Keepapitchinin, the Mormon History blog
 


Single Saints

By: Ardis E. Parshall - September 03, 2015

The realization that I wasn’t going to marry was a process, not a moment. Shortly after returning from my disastrous mission, I learned that serving that mission had robbed me of the possibility of children which, in my mind, meant that anyone I could consider marrying would think twice – or more – about marrying me, so I frankly didn’t do much looking. Still, as birthdays came I sometimes wondered if that year would be my year, and the hope of marriage, however slim, stayed in the back of my mind. But eventually, at some point, I accepted reality. I mourned for a while longer, then I put it behind me, pulled up my socks, and finally began living the life that had been on hold for all those years.

So when I write about being single, please realize that I am well past interest in talking about where the men are, or why I didn’t marry, or what we can do to encourage marriage for older singles, or any of the other marriage-focused discussions on singles. Single is single; single for Latter-day Saints in my circumstances means single for life. I’m long since past the preparing-for-marriage stage and am well into living-the-life-I-have.

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Adaptation

By: Ardis E. Parshall - September 03, 2015

Adaptation

By Bertha A. Kleinman

The things I love with fervid clasp
Seem destined to decay,
The things I prize elude my grasp,
And these, too, pass away.

The things I say I will not do
Insistently demand,
The joyless things of sodden hour
Are always near at hand.

The things I say I will not bear
I must propitiate,
Like hosts assembled unaware
That enter at my gate.

The things I say I cannot stand
Knock grimly at my door —
In verity I must, I can,
And over yet and o’er.

And so the days contrary go
And life is passing strange —
That I must face the winds that blow,
And only I must change.

But this I know, that friendlier
Am I who can concede,
And bigger, stronger, kindlier
For all that I accede.

(1931)

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…can’t stop reading probates…

By: Amy Tanner Thiriot - September 03, 2015

Yesterday Ancestry.com released a “new and exclusive” U.S. Wills and Probate collection. If you have any genealogists in your life, you might notice them looking rather bleary-eyed today. That would be the result of spending a good part of the night reading probates that before yesterday were only accessible on microfilm.

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PhilipPugsleyfromHistofSLCEdited

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Philip Pugsley was a well-to-do Utah industrialist. After he died, the Salt Lake Herald noted:

A petition was filed in the district court yesterday by the executors of the estate of the late Philip Pugsley, asking that his will be filed for probate. The executors are Ezra Thompson, J. E. F. Pugsley and J. S. Barlow. The estate is valued at about $35,576.31. (Salt Lake Herald, “Court Notes,” August 20, 1903.)

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“The Affidavit of That Murdered Man”: part 1½

By: Ardis E. Parshall - September 03, 2015

Part 2 of this story will not be posted until tomorrow.

Also: Using the adjective “illegal” as a noun representing a human being is now a banishable offense at Keepa.

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Questing Lights: Chapter 5

By: Ardis E. Parshall - September 02, 2015

Questing Lights

By Belle Watson Anderson

Previous chapter

Chapter 5

Synopsis: Andrew Rumgay leaves his mother and his fiancee Jane Allison in Scotland and joins his friend Hugh Shand to emigrate to America. They meet Mother MacKinlay and her son Bob, whom they had known while doing missionary work, and become acquainted with Kathleen Coleman and her friend Margaret Purvis. Hugh and Kathleen are married on board the ship. While in Iowa, preparing for the handcart journey across the plains, Margaret tells Mother Mac that she is in love with Andrew, and Kathleen tells the two women that she is expecting a baby. They journey on and survive the autumn storms. Andrew is missing one night and Margaret goes to his rescue and brings him back safely. The saints in Zion send food to them, and Margaret leaves the Mac to go with brother Brown to Tooele, Utah.

“Isn’t it wonderful, Andrew? if my home in heaven is this grand, I’ll be satisfied.”

“Yes, Mother,” slowly affirmed the young man. “I think I get what you mean. You will need a few more rooms in your mansion, but on the whole I think you can manage with this one for a time.”

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“I Take Up My Pen”: Deseret Gym, 1939

By: Ardis E. Parshall - September 02, 2015

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“The Affidavit of that Murdered Man”: part 1 of 2

By: Ardis E. Parshall - September 02, 2015

Here’s a lot of compressed history as a set-up to the story for part 2 of this post:

As big a deal as citizenship and naturalization is in the present American political climate, it was a much, much bigger deal in territorial Utah. One of the frequent charges against the Mormons was that they were aliens, not citizens – or, if they were citizens, their citizenship was illegitimate because they were not “Americanized” and had gained citizenship only to participate in elections where their votes were controlled by the Mormon despotism.

For their part, the Mormons objected to the way that courts, which controlled the granting of citizenship, were controlled by anti-Mormons; refusal to grant naturalization was one of the ways the anti-Mormon element unjustly denied the rights of Latter-day Saints.

So, from time to time, naturalization hearings in the court at Salt Lake were the source of intense public focus, as the candidates for naturalization were examined and ruled upon. Such was the case in mid-November, 1889, when a series of candidates for naturalization came before Judges Charles S. Zane and Thomas J. Anderson, justices of the Utah Supreme Court (a somewhat more complex position in territorial Utah than in Utah under statehood: the three supreme court justices also acted as judges in the district courts, positions which today are elected by the people as officers of the state. In territorial, these were federal officers appointed by the United States President. These judges were acting here in their capacity as judges of the district courts, not of the appellate court).

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Questing Lights: Chapter 4

By: Ardis E. Parshall - August 31, 2015

Questing Lights

By Belle Watson Anderson

Previous chapter

Chapter 4

Synopsis: Andrew Rumgay leaves his mother and his fiancee Jane Allison in Scotland and joins his friend Hugh Shand to emigrate to America. They meet Mother MacKinlay and her son Bob, whom they had known while doing missionary work, and become acquainted with Kathleen Coleman and her friend Margaret Purvis. Hugh and Kathleen are married on board the ship. While in Iowa preparing for the handcart journey across the plains, Margaret tells Mother Mac that she is in love with Andrew, and Kathleen informs them that she is expecting a baby.

Margaret, looking questioningly at the sky, re-echoed some ship lore: “Red skies at night, the sailor’s delight. Red skies in the morning, a sailor’s warning.”

Mother Mac tried to appear unaffected by such dark forebodings.”I’m not so sure that those heavy clouds are not the emigrants’ warning. Oh, well, there must always be some change I the weather,” she added.

It rained all night, and was still raining the next morning. As always, the handcarts and wagons needed repairs. The company decided to wait a few hours and let the animals graze further away from camp as grass had been scarce for several days.

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I Have a Question, 1954

By: Ardis E. Parshall - August 31, 2015

These answers to questions published in the Instructor in 1954 hint at former practices of the Sunday School that might sound exotic, even “wrong,” to us today — in the words of the internet meme, one of them blows my mind. It’s an indication of the passing of time and the evolution of programs to suit new conditions and expectations.

Question: I’m a new Sunday School superintendent in our ward. I find that the practice has been to assess monthly dues on Sunday School teachers. What does the General Board think about dues for officers and teachers?

Answer: There is nothing in the Sunday School Handbook that recommends dues. However, some wards distribute copies of The Instructor among teachers each month, and collect payment at the time. There is no objection to this. Nor is there any objection to a nominal collection for a Sunday School officers and teachers social, particularly after a faculty meeting. There are other occasions, such as money for flowers for a sick associate, when a little collection may be required.

However, burdensome collections or dues should be avoided. Funds for such things as visual aids, and other teachers’ aids, can be provided by making an adequate collection on Budget Sunday.

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In Our Ward: Lesson 32: “Live in the Spirit”

By: Ardis E. Parshall - August 30, 2015

Lesson 32: “Live in the Spirit”

Acts 18-20
Galatians

Purpose: to encourage class members to seek promptings from the Holy Ghost and to avoid attitudes and actions that will keep them from receiving these promptings.

Lesson Development

1. Paul teaches baptizes, and confers the Holy Ghost on believers in Ephesus.
2. Paul gives a farewell address to Church leaders from Ephesus.
3. Paul chastises and counsels the Galatian Saints.

Let’s start today with a little ancient history – partly because I like history, and partly because it can be useful to see how events in world history and events in church history affect each other. This will be too brief for you to get bored, I promise.

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