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“Honored and Famous”: Another Keepa “Enigma”

By: Ardis E. Parshall - March 27, 2009

This “Enigma” was written by Samuel Hammer. There are several men by that name in Utah at this period (1877); the most likely candidate is one born in Pennsylvania in 1862, and therefore still a teen when he submitted this to the Juvenile Instructor

As usual, please solve only one (not two, because this is short) letters and leave the rest for other readers to play along, too. Thanks for your consideration in that regard!

I am composed of 12 letters.

My 2, 3, 1, is a bone in the human body.

My 12, 10, 11, causes many accidents.

My 1, 9, 8, is a young animal of the male gender.

My 7, 6, 11 is a grown up animal of the same gender.

My 4, 2, 6, 3, 11, is raised in abundance in Utah.

My 1, 3, 11, is what it is often kept in.

My 11, 9, 10, 11, is the name of anything.

My 5, 6, 7, is used for food.

My 7, 6, 2, 8, is a girl’s name.

My whole is the name of a man, honored in Utah and famous throughout the world.



17 Comments »

  1. Ardis, I solved the whole thing, but I think there are some numbers awry in the clues:

    I think “Grown up animal of same gender” ought to be 7, 6, 11 (unless our puzzle creator is speaking with a Scottish accent)

    and

    “What it is often kept in” might make more sense if it were 1,3, 11, because as far as I can tell, a five in the middle makes no sense.

    Comment by Coffinberry — March 27, 2009 @ 7:03 am

  2. And obviously the final letter 12 should be guessed from the whole?

    Comment by Coffinberry — March 27, 2009 @ 7:04 am

  3. Coffinberry — Using 12 instead of another letter in one of the clues would bring it in, too — I’ll make that substitution and the ones you note.

    Comment by Ardis E. Parshall — March 27, 2009 @ 7:18 am

  4. My 11, 9, 10, 11, is the name of anything.

    noun

    Comment by Justin — March 27, 2009 @ 8:17 am

  5. Correct, Justin — which may give others a point to start with, I hope.

    Comment by Ardis Parshall — March 27, 2009 @ 8:40 am

  6. Using 12 instead of another letter in one of the clues would bring it in, too — I’ll make that substitution

    Charlton Heston is not satisfied with your substitution.

    Comment by Last Lemming — March 27, 2009 @ 9:24 am

  7. My 4, 2, 6, 3, 11, is raised in abundance in Utah.

    Hmmm…polygs? ;-)

    Comment by Brian Duffin — March 27, 2009 @ 10:37 am

  8. My 2, 3, 1, is a bone in the human body.

    Rib

    Comment by Brian Duffin — March 27, 2009 @ 10:47 am

  9. My 12, 10, 11, causes many accidents.

    Gun

    Yeah, getting “noun” really jumpstarts the whole thing.

    Comment by Ray — March 27, 2009 @ 10:59 am

  10. I’m not going to solve another one in this comment, but . . .

    “My 4, 2, 6, 3, 11, is raised in abundance in Utah” really is astounding given Jim Bridger’s famous statement about the conditions in Utah when the saints first arrived.

    Comment by Ray — March 27, 2009 @ 11:01 am

  11. Too many letters, Brian, and a disagreement in verb. 8)

    Thanks, Ray. You are correct in both solutions, and in your clue.

    Comment by Ardis E. Parshall — March 27, 2009 @ 11:16 am

  12. Just to sure I’m on the right track….

    My 5, 6, 7, is used for food.

    Ham?

    Comment by Bruce Crow — March 27, 2009 @ 1:29 pm

  13. Make yourself a sandwich, Bruce, you’re on the right track.

    1 – B
    2 – R
    3 – I
    4 – G
    5 – H
    6 – A
    7 – M
    8 –
    9 – O
    10- U
    11- N
    12-

    Comment by Ardis E. Parshall — March 27, 2009 @ 1:44 pm

  14. I think I know who it is ;)

    Comment by Bruce Crow — March 27, 2009 @ 8:23 pm

  15. Ya think? :P

    Comment by Ardis E. Parshall — March 27, 2009 @ 8:28 pm

  16. I’m thoroughly embarrassed to say that it wasn’t until just now, going through the clues and answers a second time, that I finally “got” what the HECK these enigmas are about. [frustrated sigh]

    And, no, I won’t be calling Will Shortz’ program anytime soon.

    Comment by Hunter — March 28, 2009 @ 11:47 am

  17. Hunter, I didn’t know how to explain them — but having seen one, you understand how they work and can contribute to the next one. Asking that readers solve just one clue at a time hopefully gives almost everybody — afficianados like Coffinberry and readers who are new to this kind of puzzle — enough time to play along.

    Ron Watt, a former archivist at LDS Archives and now a church service missionary donating the same skills he used to be paid for, gave a talk last week about his ancestor George D. Watt. Ron passed out an “enigma” which George had answered in the newspaper in 18– um, ’54, I think. One man in the audience solved it instantly, who knows how. I recognized how it worked but was way too slow to compete. Some in the audience didn’t understand even after it was explained.

    Comment by Ardis E. Parshall — March 28, 2009 @ 12:14 pm

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