘Ninny too!

    Comment by Eric Boysen — March 8, 2010 @ 8:44 am

  3. I spoke too soon. She still lingers in the Limbo of moderation :(

    Comment by Eric Boysen — March 8, 2010 @ 8:49 am

  4. Welcome to ‘Ninnyhood, Robynne! Everybody’s first comment goes to moderation as a precaution, but that’s as rough as initiation gets around here — all future comments should post immediately.

    Comment by Ardis E. Parshall — March 8, 2010 @ 8:55 am

  5. Nice! And not a shred of cheesiness to be found anywhere!

    Comment by Hunter — March 8, 2010 @ 9:07 am

  6. What fun! I hope you have a framed version somewhere entitled ‘This Is Me’?

    Comment by Anne (U.K) — March 8, 2010 @ 12:40 pm

  7. Thanks for the post, Ardis. I sent a link to a girl-friend (that word is used rather loosely), since we are both the same vintage. She wrote back to say she’d gone searching for her “Treasure’s of Truth” (the binder we put together in those years to store such stuff). She wanted to see if she happened to save that card. She would have stashed it there about thirty-five years before we actually met and became friends.

    Life has proved the truth of the counsel written on that card.

    Thanks for the fun, I think I might frame it!

    Comment by Bessie — March 8, 2010 @ 2:48 pm

  8. Frame it with a piece of glass instead of board in the back – then you can still read the message.

    Thanks for sending in your story, Bessie. Behind-the-scenes glimpses like yours turn history into something so much more personal to all of us.

    Comment by Ardis E. Parshall — March 8, 2010 @ 2:53 pm

  9. I never did and don’t think about the Be Honest With Yourself cards as cheesy. Rather, idealistic in a way that made me want to be better.

    I remember reading and thinking about the cards posted on our ward bulletin board and evaluating how I could better live up to the standards they described. I wish the Church would circulate them once again!

    Comment by Stephen Taylor — March 9, 2010 @ 2:32 pm

  10. Then it’s unanimous: NO CHEESE INVOLVED.

    Thanks, Stephen.

    Comment by Ardis E. Parshall — March 9, 2010 @ 3:07 pm

  11. I just realized that I forgot to comment on this post. Nice post! Lovely picture, Bessie. That’s a great message on the back, as well.

    Comment by Researcher — March 9, 2010 @ 6:37 pm

  12. Thanks for this series. I printed several of them for my YW lesson on honesty today.

    Comment by HokieKate — October 16, 2011 @ 8:14 am

  13. Thanks for reporting that, HokieKate. It really tickles me to hear that Keepa is useful in the real world.

    Comment by Ardis E. Parshall — October 16, 2011 @ 8:46 am

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