Keepapitchinin, the Mormon History blog
 


Edith Russell: Associate Editor

By: Ardis E. Parshall - February 19, 2017

Edith Russell was a native of Bradford, Yorkshire, England, born there in 1918. She was converted to the gospel in 1942,  baptized in September of that year. Almost immediately, her name begins showing up in the pages of the Millennial Star.

I’d seen her name as author of articles in the Star, but hadn’t realized until recently that she was its associate editor – really, the one responsible for most of the content, because the Star was only one of the responsibilities of its editor, who also coordinated Britain’s army of local lady missionaries who replaced the “elders from Zion” during the war years, and had other pastoral responsibilities during those years of priesthood shortage. Day-to-day operations of the magazine fell to Edith.

But not only was Edith the Star’s associate editor, assuming that role only two years after her baptism – she was also the first woman in the Star’s 100-plus years of publication to serve on its editorial staff. Her stories and editorials are quite good – her descriptions of moments in London under enemy action are especially poignant – and even her routine news items are written in a way that makes them feel personal, not routine.

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Funny Bones, 1927 (7)

By: Ardis E. Parshall - February 18, 2017

Here are some jokes we haven’t seen at Keepa before!

“Are you Hungary?”

“Yes, Siam.”

“Den Russia to the table and I will Fiji.”

“All right, pour my coffee and Denmark my bill.”

-oooOooo-

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Out of the Burning: Chapter 3

By: Ardis E. Parshall - February 17, 2017

Out of the Burning

By Ivy Williams Stone

(Previous chapter)

Chapter Three

The sentence imposed upon Silas Hoggan was indeterminate — one to twenty-five years. There could be no doubt he had had a hand in the kidnapping. Some confederate had taken the child back to the Hoggan cabin in Crow’s Nest. Judge Harrison was positive, even the sheriff suspicious. So the third degree wore on, the judge’s nerves taut, his patience gone. Echo Harrison fluctuated between hysterical consciousness and drug-induced coma. An efficient, motherly nurse came and took complete charge of the young Portia. From the hour of Pamela’s disappearance, the remaining child was never left alone.

“If you don’t return the child, unharmed, I’ll give you the limit,” thundered the judge. “You’ll stay in prison twenty-five years. You’ll die there.”

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Mesa Temple, 1957

By: Ardis E. Parshall - February 17, 2017

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Whole Year Through: Millennial Star Covers, 1936

By: Ardis E. Parshall - February 17, 2017

(I hope so many images won’t make this load impossible slowly; I can split it into two or more posts if necessary.)

There is at least one picture here that is misidentified … that ought to send you hunting! Let us all know which covers you like, which surprise you, or anything else you notice.

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2 January 1936. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 January 1936

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Valediction

By: Ardis E. Parshall - February 16, 2017

Valediction

By Evelyn H. Hughes

Doubt not, beloved, the justice of God’s way,
Though here beside the trail we two must part.
Oh, keep your faith serene, no trust betray –
No bitterness breed rancor in your heart.
Think not my journey futile ending here,
As westward all the wagons rumble past.
Each one gives his own gift. Remember, dear,
Beyond this waning hour our love shall last.
Only this mortal clay interred shall know
A rendezvous with darkness and its dread,
While winged, triumphant, my spirit shall go
Upward, where wait the deathless dead.
Oh, hand in hand, beloved, our journey won,
I shall go with you and our infant son!

(1961)

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“I Take Up My Pen”: [California] Ensign, 1939

By: Ardis E. Parshall - February 16, 2017

This Ensign was a southern California publication, not, of course, the current general Church magazine.

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What Is Your Problem? 1966-67

By: Ardis E. Parshall - February 16, 2017

These questions were answered in the pages of the Millennial Star, in 1966-67. Some, but not all, of the columns from which these questions are drawn were signed by Mark E. Petersen, who was then president of the West European Mission.

Remember that the fun of posts like this is discovering what issues were on the minds of Church members of the past, and seeing what might have changed since these questions were answered. A few definitely outdated answers are given in this series of three posts, so they shouldn’t be used as current policy (or to settle arguments?)

Question: What is the attitude of the Church on cremation?

Answer: The Church always advises its members to arrange for burial of their deceased loved ones in a cemetery, with proper funeral services and dedication of graves. In some instances, because of local conditions, and sometimes because of personal preference, relatives have their deceased cremated, and they are within their rights in doing so. But it is customary to advise burial of the body instead of cremation. In cases of cremation, funeral services are always conducted in the same manner as where a burial is to be provided. There is but one difference in our ceremonies. We do dedicate a grave for the burial of the body, but we do not dedicate the crypt where the ashes of a cremated person are kept.

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Out of the Burning: Chapter 2

By: Ardis E. Parshall - February 15, 2017

Out of the Burning

By Ivy Williams Stone

(Previous chapter)

Chapter Two

Miss Eunice had never been to Crow’s Nest. The roads were poor, the people undesirable. Such were her early impressions. Her father had regarded it as the fly in the county’s otherwise perfect ointment. He considered it a place of pestilence and law defiance, as the refuge of people who needed isolation. Now as she rode over the narrow, sloping dugways and rutted roads, saw the jutting rocks and the starved, blighted vegetation, a great pity smote her heart. The stunted hickory trees, the sickly looking persimmons, the sparse underbrush indicated that nature had a great struggle merely to exist; how could humans prosper under such conditions? Unbridged gullys bore mute evidence of the difficulty of travel; for a certainty the county’s road money went in other directions. It seemed a marvel that these people could produce as good a living as they did. The school house, which the state law required, was unprepossessing and forlorn, no stimulus to the education which these mountaineers were reputed to discourage. The old car lurched and swayed, ground over high centers, sank into deep ruts.

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Glamor Tip for Mormon Girls, 1953

By: Ardis E. Parshall - February 15, 2017

From the Improvement Era, June 1953 –

Glamorize Your Glasses

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Long ago, girls discovered the wisdom of wearing glasses when needed. But still, many of us who wear them continue to leave them at home when we attend parties. We don’t feel festive while wearing them, so we spend the evening squinting at foggy faces.

The answer to our dilemma would be to have a wardrobe of glasses, but that would be expensive. yet, there’s a way to solve the problem, easily and becomingly.

How? Simply by clipping a shiny earring on your glasses where the earpiece connects with the rim. The earring idea is enhanced when the sparkler matches your costume pin.

And it’s very pleasant to be able to see, people at the party.

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