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The Whole Year Through: The Children’s Friend, 1950

By: Ardis E. Parshall - December 02, 2009

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Fairyland came to The Children’s Friend in 1950, with magical creatures frosting the windows, causing summer lightning and thunder, and molding mountain, wave and cloud into fantastical shapes. Beyond the artist’s initials (LG? I think), there is no indication in the magazine as to the source or purpose of this theme — perhaps it is only the whimsy of childhood.

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January

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December

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5 Comments »

  1. Good to see that someone besides me sees fairies, mountains, and so forth as an “innocent whimsy of childhood;” not a pagan belief competing with the Church.

    Also interesting to note the 3-color covers. 2 and 3 color illustrations always scream “1950s” to me.

    Comment by Clark — December 2, 2009 @ 9:22 am

  2. Yup. There are at least two of us, Clark, and evidently a whole lot more in 1950. Fairy folk, except for perhps leprechauns, are not to my imaginative taste, but that’s more likely due to having been born during the Space Age when aliens rather than fairies dominate the imagination. But in neither case do I see creative fantasies like that as a challenge to religious faith.

    Comment by Ardis E. Parshall — December 2, 2009 @ 9:48 am

  3. These are so lovely. I wish I could get a complete set.

    (I LIKE the fairy folk even though I was a space age baby! I guess I read too many books lavishly illustrated by Arthur Rackham and the like.)

    Comment by Mina — December 4, 2009 @ 9:15 am

  4. There are at least two of us, Clark, and evidently a whole lot more in 1950.

    Count me in.

    (Do I lose half a count by saying as a p.s. that I am glad for the doctrinal approach now in Primary and in the magazines?)

    Comment by m&m — December 5, 2009 @ 1:05 am

  5. Yeah, I’m afraid we’ll have to dock you a fractional point, m&m. The old Children’s Friend was like the old Primary and included doctrinal material, but spoke to a child’s whole life because, as it was begun and grew, Mormon families had (or could afford) few options for wholesome child entertainment from outside the home. The new Friend suits the new Primary with its narrower focus in a world where umpteen options are available.

    Comment by Ardis E. Parshall — December 5, 2009 @ 8:22 am

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