Keepapitchinin, the Mormon History blog » Latter-day Saint Images, 1920
 


Latter-day Saint Images, 1920

By: Ardis E. Parshall - November 30, 2008


Another page from our Latter-day Saint family album, with photos taken in 1920:

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St. Thomas, Nevada
(now flooded by Lake Mead)

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New York City

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Portland, Oregon

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1st Ward, Pocatello, Idaho

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Bovington Camp, Dorset, England

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 Independence, Missouri

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Magna, Utah

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Rupert, Idaho

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Salt Lake City Deaf Branch

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 San Pedro, California
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Washington, D.C.

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Sapporo, Japan

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Leicester, England

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23 Comments »

  1. I greatly enjoy these old photos of the different units of the Church. I was a bit surprised with the Sapporo, Japan branch. I knew that HJG had opened Japan in the early 20th century but was quite disappointed that the work wasn’t going well. My understanding was that there was only a handful of members before the Second World War. Pretty cool.

    Comment by Steve C. — November 30, 2008 @ 12:52 pm

  2. Ardis! I want further details on the New York City photo. I haven’t seen that one before! When during the year was it taken? Do you happen to know where in the city it was taken? Who are the people in the photo?

    Inquiring minds want to know! (at least those here in NYC)

    Comment by Kent Larsen — November 30, 2008 @ 6:02 pm

  3. No idea, Kent. These photos (except for the kids on the mule), as all the photos in my “Latter-day Saint Images” series, appear in the church magazines simply as illustrations of Sunday Schools or Relief Societies in various places. Once in a blue moon a missionary in a photo might be named, or a special occasion (dedication of a chapel, usually) is identified, but ordinarily no information beyond ward/branch is available.

    It’s like looking in a relative’s photo album and seeing all the family reunion pictures, knowing they’re all uncles and cousins but not knowing quite who is who.

    Steve, if I recall correctly, there were something under 300 members on the Japanese rolls when the mission was closed in the early 1920s, some of whom hadn’t been in touch with the church for years. I suspect that some? many? of those in the Sapporo picture were not baptized members, but were attending a missionary Sunday School. Still, they were either Saints, or touched in some way by the gospel, so I included them here.

    Comment by Ardis E. Parshall — November 30, 2008 @ 6:09 pm

  4. What caught my eye is the similarity of the architecture of the Portland, Oregon, building and the Brooklyn, NY, chapel that was completed just a year before.

    But for the gable and the wings on both sides, it could be the same building. (I’ll see if I can find a picture and deliver it somehow.)

    Comment by Mark B. — November 30, 2008 @ 7:18 pm

  5. I serve in the Sapporo, Japan mission – a few years after 1920. :) Thanks for the memories.

    Comment by Ray — November 30, 2008 @ 9:26 pm

  6. “served” – I’m tired.

    Comment by Ray — November 30, 2008 @ 9:26 pm

  7. I do enjoy these old pictures. Keep them coming.

    Comment by Maurine — November 30, 2008 @ 10:45 pm

  8. I believe the Portland building was dedicated in June 1915. It was designed by SL architects Pope and Burton.

    Comment by Justin — December 1, 2008 @ 7:30 am

  9. I find the hat versus no-hat divide rather intriguing. It even shows up in the first picture with the donkey!

    Comment by Researcher — December 1, 2008 @ 7:53 am

  10. The photo from St. Thomas caught my eye. The location played an important role in a way with regard to the KFD in the 20th century. What an interesting town!

    Comment by W. Smith — December 1, 2008 @ 10:37 pm

  11. On the Washington DC Photo, Do I see Reed Smoot on the Far right side of the picture?

    W. Smith – What does KFD stand for?

    Comment by BruceC — December 2, 2008 @ 11:09 am

  12. Bruce, I thought that looked like Reed Smoot, too, but wasn’t positive. He’s certainly long and lean enough.

    Comment by Ardis E. Parshall — December 2, 2008 @ 11:39 am

  13. #11. KFD=King Follett Discourse

    Comment by W. Smith — December 3, 2008 @ 3:51 pm

  14. I am looking forward to your book, W., so we can get at all this wonderful history you are hinting at.

    Comment by J. Stapley — December 3, 2008 @ 6:53 pm

  15. Intriguing. What possible connection is there between St Thomas, Nevada, and the King Follett Discourse?

    Comment by BruceC — December 4, 2008 @ 7:25 am

  16. Hello, I was wonder if you knew who the children are on the donkey? My grandfather was born in St. Thomas Nevada. Thanks

    Comment by S. Bunker — May 19, 2010 @ 5:26 pm

  17. Sorry, S., no. The picture was just a little filler pic (about the size of a postage stamp) in the Children’s Friend, and no one was identified by name.

    Comment by Ardis E. Parshall — May 19, 2010 @ 5:49 pm

  18. I’m sure that is Reed Smoot in the Washington D.C. photo. The branch was pretty small there and if I recall correctly, meetings were held in the Smoot home.

    Comment by Alan Barnett — February 7, 2012 @ 6:41 pm

  19. I LOVE that Portland Chapel. I know it’s no longer standing, but any idea which ward building it is?

    Comment by Jonathan — February 10, 2012 @ 8:09 pm

  20. We’ll have to hope another reader has some idea, Jonathan, because I don’t know.

    It has some similarities to the old Brooklyn chapel which is still standing, although no longer owned by the LDS Church.

    Comment by Ardis E. Parshall — February 10, 2012 @ 8:19 pm

  21. After looking into it a little bit, I think it was the Northwestern States Mission Chapel by Pope and Burton.

    Comment by Jonathan — February 10, 2012 @ 10:16 pm

  22. I spent a bunch of time researching the Portland Chapel today and was SUPER excited to find that it is still standing! Here is a street view of it. It was built in 1910, sold in 1940 (to the RLDS Church, I believe) and is now the Portland Dharma Center. The home next to it also appears to be still standing, and was the Mission Home during the same time period.

    Comment by Jonathan — February 11, 2012 @ 6:14 pm

  23. Hurray! Are you going to blog about this building, Jonathan? If so, I hope you’ll think to come back and leave a link here.

    That building has appeared in other photos here for different years, and if it’s of any use to you I’ll round up those photos and email them to you.

    Comment by Ardis E. Parshall — February 11, 2012 @ 6:21 pm

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